I'm under the impression you've all received some instruction on how to find solid resources for reserach projects. So you're coming into these chapters with some background knowledge. The hope is that UnSpun helps you look at your resources even more critically than you did before. So, I'd like you to reflect on what the two chapters offered you. For this blog please respond to the following:

1. What's one thing you can take away from each chapter as you step back into the research process?
2. How  will you apply what you read to our current research process/project?

To receive full credit, please respond with TEXTUAL REFERENCES, thoughtfully comment on someone else's post, and proofread your posts before publishing.
Maddie Williams
2/20/2013 03:14:48 am

These two chapters were very valuable to the research I am about to do. It's obvious that we can use this information with this paper. But each chapter offered different advice. Chapter 6, I learned a lot by reading the example on Cold-Eeze. It talks about the fact that Cold-Eeze is clinically proven with a Zinc Complex to heal colds, but when the authors took a closer look, the studies that proved this wasn't always so. The book reveals that "...some scientific studies have found that zinc gluconate...seemed to reduce the duration and severity of cold symptoms, but several other scientific studies have found no such effect" (119-120). With this in mind, I learned from chapter 6 that just because one study proves something, doesn't mean the others did. It could have been a lucky day or just randomly happened to give supportive results that the company could utilize. I buy me dunces such as Cold Eeze all the time, and by being more wary of things like this, I can protect myself. I learned more in Chapter 7 than I did in Chapter 6. It is filled with ways to check the reliability of ones sources. Perhaps the biggest take away is the list of essential questions that the authors urge readers to ask as they scan the web. They present many questions, including: "What are they selling?...What's their reputation?...Can I verify?...Who's behind it?...Who's paying?...Who are the people?..." (144-150). The authors then go into detail about how to use these questions to make sure your sources are reliable and relevant. Another take away from this chapter is the websites they assured readers would most likely be safe, such as those that end in .gov and .edu. After reading these chapters, I feel much better going into my research. I know what websites to looks for, and what ones to avoid (Wikipedia!). Also, by knowing how to question the author and what their motives are, I will be able to pick sources that will give me good information that is valuable to my topic.

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Maddie Williams
2/20/2013 03:18:54 am

Sorry guys, Autocorrect got me and I didn't catch it. I meant to say "I buy medicines such as."

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Kylie Wermund
2/20/2013 03:19:21 am

I also found the questions they offer to be helpful. It is an easy list that can be referenced if I am questioning if a source is reliable.

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Kylie Wermund
2/20/2013 03:17:19 am

From the first chapter, I found the lesson "Not All 'Studies' Are Equal" to be the most helpful when it comes to my research paper. The suggested questions like "How old are the data?" and "What method did the source use ot obtain the information?" are questions that I will need to ask myself as I obtain my resources. My issue is minors using tanning salons. The question of how old is the data is very important in my research. Tanning salons have just recently began to increase in popularity, so the number of minors that used them years ago will be significantly less than the number today. Also, the method used to obtain the data is important. If somebody stood outside a tanning salon and counted the number of minors that entered over the course of one day, the number would be different than if someone went into a school and asked students if they have ever been to a tanning salon. The questions offered in this lesson will be helpful as I look for my sources.

The second chapter explains that while there are some helpful things to be found on the internet, there are also many harmful falicies. On page 131, the authors remind the reader to "consider the source." They tell us to look for "sources with authority." This will also be helpful in my research paper. The sources claiming that tanning can cause skin cancer have to be reliable. It is very important to make sure that the information I receive is in fact true.

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Maddie Williams
2/20/2013 03:21:01 am

Kylie, I agree with you on the fact that though there is a lot of helped sights, we should be more wary about the ones that seem to be helpful but aren't. Especially to look for sources with authority.

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Emma Chester
2/20/2013 04:29:04 am

I can totally see how examining data will be useful in your paper. I also found the relevance of data to be important, as numbers are changing all the time. Considering the source is a great thing, too. We often just assume something is truthful when it may not be.

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2/20/2013 07:29:50 am

Kylie, I concur with you on the suggested questions. That was really simple for me to understand, obviously, but I'm going to be referring to those questions for gathering my sources on this research paper.

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Emma Chester
2/20/2013 04:26:27 am

In chapter 6, I found "Remember the Blind Man and the Elephant" (107) really interesting and helpful. It talked about how each blind man touched one part of an elephant and inferred that it was something different altogether. This is showing that in order to understand, we must look at all aspects of something. I can use this information to make sure that when I am researching to look for the whole picture and not necessarily just the part that I think is the most helpful to my thesis. This analogy encouraged me to be more open to information instead of employing my ever-so present "selective reading" skills. The part in chapter 7 that I found the most helpful is the part about identifying truthful and unbiased website (134). Checking for .gov or .edu addresses is a great way to make sure that what I am reading is not only helpful, but correct, and the general rules of deciding if the websites are reliable is beneficial as well. I can use this when looking for a website to use in my research paper.

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Kaytlynn Toering
2/20/2013 06:23:28 am

I found the Blind Elephant example helpful too. It's crazy how that happened and how quickly assume that someone else is wrong. This is a great tool to consider when finding sources and seeing how accurately the information matches up!

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David Tarnowski
2/20/2013 10:49:35 am

Yah, I thought that the elephant story was an ingenious way to get their point across. I never really thought of spin like that.

Evan Scieszka
2/20/2013 05:53:13 am

Considering that the upcoming paper that we are going to write is based on a controversial topic, more then likely many sources that we find may only give biased and false information. This is why I found the “Not all studies are equal” section very informative. It points out how people can use guessing and misleading facts to make the argument seem completely in their favor. One example the book shows is when they showed that Mitch Snyder claimed, “more than 3 million Americans could be homeless” (110). This was false and it taught to always check whom the person writing the article is and if they have something to prove. Additionally it taught me to just use common sense and not always believe numbers from a study if they are thrown at me. The part of chapter 7 that I found useful was when it talks about reliable sources on the internet since that is what we will be using a lot of for our research. It listed a couple reputable news sources like CNN and gave a list of reliable websites. It also says that that finding an article also requires doing research on certain claims or “due diligence” (144). This taught me to not only make sure that the people writing the articles are reputable, but also the sites themselves as well.

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Evan Pille
2/20/2013 09:06:12 am

I agree. Most of what we find will not be un-biased so it's up to us to find what is and best represents both sides.

