In a brief paragraph address the following:

a. What purpose(s) does this introduction serve? (think in terms of rhetorical anylsis, argument, etc)
b. What are your first reactions to the text?

Your paragraph can be a comment on another person's post or stand alone. As long as your response addresses the above in a well-written,  coherent, and thoughtful manner, you will receive full credit.
Maddie Williams
1/29/2013 03:31:20 am

After reading this introduction, it is pretty obvious that Jackson and Jamieson are arguing that after reading "Unspun," readers will be able to catch Spins in the real world. They are not only targeting English students, like us, but also the average American. They state that this book will enable readers to be smarter than the stretched, and left out, statements that they are told everyday, be it from a newspaper, politics, or TV ads. Overall, the intro is trying to say that by reading this book, readers will no longer be decieved. I think thy the intro itself was kind of boring, but It made some really interesting points. I think that I will enjoy the book as it goes on. I'm eager to hear the examples that they say they are going to provide in order to teach us how to catch spins.

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1/29/2013 05:27:53 am

http://thezieglerzone.weebly.com/1/post/2013/01/becoming-unspunblog-1-due-13013-by-beginning-of-class.html#comments

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1/29/2013 05:28:49 am

Opps.. I don't know what happened! I agree with you Maddie on the examples, I think that’s what will make this book so interesting. Seeing what I have believed in the real world that has turned out to be untrue.

Jordon Young
1/29/2013 09:58:17 am

You thought the intro is boring!? I thought it was fun to analyze sentences that tell me that I should analyze more.

To Margaret, I feel like the older I get, I uncover more lies and realize how much I thought I knew about people, but actually don't.

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1/30/2013 12:35:26 am

I agree with you Jordan! I enjoyed the fact that this book is introducing a way to decipher invalid arguments, when technically this introduction was an argument in itself. Jackson and Jamieson are arguing that they can teach us how to recognize spins. They are trying to make us, as the customers, listen to them and not the politicians or the government or media. The authors give many examples of spins, such as the democrats and republicans claims in office, and how they spun the truth to feed it to us. They are appealing to us emotionally and logically by bringing up topics that we all worry and care about such as jobs, our families, and money. I really enjoyed this introduction and am pleased to say that I was analyzing it rhetorically even before I looked at this blog.

Michael Gorton
1/29/2013 11:07:26 am

I completely agree with Maddie! Although the intro was, overall, fairly boring, it introduced a new method of thinking to the reader. I can't wait to read furthur for better examples and different styles of spins.

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Kylie Wermund
1/29/2013 11:17:54 am

I also noticed in the intro that the authors discussed how they planned to help both ends of the spectrum: those who believe everything and those who have given up on the world an decided that everything is a lie. I think they are really trying to appeal to all types of reader and they truly believe that what they have to say is beneficial to all people of our society today.

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Emma Chester
1/29/2013 04:01:58 am

The purpose of the introduction is to inform the readers what they can expect in the book. Jackson and Jamieson begin by explaining what a spin is, so that it can be easily referenced or identified throughout, and they provide a few examples as well. The purpose is also to build the trust of the readers. The authors include themselves as part of the audience because they can relate to being deceived by such spins, and that causes the reader to relate to them and want to hear what they have to say. My reaction to the introduction is that it seems like this is going to be a very beneficial read and also that it will be easy to connect with the text. The introduction outs me in the mindset of what to look for and also what to gain from reading this book.

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Alex Forsythe
1/29/2013 04:06:57 am

The introduction to "Unspun" is trying to argue that anyone can catch a "spin" in society. The introduction mostly focused on politics, but there is much more spins to be found practically everywhere. They say that after reading this book we should be able to identify these spins and get a better understanding on how things work in all aspects of our lives. Personally, I thought the introduction wasn't very interesting at all. If this whole book is going to be about politics then I don't believe it will be that life changing, considering politics isn't something that enjoy learning about. If the book consists of more everyday life situations then I'm sure it will, in fact, be life changing.

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Evan Scieszka
1/29/2013 04:50:16 am

The introduction of “Unspun” serves to pull the reader in though the first couple paragraphs by telling them how much lying and deceit actually takes place in the modern world. The reader is intrigued by the claims that Carl Rove and the Democratic Party blatantly lied as well as many other advertisers for products. Near the end, the introduction promises the reader to be able to spot lies and have the practical use of saving money which sounds very interesting to the average person. The fact that there are lies everywhere is nothing that I already knew, but some of the claims made were interesting. I am intrigued to see how exactly the book will explain to find good facts and interpret spin. Easy first read and I am anxious to see how the book is once I get further into it.