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Kaytlynn Toering
2/20/2013 06:21:09 am

Wow. Super long section to get through. I found these two chapters very beneficial to the assigned paper. In chapter 6, I thought the subject was perfect for beginning the research process. Most importantly, Saying It Doesn't Make it So, really opened my eyes to a new idea. All of the time people try to sell you things or convince you of something because they repeat it over and over again. This is not the case!! I learned repetition does not make something true, and that I have to closely examine my information to find the truth inside my topic (115-117). One other important section in this chapter was Remember the Blind Elephant. This section taught me that I have to get the whole extent of what my research is saying so that I understand everything and can use it to support my statements about my topic (107-111). By doing so, I'm not judging anything too quickly and finidng things that will create the argument in my paper. In chapter 7, the most beneficial section was Finding the Good Stuff beginning on page 131. This covers so many things such as using reliable internet websites and the tricks to determine whether or not the information is legit. On page 148, it mentions numerous questions that people can use to determine how reliable the cite is. One statement made stood out particularly to me: "In general, the less a website tells you about itself in its "About Us" section, the less you should trust it" (148). I had never thought about this before and it makes sense. Learning as much as you can about the creator of the piece helps determine how reliable the piece is AND how the piece will work for you. I plan to use this strategy in my paper to improve my sources.

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Ravi Shah
2/20/2013 06:47:04 am

I agree with Kaytlynn about these chapters. Repetition is a good thing to look for if you want to know whether a piece of information is true or not, because repetition could mean that the author is trying to cover something up. I also agree with the analysis of chapter 7, and how you should look into the websites you are using for research before you cite the information.

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Kasey S
2/20/2013 10:36:27 am

I agree your interpretation of “remember the blind men and the elephant”. I didn’t think of it like that but now thinking about it I do agree. Also I agree that it’s important to look into your sources.

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Kaity Wade
2/20/2013 11:20:30 am

I totally missed the quote on page 148 that you cited. That is totally true though, the less it says about it, the less it should be trusted. I've never really thought about looking at the "About us" when I find information. I guess I will now.

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Ravi Shah
2/20/2013 06:42:59 am

These two chapters of un-Spun appear to be very helpful with regards to the upcoming research paper. Chapter 6 had many helpful hints when it comes to looking at information that has possible biases, which is very much apparent in the topics for our research papers. The "Blind Man and the Elephant," (107) was very helpful, because it teaches that any information can be understood differently by many people, so it is best to trust proven facts based on many observations than ideas based on a single observation.This chapter also reminds the readers that they should always be looking out for other forms of spin, like with the "Cold Eze" scandal (118). They used weasel words and superlative swindles, and even flat out lies to convince people to buy their medicine, simply because of a few isolated "clinical" tests that were later proven false. Chapter 7 was informative on how to sort through information on the internet to decide what information is true, and what information can be used productively. The part about blogs I thought was especially true, since those are all people's opinions, and should not be referenced in serious essays generally (142). All of this was informative and useful information to have before we start doing research for our argumentative papers, and I think this will all be helpful to me.

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Alex Forsythe
2/20/2013 06:47:40 am

I agree about the "Blind Man and the Elephant" topic. Just because somebody believes evidence they've found to be true doesn't necessarily mean that it is in fact true. It's best to rely on professional sources to tell whether information is true or not.

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Alex Forsythe
2/20/2013 06:44:35 am

These two chapters will be very useful in my research I will be doing in this upcoming paper. In chapter 6, the topic of convergent evidence stuck out to me the most. "When different methods arrive at similar estimates, those estimates are more credible" (113). Talking about convergent evidence, the book gives an example of the amount of homeless people being measured in the United States. Mitch Snyder claimed that there were millions of homeless people in the USA when in reality the amount is in the hundred thousands (112). Snyder tried to compare an estimate to the U.S. Census Bureau and found that he was very wrong. One cannot compare their own facts to facts that have been proven. I found chapter 7 to be much more helpful than chapter 6. In chapter 7, it mostly focuses on which sets are credible for their information. "The 'edu' in the domain name is short for 'education,' and only universities, colleges, and other accredited institutions of higher learning are allowed to use it" (136). This is great because while researching, if one went to an educational website, they would know that the information would be correct. Using sites like Wikipedia can sometimes be sketchy because anyone can change the information at any point in time. Another thing I thought to be important in this chapter was when the book listed "Who's behind it?" "Who's paying?" And finally, "Who are the people?" (147-151). Each section states information that will allow one to figure out if the information can be considered credible for use. If one doesn't know the person or where it came from, chances are it was made up. I will apply this information that I've learned in these two chapters by making sure I only visit credible sites so that there will be no chances of misinformation. Educational and organizational sites are the best ones to visit first to reassure myself I will be on the right track.

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2/20/2013 07:17:11 am

Alex, I agree with you when you said you found chapter seven more helpful than chapter six. The website section was very helpful especially with our upcoming project. The information given will be very valuable for us.

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Alex Miller
2/20/2013 11:21:46 am

I agree with Alex when Snyder states that facts cannot be compared to other facts. I will find this statement very helpful for my research paper.

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2/20/2013 07:11:53 am

Although Unspun has not been my favorite book we have read this year, each and every chapter continues to educate me, these last two chapters included. The most striking thing about this whole book is the fact that we so easily fall for these seemly mindless types of deception. One of the things I will take away from chapter six is the lesson titled “Remember the Blind Men and the Elephant,” I found this lesson to be very relatable to many situations in my life. A quote I thought had some meaning in this section was “The lesson here is that sometimes what you don’t know or haven’t been told is more important than what you have seen with your own eyes” (Jackson and Jamieson 108). Chapter seven again gave a huge insight to the growing world of deception out on the internet. The section “Finding the Good Stuff” stuck out to me the most this chapter. The section started off by saying that “The internet is pure anarchy: more information is available more readily than ever before…” (Jackson and Jamieson 131). As the section continues it gives examples and insight how to define a good website from a not so good website. And because there is so many different way to get information nowadays this section was very helpful with approaching our research project coming up. As we begin to search for sources I will be asking myself and looking at the sources I choose in detail to make sure the questions they presented in the book like “What’s their reputation?, Who’s behind it?, or Who’s paying?” (Jackson and Jamieson 149). I can use these to see if they all match up to the sources to help me decide whether or not it is reliable source for information.

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Evan Scieszka
2/20/2013 07:21:45 am

I agree about the "Finding the Good Stuff" part of the book because it really is useful to what we are about to do with the research paper and it provides helpful hints for finding good sites.

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Leland Dunwoodie
2/20/2013 11:24:39 am

Margaret, I, too, found "the Blind Man and the Elephant" to be a relatable topic that taught me about deception. I like your insightful analysis of the chapters. You really seem to be able to understand the message and recreate it in everyday terms that all can comprehend.

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Austin Latack
2/20/2013 07:26:14 am

In chapter 6, I found the "Blind Man and the Elephant" to not only be very interesting, but also applicable to my upcoming research paper. The moral of this section was essentially “sometimes what you don’t know or haven’t been told is more important than what you have seen with your own eyes” (108). I can apply this for when I research by staying open minded to the true facts and keeping my feelings and opinions out of the entire mix. My topic is "Cell Phones in School," and I love to use my cell phone all the time in school. But by "discovering what I haven't been told" about the negatives and positives of the matter, it will allow my paper to be the best that it can factually.
In chapter 7, I discovered that, indeed, not all resources are credible, especially those from the Web. I too found out that "the 'edu' in the domain name is short for 'education,' and only universities, colleges, and other accredited institutions of higher learning are allowed to use it" (136). This shows that in order to get an 'edu' in the domain name, an organization must be approved and credible to receive that prestigious, outstanding classification. This will help me when I do research online, because I will know that I will not have to look and think twice about the credibility of information coming from a resource from one of those sites.

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Mason Freehling
2/20/2013 10:31:13 am

I understand what you are saying and I too feel that the "Blind Man and the Elephant" section will be useful for all topics, especially Cell Phones in School. By leaning more towards one side of the argument, it makes for a much more difficult argumentative piece, but by reviewing the positives and negatives, the piece will be much better.

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2/20/2013 07:53:55 am

These two chapters were very long and hard to get through but are going to be very beneficial for this research paper. While most of the examples were all political and hard to fully understand, I could take a few things from these two chapters and apply them to my research paper. The "Blind Men and the Elephant" lesson was helpful because it showed me that everyone will offer something that is relatively true but isn't the truth as a whole (Jackson and Jamieson 107). Also, the questions from the lesson "Not All "Studies" Are Equal" will be extremely helpful because it gives a list of questions you should ask yourself when you come across a suspicious source: Who stands behind the information? How much guesswork was involved? (Jackson and Jamieson 111). These questions will come in handy. In chapter seven, "Finding the Good Stuff" was really helpful as well: "assume that anonymous or untraceable claims are false until proven otherwise" (Jackson and Jamieson 131). This rule will help rule out many questionable sources. I'm excited to be able to apply the lessons and rules I've read about to this research paper.

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Samir Shah
2/20/2013 09:39:16 am

I agree with Haley. I like how you mentioned the "Blind Men and the Elephant" and showed how even though somethings might be partially true, they may not be true as a whole. I also like how you mentioned the "Not All "Sturdies"Are Equal." Nice job.

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Samir Shah
2/20/2013 08:35:29 am

The past two chapters have been very helpful towards my research. I learned that even though information may be presented with some study, it may not be true. One example of this is when the authors talk about Mitch Snyders “Meaningless” numbers. Snyder’s study said that 3 million of the American population was homeless, and the cause was thought to be republican policies. It turns out that after looking into homelessness, economists found that there was between 444,000 and 842,000 people homeless, and this was backed by other studies. The authors of the book go on to say, “When different methods arrive at similar estimates, those estimates are more credible”(page 113). I thought that this piece of information was especially helpful because I learned that if I found sources that hold the same information, it would for sure be credible. Along with that, I learned that to find good information, we have to check to see if the sources are credible. This is because, “ Constant repetition of a claim may have caused people to believe it, but repetition didn’t make it true”(page 116).

Chapter 7 was just as eye opening as chapter 6. I liked how the main focus was on the credibility of the sources. I liked the example of the Osama, Ollie, and Al. The authors talked about these different sources that all said they could have prevented the twin towers attack. They say that because of the Internet, information, both true and false, can travel much faster and reach more people. The credibility of the sources who said they could have stopped the attack was very low, and after consulting them, America learned that none of them were true. I learned a lot from this chapter because it showed that information with the worst credibility comes from the Internet. Now, when looking for my sources I will double check with other Internet, or book sources to know if the information I am using is credible.

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Kelsey Berndt
2/20/2013 10:07:29 am

Even after reading these chapters I didn't think of double checking sources with other sources, but that is a smart idea.

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Evan Pille
2/20/2013 09:04:08 am

Chapter 6 will certainly aid me in my research in respect to anecdotes. The lessen given is "Don't confuse anecdotes with data", that's pretty sound advice. As I delve into looking at what the U.N. has done in the past 60 years, I'm sure that I'll find plenty of anecdotes telling how the U.N. had done great deeds as well as bad ones. the thing that I need to remember is that these stories just represent a small fraction of what the U.N. has been involved in and don't represent a large set of data.


Chapter 7 should be of even greater help considering the focus is on internet research. While internet research will obviously not be the only part of my research, it will certainly play an important role when finding sources. because of this, I plan on taking the suggestions from "Un-spun", and use them to discern the credibility of whatever I find on the Web.

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Kathleen Risk
2/20/2013 10:08:38 am

Yeah I agree that there will be a lot of anecdotes about the U.N. - and a lot of biased information. A lot of people feel very strongly for or against the U.N., so you should have fun digging through all that!

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Collin Halamka
2/20/2013 10:12:56 am

I agree with both of you. Chapter seven is definitely going to be useful in not only this project but really any time you're on the internet. A lot of the stuff out there is just blatantly false, and now you can use "Unspun" logic to not trust websites that look like they were made with paint

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Kelsey Berndt
2/20/2013 10:02:39 am

These two chapters offer tons of information on successfully navigating the research process. I particularly liked the "Remember the Blind Men and the Elephant" section in Chapter 6, however, the most helpful information, I would have to say, is under the "Not All 'Studies' Are Equal" (111). The questions listed here such as "Who stands behind the information?" and "How old are the data?" definitely are something to be considered when writing a research paper. Chapter 7 also had many questions that would certainly be good to ask yourself while finding sources. The thing I took away from this chapter was the list of tips on finding a credible website (150). I thought these would be very helpful in finding sources. Writing the research paper it would be smart to apply the questions presented. Specifically, questions about who is giving the information would be important to ask in order to write a paper honestly presenting both sides of the argument.

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Zoey Holmstrom
2/20/2013 10:45:15 am

I agree with you, Kelsey. I liked how chapter 7 laid out all of those questions that you could ask after finding a source. I like the thorough explanation of each question too. The authors really make sure in this book that their audience knows what they are talking about!

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Collin Halamka
2/20/2013 10:05:42 am

A lot of this book is extremely relevant to what we're about embark on. In chapter six, it talks a lot about research and such. It talks about evaluating evidence. How a lot of ads use things like "preferred two to one" (123) or "clinically proven to cut cold symptoms by 42 percent" (120) Most of these things are just weasal words that aren't actually true, and just serve to lure you in and buy their product or whatever else they're selling. When I am researching, I now know to look for things like this to denote faulty sources. In chapter seven they talked a great deal about the internet. This chapter will be exceptionally useful when doing my research, and in the rest of my life. It talked about how most are reliable, they don't "suggest that everything you find on a dot-gov website should be believed..." (135). It also states "Blogs can be useful, but... they tend to be biased..." (141). When researching anything in life, this chapter has helped me know what to trust on the internet.

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Jared Wendland
2/20/2013 10:24:27 am

I also noticed that in these chapter how they keeper pushing the idea of verifying. Especially the website we visit and not just assuming that just because its .gov to trust it.

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Sara Buckle
2/20/2013 11:48:06 am

I liked when it talked about blogs, too. Anyone can say anything they want to on the internet, and personal blogs definitely haven't proved to be a place to get the most accurate information.