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1/29/2013 05:24:44 am

The introduction to Unspun was quite interesting in my opinion. The authors were able to strongly express their goal of helping people become “unspun” because in today’s society it is so easy to become “spun.” They begin the intro giving the reader a detailed definition to spinning and continue on with examples of political campaigns and how easily the public can fall into the deception the campaign hopes they receive. Jackson and Jamieson give a huge insight into what the rest of the book will contain but also show that they truly hope to educate people so there is no longer the worry about deception. So far, I found Unspun to be appealing. I have always wondered what information you can trust and what information you should avoid. So I am glad I get to read this to help me receive more insight and learn how to decipher the real from the fake.

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Kelsey Berndt
1/29/2013 05:42:26 am

The introduction to "Unspun" presents the argument that anybody can catch "spin", whether it's faulty advertisement or a deceitful politician. The authors want the reader to become critical of the facts society presents them, to not believe everything they are told. It also argues that becoming "unspun" will save you money, self-respect, even your life. I'm a bit skeptical on it saving your life. The introduction really wasn't too awful. I never read the introductions to book, so I have nothing to base it off of, but I think it gave good insight to what the book will be like.

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Samir Shah
1/29/2013 08:10:35 am

I agree with Kelsey. I too wonder if this book could really change my life, and i thought the into was great. I like how you showed the intro in your writing with a few small sentences. Nice job bro.

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Zoey Holmstrom
1/29/2013 09:59:18 am

I concur with both of you. I'm really glad the intro was very clear and I have a good idea of what's ahead in the reading. Also, I don't know if it will change our lives. I guess we'll find out in the rest of the reading.

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Alex Miller
1/29/2013 06:15:06 am

The purpose the introduction of "Unspun" is to show a little tidbit of what the reader will be able to identify after reading this book. Logos in the intro allow the reader to trust Jackson and Jamieson's credibility and allow the reader some instances that spinning take place in everyday life. My reaction to this bool is skeptically, it mentions a lot of political information and it may be mostly about politics which do not interest me. I am interested in the product analysis of the spinning so hopefully it is more about products than politics.

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Caitlin Morgan
1/29/2013 06:18:08 am

I disagree with those who state that the introduction was boring. Conversely, I found it to be rather intelligent in nature, and successful in purpose. Alone, it was meant to persuade the audience to continue reading. And by foreshadowing the supposed appealing aspects of the forthcoming chapters, and analyzing a couple of primary examples, they have done so seamlessly, and built up ethos along the way. But deeper, it also attempts to convince us that the book itself will benefit us in spotting “spinners,” and avoiding becoming one, as well. Jackson and Jamieson make us feel as though we’ve been victimized by society, and as though their book is a service to us against common lies. In a quite ironic way, they could very well be “spinning” us with their own words, but I suppose we’ll just have to continue reading to discover if all of the hype they've dished out is supported.

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David Tarnowski
1/29/2013 06:50:39 am

I am in complete agreement with Caitlin. She put it very eloquently. I thought that the intro was incredibly interesting. It foreshadowed what was to be shared later in the book and that was the way that they wanted to hook readers into their text. The examples the gave were wonderful because I was able to kind of see how the rest of the book would be set up. What I saw, I liked. I think that Caitlin was right in saying that the purpose of this intro was to make the reader feel like they were being decieved by everyone and that this book is their one salvation. It does a good job of addressing all the different kinds of readers. From skeptics to the lay person, the intro addressed something for everyone. This way, someone won't read the book and think that it doesn't pertain to them so they'll stop reading it. Finally, I think that Caitlin made a very good observation as to how it almost seemed like the intro was attempting to spin us with its own views. Overall, I'm excited to see how the rest of the book is, and once again, outstanding job Caitlin!

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Jeff Lueders
1/29/2013 06:56:25 am

Right from the get-go, Jackson and Jamieson make the argument that people are not honest. They use the term "spin" as a way of pointing out fallacies, and explain how our society is full of spinners and we must work to unSpin ourselves. The authors also argue that their book will help us in this process, and teach us to find spins, even give us ways of finding reliable information. In gist, they give forth the problem of society, news, and other sources being unreliable, and in return offer a solution to this, being their book. Overall, I found the intro to be very straightforward and explanatory, though not boring. It was intriguing by giving teasers of examples, such as how if one is extremely partisan, then this book may change their views, and also the comment about a snake lotion salesman. It sounds like this book will be interesting to read, and question many of our current beliefs, making us re-think things and get a better sense of ourselves.