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Kathleen Risk
2/20/2013 10:06:21 am

In chapter six, one of the sections that made an impression on me was “An Abortion Distortion.” It reminded me of how some people can be highly influential with facts they simply made up. I mean, Glen Harold Stassen, the guy how came up with the study that supposedly showed a rise in abortions, used terrible techniques, and a few of his sources were proved unreliable. I liked the fact that the authors used a graph with solid information from the Guttmacher Institute to prove the abortion claim wrong. What I want to take away to benefit me in my research paper is that I hope that I check that I am using reliable sources for my information. In chapter seven, the part that intrigued me the most was the example of the Bin Laden email. I had never heard of such email, and it seems to have been a huge scandal. Also, the hunt for Osama Bin Laden has been of interest to me recently, mostly because I have seen Zero Dark Thirty twice. But this example just goes to show how readily people can be to accept something that puts someone they dislike into a bad light. I’m surprised people were fooled by it for so long- the authors point out that a simple google search gives you multiple articles that disprove it, and even Oliver North spoke out that it was completely false! To apply this to my project, I am going to be much more careful about bringing in and analyzing counter arguments even if I disagree with them. Unspun will definitely be able to help me with my research project. I am going to make sure that I use reliable sources- for the sources I have found so far, I have made sure they are from reliable newspapers or organizations like NASA (my topic is Space Exploration and Travel). It will also be able to help me to take an unbiased view on subjects I have opinions on.

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Jared Wendland
2/20/2013 10:17:45 am

In the chapters six and seven the authors seem to tie everything together. With the skills from previous chapters the authors move onto identifying fact from fiction in more depth. In chapter six one key idea I drew from it was watching out for false credibility. They talk about how one should analyze the persons validity before taking their word. One example they use is how actor Bruce Willis endorsement of President George W. Bush and his war in Iraq(122). Just because he is an action hero doesn't mean that his opinions are makes sense. As for chapter seven learning about what website types are credible stayed with me. In the book they talk about how one should take note of who is backing the website, and if they are reliable(131-32). Does the person making the claims publish under their real name.The the authors continue, they address .edu sites. They talk about how in some cases college students are just given their own domains(134).Just because it is .edu doesn't necessarily mean it is credible, always confirm sources . These things collectively built on how I look at what a legitimate online source is.I feel these specific ideas could be helpful in my search for sources being able to see through the false credibility as well.

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Evan Kiel
2/20/2013 11:10:31 am

I really would of trusted .edu sources before it really changes things because I doubt many people realize the chance they have of being wrong

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Michael Gorton
2/20/2013 12:33:26 pm

I completely agree. You should always run a background check on information given by an unfamiliar site because you cannot always trust it to be accurate.

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Owen Carow
2/20/2013 07:18:35 pm

Yes, I also thought that these chapters seem to be sort of a practical application of the warning signs and techniques we have been learning about. I definitely think misleading websites are going to be an issue for some of our classmates, especially those with more controversial subjects, or subjects whose authors can have a stake in the issue already.

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Marcus Shannon
2/20/2013 10:20:56 am

Both chapters 6 and 7 screamed at me to watch where I get my information from. What I particularly liked was a lesson in chapter 6 “Not All “Studies” Are Equal”, and the tips it gave to identify misleading information. Questions that dealt with how long ago was the research done or what method was used are great things to think about. Continuing with chapter 7’s message of finding reliable research and sources on the internet was pretty straight forward. It shows how fast false information, like Oliver North’s supposed warning, can spread and grow out of control. Now what I’m taking away from these both is even when I find sources I believe are true I need to still look into the information. Concerning what I get from the internet I’ll be extra careful with that. Most things from the internet needs to be questioned just because of the nature of the way anything can be uploaded.

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Jeremy M. Barker, The
2/20/2013 12:46:13 pm

You're totally right with the chapter six having neat tips with its question, and I too find that valuable. Also I would very much agree with you that they focus mainly on reliability in both chapters. Especially in chapter seven was reliability on the authors of a source.

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Mason Freehling
2/20/2013 10:25:21 am

First off, this book should have plenty of resources to further our use of resources during the upcoming research project. One thing that stood out to me in chapter six was the “Not All ‘Studies’ Are Equal” lesson. Especially including the 49ers story, when something out of the ordinary occurs all hell breaks loose. People jump to conclusions faster than they can publish them and for no logical reason. As the book states, many questions must be asked of the data and how it is relevant to the situation. As for chapter seven, the “Due Diligence” section stood out as to how products can actually deceive people. If somebody were truly interested in a product, then they would want to research it and this section tells people how to do exactly that. Most likely I will incorporate this most recent piece into my research project. By asking several questions of different variations of sources, I should be able to get the most out of my sources.

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David Tarnowski
2/20/2013 10:48:15 am

I totally agree with what you said. I also totally forgot to mention the fact that the book offered tons of really useful resources throughout it, and especially in these two chapters. These are all sources that would probably be a good thing to use when writing our paper.

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Kasey Shoemaker
2/20/2013 10:34:11 am

In chapter 6, in the lesson of “Remember the blind men and the elephant”, I found the statement “our personal experience seldom gives us a full picture” to stand out. This stood out as a helpful reminder for when doing research to not only consider our opinions. Both chapters talk about evidence and being certain about it. At the end of chapter 6, it says, “keep asking, “What’s the evidence?”” This is also a good thought to consider during research. All throughout chapter 7 Jackson and Jamieson discuss how reliable and accurate internet sources are. They continue to elaborate on how to evaluate whether this evidence is true or not. To apply all of this to our research paper, I will be looking at the evidence presented and looking at how true the evidence is.

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Rachel T
2/20/2013 11:18:49 am

I like that line "keep asking "What is the evidence?"" It is a very good line to remember as we go back and work on these research papers over the next few weeks.

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David Tarnowski
2/20/2013 10:45:43 am

These two chapters as a whole, were incredibly informative and they offered a vast store of knowledge that will come in handy when writing my research paper. So, to begin...
1) The one big thing that I can take from Chp. 6 is the difference between evidence and anecdotes. This idea was explored throughout the entire chapter and it was explained very well. I never really thought about looking at that sort of thing when looking at sources. This is how Chp. 6 can help me when I am writing my research paper. I now know to look at the sources I choose for this project from a different perspective. It has opened my eyes to the fact that you have to question your sources to determine whether they are good to use. Especially helpful from this chapter will be the list of questions on page 111. These are the sort of things that I will ask myself as I look for my sources. Chp, 7 was really informative in its own way. It covered the idea of the Internet as a good source, if used properly. This is something that we are always being told, "anyone can put anything on the internet." Althought this is true that doesn't make it a bad source. This chapter was important in terms of the research project because we are required to use at least one trustworthy internet source in our paper. Chapter 7 helps with this in pages 144-149. It offers a list of questions to ask yourself when determining whether a website is a trustworthy source. This is a list that will be very useful when trying to find good sources for the paper.

2) I guess I kind of tied the two parts together, but the main thing that I will take away from this book, and these two chapters in particular, is the fact that YOU MUST ASK QUESTIONS! Many things are not as they seem or you are only being offered a half truth. Asking questions will reveal these spins. So, like I said this is something that I will start to do as I dwelve back into the research process.

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Zoey Holmstrom
2/20/2013 10:59:06 am

UnSpun hasn't been the most exciting book that I've read, but it has presented a lot of information that will be useful to me in my future. In Chapter 6, I liked the tiny section right before the "remember the Blind Men and the Elephant" section. In this paragraph, the authors write, "our own personal experience isn't necessarily very good evidence" (Jackson and Jamieson 110). It also goes on to say that sometimes, we base all of our facts on things that we've seen or touched. This produces false information. This leads into the section called "Remember the Blind Men and the Elephant". Here, the authors write, "personal experience seldom gives us a full picture" (Jackson and Jamieson 111). This furthers the point that just because we've had an experience with something, it doesn't give us the right to base all of our facts on that one experience. This will be helpful in my research because I'll know to broaden my facts and evidence not on things that have happened to me in my own life, but other reliable sources.
In Chapter 7, there were lots of places that pointed out the same topic. On page 131, Jackson and Jamieson write that "finding the right websites" and "knowing how to evaluate their reliability" is the key to finding legitimate facts and figures to put into an argument. Preceeding this on pages 144-150, many questions are listed for the audience to consider when checking the legitimacy of a website and it's facts (Jackson and Jamieson). I really liked all of the questions they listed. I wrote them down on a seperate sheet of paper to keep next to me while doing my research. This will truly help me determine how I will know if information is in fact true, or it's just something that some random person on the Internet made up. Overall, this book does a very good job of explaining how to recognize spin, and how to know what things are facts and what are not.

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Courtney Bennett
2/20/2013 12:14:41 pm

I agree with you on how Chapter 6 did a good job of helping us to recognize evidence outside of personal experiences. It's hard for me to see past something if I already have a strong opinion of it or if an experience influenced my views. Chapter 6 made me more aware of biases I would not have normally thought that I even had.

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Carley Grau
2/20/2013 07:49:48 pm

I feel the same about chapter 6, I also want to believe everything I see on a firsthand experience rather than other views. It showed to look at other research before judging so strongly.

Evan Kiel
2/20/2013 11:07:09 am

the book offers many helpful ideas about the best ways to make sure you are not being spun by faulty information and how to find out if information is not true especially in these two chapters. Chapter 6 shows us more of the warning signs we are going to have to look for as we start our research project. The idea that anecdotes are not data will make me look deeper and check the studies done and make sure they actually exist and are not just what one person said. Chapter 7 helps with actually finding reliable information and the questions to ask yourself as you are looking at information for this research project or anything like it. It gives us many reliable sources for different information and on how to find others on our own. The avoidance of bias is probably the most important because of the topics with government and the environment. This can be applied most to the internet source part of the research project because most of the sirs information is going to be from reliable sources but we need to do background on the sources we find on the internet to see what they might gain from portraying information a certain way.

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Rachel Tuller
2/20/2013 11:12:59 am

In chapter six, I think the most beneficial thing that came out of it was the questions that are listed on page 111. To me, these questions are good tools to think of when trying to discover how the information is accurate or not. However, in chapter seven, there were times when I felt like it was kind of telling us what we already know. Because we have grown up with the Internet at our fingertips, most of us know not to trust everything out there. However, it did strike me as odd that government sites don't always tell the full truth. As we go through this next paper, I will probably go back to the questions on 11 as well as the anecdotes not being data(105). Both of those things should be helpful in writing this next paper.

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Katelyn Tillstrom
2/20/2013 11:16:45 am

Those questions on 111 are awesome! They practically sum up what we're supposed to look out for. They are definitely something to refer to during the process of writing this paper. Especially the one that asks how old the data are. Something could be completely irrelevant by the time we read it and we won't know it unless we check.

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Katelyn Tillstrom
2/20/2013 11:13:26 am

What I mainly got out of chapter six was to not be biased or use my own experience or opinion as data, and to check the sources. Also, just because someone says it doesn’t mean it’s true, because they’re most likely being biased themselves. For example, in the crow study, one sighting was used as the first assumption that crows are smart enough to use cars to crack walnuts (103-105). The same goes for the “clinically proven” Cold-Eeze study. One experiment worked, and that’s what they used to sell their product. However, the rest did not end up the same (119). Advertisers may use appeal to authority to get their point across, even if the celebrity has nothing to do with the product (123). This is an example of someone saying something, and it’s not necessarily true. In the end, I learned to always check the sources. No matter what I’m looking at, especially on a controversial subject for my paper, I need to see where the information came from, because it may be biased, or completely based on anecdote. The seventh chapter essentially says the same thing, except it focuses on the internet. It comes right out and says that “the solution to spin is the internet…” followed by “…if you use it very carefully” (127). The internet allows us to find out whatever we want to know. This makes it easy to get to the sources, if there are any. Websites can also be biased, especially if it’s a blog (142). But the authors explained the idea of “dot-edu” and “dot-gov,” and if there is an “About Us” section, which can help us realize that they’re the right people or sites to trust (136, 147). This is definitely helpful when it comes to my paper. I can figure out if certain websites are full of useful, unbiased information, rather than just a blogger expressing his or her views. This will allow me to find the right sources for my paper

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Danielle Curley
2/20/2013 09:42:17 pm

I agree with you on being biased about information and that you should check it .. I tend to take what I know already into effect

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Kaity Wade
2/20/2013 11:14:44 am

Overall, chapters 6 and 7 taught me not to trust anything easily when doing research. The main thing that I took from chapter 6 was that many claimed case studies are merely anecdotes. On page 110, they talk about how Mitch Snyder presented the fabricated numbers in order to bash the Reagan administration. Sadly, they made the point that people will still believe this falsely gathered, inaccurately studied information even after it has been disproved (111). I was shocked when they talked about how many facts and products that are advertised as "tested" are not considered data, just an anecdote. I took away that unless I can see the different cases laying in front of me to judge for myself if they are accurate, they are no more accurate than crows having a high IQ (103). In chapter 7, these authors reinstated what I already knew to be true about the validity in website searching, and research gathering. Basically, these authors told me that every piece of information on the internet needs to be researched pretty thoroughly because it all could be untrue, regardless of what comes after the "dot". I already knew not to easily trust these websites, but chapter seven gave good questions to ask: who is giving the information, who is paying for it, what are they selling, what is their reputation, and can I verify (144-149). As we take a step into this next research paper, I will use the one thing that this book has taught me above anything else: nothing can be trusted. I no longer will be so easy in trusting the information the sources give me, and I will more carefully examine the facts being stated by the questions this book has given. This research paper will probably contain more accurate information because of my new found skepticism.