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Kaytlynn Toering
1/29/2013 07:00:59 am

The Introduction of Unspun was quite interesting. I enjoyed the examples given in the first few pages, advising readers that you may be 'spun' without even realizing it. Mainly, it serves the purpose of inviting readers in. It gives a clear picture of what is to come, and shares how they will teach viewers to stray away from deception. The authors use logos to reach out to the readers and use ethos to connect to the readers on a more personal level. This way, they build trust and readers enjoy what they read. I also believe that the introduction is the hook that will catch attention and ensure that deception is stopped. If the introduction is anything like the rest of the chapter, I am very excited to discover how to become 'Unspun'.

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Evan Pille
1/29/2013 07:32:30 am

What the writers of "Un-spun" tried to accomplish through this into was establish an ethos. Most people who would be looking at this book in the bookstore would first try to find out if this book really does help shed light on looking at things with logic or if it is in fact just as deceptive as the advertisements it ridicules. To prove that it really is credible, it starts right off by giving examples of common deception seen in the world. By doing that the writes have then used logic to show that their book is in fact, logical.

I've never been one to trust either commercial adds or political ones, but that doesn't mean that the book didn't open my eyes at all. While I knew that political opponents are willing to twist facts in order to gain the upper hand, I was unaware that in could be as sneaky as what was shown in the book. I hope (and believe) that the rest of this book will be just as enlightening as this introduction.

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Ravi Shah
1/29/2013 07:42:35 am

The introduction to Unspun was informative and intriguing. It does a good job of making the reader want to continue to read the book, while introducing many of the ideas that will be presented, and telling the readers what to expect. The authors use ethical appeal well and make the readers trust them with their honesty about what is in the book, and what effects it may have on the reader. The logical appeals are present in the quotations of politicians during various campaigns and elections, and the authors present facts that help prove their point about how the media spins things to their benefit. As far as emotional appeals, this section of the book was virtually void of them, relying more on the beliefs of the authors rather than for them to spin the words themselves to get the readers attention. I thought that this book looks very informative on how to detect and understand the spinnings and falsehoods in the world around us, while also helping readers better understand themselves. This book looks like a very interesting read, and I am excited to learn what the authors have to teach their readers.

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Samir Shah
1/29/2013 08:08:10 am

The first few pages where very eye opening. The author comes out and says his points fast and nasty. He first talks about the term “spin”, and what spinners do, and then explains a few fallacies that spinners use. He goes on to describe many public figures, that Americans look up to, who use these fallacies to push themselves ahead. His style is short and to the point. The comes out and says everything that he needs to without wasting a breathe and by doing this he shows that he doesn’t have any particular sides. This also helps because towards the end of the reading he tells readers how, after reading this book, we will look back on all our own arguments and see how they have their own fallacies. I am very impressed with what I’ve read so far. Knowing that all of my work may have spins in them is intriguing. Also, I’m shocked how many famous people and companies use spins to get the attention they have. This is questioning who I voted for…

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Lauren Clem
1/29/2013 09:28:08 pm

I agree with what you said about the famous people and companies and how you related it to "spinning". It is something that I haven't really noticed before.

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Kasey Shoemaker
1/29/2013 08:08:58 am

The introduction to “Unspun” is telling readers that they are going to learn how to recognize the art of spin during this book. Jackson and Jamieson explain that spin is a polite way to say deception. Examples are given to help readers thoroughly understand what spin is. The argument through the introduction is that facts should be the basis of what people believe not what others, such as the media tells them. I found this to be an interesting concept. It is true, and I’m looking forward to reading more into this book and learning more.

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Marcus Shannon
1/29/2013 08:18:19 am

The introduction to “Unspun” did what it should and gave the foundation to the contents of the book. Jackson and Jamieson gave a definition of what a spin is, which is saying that people are notorious for creating deceptive claims. Stating that their book is going to open the minds of readers to these falsehoods, and provide ways of noticing it. For this to work, it is warned, the reader must not be biased because this book will deal mainly with politics. This was a great introduction to show that the book requires an open mind to get the most out of it. I assume that it’s dealing with politics but I’m not sure if that’s entirely true, but I think I will enjoy reading this nonetheless. The introduction itself seems to show what Jackson and Jamieson are aiming for and if they accomplish that in the text it will be a great read.

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Taylor Dale
1/29/2013 09:09:12 am

I guess I missed the part about politics. I went through it again and now I see it and it makes lots of sence. Same with the open mind. It will be challenging but I am excited for the challenge.