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Dylan Gustafson
2/20/2013 11:20:26 am

It's funny, I was going to talk about anecdotes, but I felt that i would go on some sort of tangent with it. Anyways, after you said that the book listed many different facts that were "tested," I had to look back for myself and I realized you were completely right on that part. There are a lot of facts said to be just "tested" and not actually proven, so I thank you for making me recognize that.

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Alex Miller
2/20/2013 11:15:17 am

One thing I could take away from chapter six is "Not All 'Studies' Are Equal" ( Jackson and Jameson 111). The section mentioned questions like " Who stands behind the information...how old is the data?" (111) that question the legitimacy of studies that advertisements use and will help me question the legitimacy of the research that mentions studies from doctors. This lesson will coincide with my research by having doctors and surgeries that have studies that show cosmetic surgery for teens is right. In chapter seven in mentions that the internet is a good way to catch spin but only with reliable sources (127). There is a website given, " www.lii.org" (141) that will be very helpful in my research so I can use only reliable resources and not be spinned so my project will be correct. These two chapters will help me find reliable resources for the paper.

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Dylan Gustafson
2/20/2013 11:16:01 am

First of all, I thought that both chapters were equally informative, not really shocking and amazing, but informative enough to help my paper. In chapter six, I liked the section titled, "Not All "Studies" Are Equal," because it basically said that just because one study said it doesn't mean that another did (112). Also, that other study could be more accurate than the first one. I don't remember if it was in this section or not, but I think it said that some studies can be biased towards what the author thinks is right. What I can take from this is a better understanding of reading through articles/sources for the paper. Let's say that one article I find seems to be good, but actually ends up totally biased against what I am arguing. This may make for a good rebuttal, but not for my proving part. In chapter seven, I liked where it said to just search the internet for evidence on such topic, to make sure it is true. Also, to look for "dot-gov" or "edu" in the address to see that only top colleges or websites from the government use them (134). No more taking the chance and winging it. Like I said before, now that I know a lot more about finding the truth in articles, internet searches will have to happen more to bring the truth out in articles, and even if the article sounds good, you cannot trust it completely.

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Taylor Dale
2/20/2013 11:31:31 am

I looked over that section again for biased thing and did not see it, I may have missed it, but I remember reading it. I would have to aggree about now being able to tell if an article is biased or not and being able to use it.

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Taylor Dale
2/20/2013 11:16:43 am

These two chapters offer lots off help for the upcoming research paper. One thing that I can take away from both chapters is the questions to ask myself considering the relevance of the research. In chapter six, unspun provides questions when considering factual claims in studies in “Lesson: Not All ‘Studies’ Are Equal” (111). Chapter seven asks similar questions except they are for considering the accuracy of websites, in the “Due Diligence” section (143- 150). These will help me decide which article and resources are the most reliable and the best ones to use in my paper. I will ask myself these questions to do so. Chapter six also gives great examples, the lessons, to know what to look for. One lesson gives key words to look for in the “Appeals to Popularity” section of the “case Study: Is Cold-Eeze ‘Clinically Proven?’”(123). I will be able to find specific words and phrases that create fallacies.

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Leland Dunwoodie
2/20/2013 11:20:38 am

Chapter 6 taught me that an expert in one field may not be trustworthy in another. Through the example of a Nobel Prize-winning chemist that promotes vitamin-C to cure the common cold, Jackson and Jamieson prove their point that "an authority in one field isn't necessarily qualifed in another" (122). This notion changed the way I view advertisements; an expert in one field promoting a product in another now seems silly to me.
What struck me in Chapter 7 is the absence of many news stories on the Internet. It amazed me that most publishers "got in the habit of charging money for written transcripts of their broadcasts long ago, and most still don't post such transcripts on their websites" (138) and that services such as Nexis or Factiva need to be consulted for accuracy.
These two chapters will be helpful to my research because they taught me to be wary of information, no matter how solid the data seems to be, and to thoroughly check the credibility of the author and the scholarly acceptance of the information before proceeding to trust the information. I now have a better understanding of what is trustworthy data and what is not trustworthy data.

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Jordon Young
2/20/2013 11:51:36 am

I found the section about experts interesting too. Couldn't a company say something like: "Nine out of ten experts would recommend our cat food." Experts of what? They could be llama experts for all we know. Maybe even politicians!

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Caitlin Morgan
2/20/2013 11:58:27 am

I know that whenever I see an intelligent person on television promoting something I tend to neglect any thought as to how they may be qualified for saying such. I just recognize a face or a name and trust whatever they spit out. That portion of the chapter really opened my eyes as well. I feel almost ignorant for not recognizing this logical flaw before now, actually.

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Sara Buckle
2/20/2013 11:38:10 am

Something that caught my attention in Chapter 6 is the lesson, "Not All 'Studies' Are Equal." My topic is vegetarianism, which will ask whether or not it is a healthy diet. Asking questions about the data and information I get from my research will benefit me greatly, because I'll think more about how qualified the person giving it to me is, whether or not it is outdated, and if assumptions about the diet are being made that don't necessarily connect. Chapter 7 gave me a lot more knowledge about internet sources which I am glad for, because it's difficult to pick and choose what is a trustworthy source on the web. I've always thought that .edu meant for sure that the source was accurate, but I read, "...the dot-edu extension is no guarantee of accuracy," (137) which surprised me. Knowing that things can be posted to these sites by a single professor or even students. I'll definitely look into those sources more after reading that.

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2/21/2013 12:04:14 am

I agree about dot-edu sites. I assumed they knew what they were talking about. The thing about Un-spun is that the authors always use the examples of professors at reputable universities making nonsense claims. I am more hesitant to accept the findings of people with credentials.

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Jordon Young
2/20/2013 11:46:45 am

For finding sources, the quote, "The plural of 'anecdote' is not 'data'," from chapter six, will help me sort through firsthand accounts, and interviews for my argument(105), and the, "look for a 'dot-gov'," advice to find information from the CDC or statistics from a credible source(134). I've never thought about if the sources that we've been getting from databases are credible or biased before. They must be credible, but I'm sure there are more than enough sources that were written by biased authors. I'm going to be extra careful when on Sirs because the sources are split up into sources for or against the argument. Are they on one particular side because of the facts or because of the authors?

The above two examples will help me with finding sources to form my argument, but what shocked me the most is "Rick Snyder's 'Meaningless' Numbers,"(110). Sure, he just made up numbers, which our politicians can legally do; that's not the valuable information. What I found shocking is that there are so many government organizations that are so trusted, and so available on the internet that never received any attention from me. I would never have thought to check what politicians are saying about bills with the congress website––the people voting on it. It seems like it should have been common sense. Next time I need to see if one of Obama's bills is actually doing what he says it will, I can just go check with a not-partisan ".gov" website.

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Caitlin Morgan
2/20/2013 11:49:43 am

I found both chapters to be equally beneficial in terms of the upcoming research paper. Like a lot of others, I enjoyed the questions listed on page 111, and the “Guide to Testing Evidence” on page 121 of chapter 6. The set-up of these examples made comprehension of their lessons much more attainable considering the basic, bullet-pointed format. Unfortunately, I must admit to falling into the trap of accepting anecdotes as data, and even more so, accepting unknown sources from the internet. Chapter 7 was especially vital for me in drawing attention to this, for I now know what to look for when verifying sources. Information should be extracted from the site only once it has been scanned in terms of credibility and experience in the given field rather than popularity and flashy statistics. I also never gave much thought to analyzing how a site’s publishers’ political stance, or social stature may affect the nature of the article, and subsequently how it may sway my views as well. The “Finding the Good Stuff” section of chapter 7, beginning on page 131, was a huge relief after reading about all of the internet traps I could potentially fall into.

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Courtney Bennett
2/20/2013 12:01:47 pm

After reading Chapter Six, I feel more equipped to recognize credible evidence. I thought it was interesting that “... our own personal experience isn't necessarily very good evidence” (106). Even though we often think of ourselves as a reliable source, we mistake anecdotes for data. This causes us to actually mislead ourselves through our own filtered mindsets. This is important to be aware of as we begin our research because we will be able to examine the opposing side more efficiently without being blinded by our own experiences with the issue. The lesson “Extraordinary Claims Need Extraordinary Evidence” will also be beneficial to bear in mind while researching. The sources we find will undoubtedly be biased one way or the other, and I'm definitely going to be more skeptical of extreme statistics or claims. In Chapter Seven I learned how to utilize the internet to examine the credibility of sources. I learned to look for websites with authority, such as government websites (134). I also learned to always be wary of biased websites, such as blogs. This will be useful to check facts and statistics while researching. In short, I will employ an unbiased and open-minded mindset while researching yet at the same time remain initially skeptical of claims.

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Michael Gorton
2/20/2013 12:29:11 pm

As usual, I found found this book to be most helpful in identifying types of spin. In Chapter 6, I found the most beneficial example for my research paper almost immediately. When the authors discuss the counter-proof related to the false assumption about Crows, I completely agreed with what is being said about needing proof to back up the assumption (105). When looking for sources, I want to distinguish between what may be someone's opinion and what is scientific fact (my topic is hopefully space exploration, but I was absent for call-outs); so that when I do begin to find sources, I will specifically look to see evidence that supports my argument.

This also relates to what I took away from Chapter 7. Ensuring that the source is reliable when searching online is key to avoiding useless threads of pure spin (134-135). By searching for information from government sites linked to NASA or reliable research material, I will have a base for my argument that I can draw support from.

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Jeremy M. Barker
2/20/2013 12:37:42 pm

This continued reading of unSpun is going to somewhat valuable to the current research project. Chapters six and seven really bring out the valid and reliable points in research. In chapter six, for instance, under the "Not All 'Studies' Are Equal" section it shows a series of questions that could be used to check if a sources information is reliable (111). The book's example on the following page is about the number ofhomeless people. It shows how the U.S. Census Bureau only records those at shelters, soup lines, and selected open locations without accounting for anything else and they were inaccurate. By checking for complete information within a source would be more accurate. Next, in chapter seven at the "Due Diligence" section it explains that information is needed to verify that the people, agency, or whoever posted a source are reliable (143). It does this by asking questions such as "What's their reputation?" or checking for footnotes to see where information comes from (144-149). By finding a reliable source, the more accurate the information will tend to be. To apply these into my own research I will definitely ask myself the same questions given throughout both sections that I mentioned. Through that I can decide which sources have valid information by checking that the data is recent, has a reliable person or team responsible for the information with little guesswork. Also, by checking that the information is complete and has few to no assumptions being made will help me find better sources for research.

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Kathleen Janeschek
2/20/2013 12:54:22 pm

In Chapter 6, I found the section anecdotes to be the most compelling (105). All too often in life people are guided not by what data and evidence, but by their own personal experience. Instead of researching and weighting data to decide their opinions on issues, they allow personal anecdotes to cloud their vision. More often than not, when faced with data and contradictory personal narrative, people will choose what they experienced not what is the scientifically determined norm (106). It's a fact of the human mind, but that doesn't mean we can't watch out for it. In Chapter 7, the "Who's behind it?" question was the part I found to be most useful to myself (147). The other things they discussed seemed like common sense, but often when checking out a website, I wouldn't bother with looking for who was actually writing said website. However, I think the book has a valid point about why one should notice who they are getting the information from. I plan on using the various questions about the trustworthiness of websites to evaluate the ones I find during my research project.

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Richard Harris
2/20/2013 01:47:43 pm

Even though I was half-asleep while reading, I felt most of what was mentioned in the two chapters was common sense, especially when it comes to paying attention where you find information. I feel like most people should be able to tell what sources of information seem biased and unbelievable in general.

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Colby Clark
2/20/2013 08:42:13 pm

Although the section on anecdotes seems like common sense, it seems that personal experience is often relied on heavily in our society. It makes sense that people would think that way, but it is not a sound method to draw conclusions.

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Lauren Clem
2/20/2013 09:05:33 pm

I agree with what you say about how people choose what they feel most comfortable and what is well known to them rather than a more credible source because of the little extra work it takes to go out and find it on their own.

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Richard Harris
2/20/2013 01:40:24 pm

The one big thing that I take from reading these chapters is being conscious of the credibility of the sources I plan on using. I will be better prepared to question a source's credibility if its information is the opposite of what all other sources show, like with the scientific writings about the crows. Another thing I will be more aware of are sources that show some kind of bias, which also cause me to question the credibility of a source. I know to make sure I find sources from credible places like government websites (134) or other places that provide evidence to support their claims.

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Jacob DeSutter
2/20/2013 05:45:56 pm

This is probably the second most important message i took from chapters 6&7. It still loops back to the way that anything the seems too "prefect" is most likely not true, and putting a source to a bit of testing before using it is always a good idea. .

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Jacob DeSutter
2/20/2013 05:41:19 pm

If forced to take one, and only one, lesson form these chapters its this-- If the source fits an idea perfectly, then something is wrong. As John Roberts statment "three million homeless in America"(111) proves, the data he was basing his argument on was false, and was far too prefect to actually be real. This is also the trap that Bush's supporters fell into when presented Oliver North's interview with senator Gore and how "Osama Bin Laden is the most evil man alive"(128). This trap is easy to fall into, as it takes pieces of the "root for my side".and that being wrong is difficult to admit. This will make my choice of sources extra-careful, so I can avoid falling into this trap. This, and any source that seems "prefect" will require much scrutinizing before being considered for my paper.

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Justin Marutz
2/20/2013 08:18:39 pm

I agree with Taco on Wiki being a pretty liable source, now back when the book was written it may not have been, but now it seems to be. Blogs can be anyone writing whatever they damn well please.

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Owen Carow
2/20/2013 07:14:57 pm

The book is getting more practical to us students in these two chapters, and I can see myself applying many of the concepts it mentions. The one concept I thought was most interesting from chapter 6 was that one should avoid confusing anecdotes with data (105). I have often heard people quote very insubstantial sources when trying to prove a point, or taking something someone said in passing as gospel. The list on page 121 is also logical, but it seems like more common sense knowledge than something I need to consult during research. Chapter 7 gets more in-depth in terms of identifying reliable sources. It says to look for .gov and .edu addresses, which I cautiously agree with, as these kinds of sources have been very beneficial to me in the past. I was surprised how strongly the book rejected Wikipedia only to talk about some blogs being useful sources (143). After all, if anyone can edit Wikipedia, can't anyone make a blog? At any rate, I thought that the more abstract thing to get from the chapters is that sources who have a stake in what they are telling you about are dangerous to use, such as government sites of a particular party or candidate (135). I will definitely check the extra sources I find against Unspun's standards.

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Zach Grover
2/20/2013 07:38:12 pm

Owen I agree with your first claim especially, I also thought that the lesson on 105 was rather flabbergasting. It really makes you think how many times you've been spun.

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Zachary Grover
2/20/2013 07:36:42 pm

From chapter 6 and 7 it put Unspun into a more practical reference book then it was before. The two biggest sections I took away from were Extraordinary claims need extraordinary evidence, and Don't Confuse Anecdotes with Data. During the Lesson Extraordinary claims, I took away that during research if one simply states, for instance MagnaSoles will heal your foot and give you energy they need credible proof. That's not to say throw a graph in their, it really means that the one making the claim needs to cite actually evidence that they discovered while making the claim.From the other Lesson Don't Confuse, I left me wondering how many times I had read a story and then just accepted it as fact. For all I know the meteor in Russia may have been a UFO and the media is presenting us with an anecdote, but in reality isn't giving any data. poor Russians. The big thing I will take away from this is that while reading articles I need to be persistent when reading, just because an article may look fancy means nothing. It needs to be factual.

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Carley Grau
2/20/2013 07:48:26 pm

In chapter six I found the first study about birds dropping food onto cars to be the most interesting and helpful. It explains how the first thing you encounter can seem very true and real rather than just a coincidence, but that its not also so. This will help me with my research paper that the first piece of research I come by is not always true. In chapter 7 I found it interesting how you don't always check online places to see who made the website etc. It helps show to check resources in the future and reminds of something I never even thought to do.

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Danielle Curley
2/20/2013 07:54:29 pm

These two chapters from Unspun were helpful and will help me in my research process. From chapter six the main thing I found intriguing was "Remember the Blind Man and the Elephant", I made me realize that humans rely on their own experience and don't look at real evidence(pg. 107). From chapter seven I found helpful is on page 134 when they say that it is best to go to a government website for good reliable information. It says to look for a dot-gov. I can use these tips to get better sources that have more reliable information. Now i know not to be "blind" when getting facts and a good place to get sources are government sites. Also from chapter 6 on page 111 the questions are helpful and I will ask myself them when getting sources.

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2/20/2013 07:55:14 pm

Although these chapters were not fun reading, they did provide good information for the researc process. Chapter six was very informitive and gave many warnings for the reader to think about. On page 106 "seeing v believing" was a section that stuck out to me. For the research paper the section made clear that personal experience doesn't qualify as good evidence. That is helpful to make sure I have good resource to support what I think. The opening cartoon in chapter seven gets the reader thinking before the reading. It is to make the reader weary of the information found anywhere. All of chapter seven was als helpful for understading that not all information is valid. B of these chapters were informitive an extremely helpfulo for the upcomin research paper.

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Justin Marutz
2/20/2013 08:16:58 pm

What I took from chapter 6 and 7 were respectable people can just make things up to support their argument and that more so in seven that it is our duty to check, figure out the truth among the crap. The example for false facts is Abortion Distortion where Howard Dean spouts out facts that abortion raised twenty five percent, when in actuality dropped two (p 116). In chapter seven the authors deeply want you to get involved in checking the facts offering methods such as factcheck.org and numerous ways such as asking oneself if this makes sense through a series of questions (p 148). In my quest to thwart Apples good name, I will have to have reliable information in which this book has put me on decent terms. Allowing me to see past the crud and avoid it instead finding the cold hard facts.

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Colby Clark
2/20/2013 08:51:01 pm

These two chapters provide a lot of relevant information pertaining to the upcoming research project. In chapter six I found the anecdote section most relevant (105). This example is something everyone needs to be wary of. It is very difficult to not draw conclusions based on personal experiences, but it is critical (106). Scientific data must be used to draw relevant conclusions. In chapter seven the most useful section to me was the fact checking questions they provided on page 144-149. These are great questions to challenge the truth of sources and to find good reference material.

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Lauren Clem
2/20/2013 09:03:26 pm

As I get ready to write another research paper I’m really glad that I was able to read this book because there was a lot of information in it that can help me write a better paper. Chapter 6 was a very important chapter, and the first thing I picked up on for my upcoming paper was false evidence given by a reliable source in ‘Mitch Snyder’s “Meaningless” Numbers’. “Consider a claim made in 1982 that more than 3 million Americans could be homeless” (110) is a fact that is given by a credible research source, but at the end, the actual truth about the homeless people turns out to be false. They are overgeneralizing when they make the broad statement merely based on judgment. By understanding this now, I can go into my research and find only the true information. Chapter 7 was a continuation to chapter 6 as far as the meaning of honest evidence, but this chapter gave real examples of things to watch out for which is what I really enjoyed. In the ‘Due Diligence’ section, there is a list of bulleted things to notice in every website before you immediately use their information in your own research paper. The “Who’s paying?” bullet was interesting because it really proves what sources are out there to help, and which ones are out there for financial purposes. “In the fine print…” (149) is already a sketchy term, and “… it is likely to reflect the business side,” (149) is something that people need to look out for when trying to find trustworthy information. By looking at the type of people that publish and support a web site in my research paper I can automatically know if the information is good, and if it made for my benefit.

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2/20/2013 11:59:07 pm

Theses chapters show ways people can be more vigilant regarding the sources they use in research. The lesson in chapter 6 on page 111: Not All "Studies " Are Equal . It was a really great way to phrase it. The questions the book poses in this lesson are applicable to what our current task is, which is locating strong evidence to support our argument. Page 122 also interested me, specifically in that gray guide box. One line was, "Do other sources agree, or do they come up with contrary findings? The Cold-Eeze story shows how cherry picked evidence can mislead us". I will definitely keep an eye out for "cherry picked" evidence. Chapter 7 was better because it gave advice for websites which are hard to trust I general. On page 150, it was insightful of the book's authors to suggest people do a little reading to see who the author of a website is, if they are educated on the subject, or if they are just plagiarizing info. Those are very relevant things to ponder when doing research. After reading these chapters I had to reevaluate what sources I was previously going to utilize.

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