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CollililililiHalalal
1/29/2013 10:56:45 am

I agree with you on all points. The intro pretty much just summed up what the book was about, and what you needed to know going in to it. It let me know that the book was going to change how I looked at ads and politics and arguments in general. Jackson and Jamieson have already left a good impression on my by saying most people aren't truthful, which is just the kind of pessimistic attitude I look for when I'm reading other peoples' work. It helps me connect with them. Now that they warned me, I am prepared to dive head first into this world of exposing lies and showing people to be the terrible people they are. The authors tell how 'spinners' use fallacies and such to make themselves seem better than they are. This book exposes them. I think I'll like this book.

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Dylan Gustafson
1/29/2013 08:49:13 am

The introduction of "unSpun" is a very informative and interesting argument. It is telling the reader the wrongdoings of the not only the United States marketing, but the world's, also. By wrongdoings, I mean the false advertising and deception in speeches that "spin" people into believing what they see. The authors do an excellent job at informing the reader about this false information through many examples and plenty of evidence to back it up, including statistics. As for the style and syntax, it is also written well. The text bounces back from long sentences to short sentences, and some mixed up together, making it less boring. In addition, just the first sentence, "We live in a world of spin," grabs the reader's attention and wants them to read more because some people do not know what "spin" is. The author then goes into a magnificent explanation of "spin."

To be honest, not much of what I read was completely shocking. I have always known that most commercials that advertise products are almost entirely false, and that I should not believe them. News stations are out to get us by feeding us false information just to make the story more interesting. I knew that, too. However, the small portion of the introduction that did surprise me was just how fast the authors came out and said everything about deception. There was no lengthy, boring, introduction paragraph. Just fast and straight to the point. This makes me excited to read the book, not only because it will be right to the point, but that it will most likely teach me stuff I did not know about the world.

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Jeremy M. Barker, The
1/29/2013 11:42:53 am

I also thought that the intro is very well written. It starts off with devices that compare several examples to "spin", and also the sentences are not very repetitive of each other. Also, I know exactly what you mean when you say you weren't shocked. Most the of things the book says many people probably already knew, but the fact that they wrote a book using their own word to define it is interesting. Chances are there will be new information within the book, despite already knowing most advertisements are false.

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Marcus
1/29/2013 09:28:32 pm

Cool story bro

Taylor Dale
1/29/2013 09:01:38 am

The introduction to Un Spun is very eye opening. It main purpose is to define what a spinner is, so it is understood throughout the text. Just like other introductions it leads into what the book is about, giving brief over views about what is going to be read. The authors also argue what the reader should get out of reading their book. Personally I thought the introduction was interesting and I am curious to what find out what else the authors have to say. Already with the few examples in the introduction I am starting to understand spinners and can find deceptions in advertisements.

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Austin Latack
1/29/2013 01:43:37 pm

I agree. I can see myself noticing things in their examples and applying them to different situations I have heard and believed too. I cannot wait to continue on and discover what else they are "spinning" on me.

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1/29/2013 09:09:58 am

In the first chapter of this book the authors show the reader just how "spun" their world is. They dont pull any punches in calling out false advertising, lies, and tall tales. The introduction also gets the reader thinking about their lives and how much of it is actually spun. I feel like this is a very good into as it leads me to examine my own spun life. It is dry though and it kinda had me dragging on threw it so if the authors would spice up said chapter that would be great as well.

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Leland Dunwoodie
1/29/2013 11:31:22 am

I like how you say that the authors "don't pull any punches" when proving the prevalent existence of spin in society. I, too, felt like the authors were candid in their argument. I also agree that the passage is "dry" as you pointed out. Read through your post next time so you can catch some grammatical and spelling errors, Sir William.

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Gunner Harrison
1/29/2013 09:12:32 am

The purpose of the introduction to the book is just to make sure the reader is aware of what it will be about, and even aware that what they are talking about exists. I like that it started out by giving examples so that the reader is able to connect to what they are saying. It gave me the impression that the author knows what she is talking about, and that the rest of the book will have a lot of great information.

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Kaity Wade
1/29/2013 09:34:49 am

In this introduction, Jackson and Jamieson made it clear that this world is full of dishonest people by stressing the importance of recognizing when one is being "spun." As a few others have said on this blog, these authors set this book up in a way that every person reading it would be targeted. Through the examples that they used, every person reading can relate, therefore making the book impossible to put down. Jackson and Jamieson's main objective in writing this introduction was to captivate readers. They gave us a tease of the examples they were going to use, and the problems they were going to address. In my opinion, it was somewhere in the middle of boring and interesting, but I am eager to read it because after reading the intro I almost have to know what they are going to say next. Also, they appeal to the reader by telling them that this book is their glimmer of hope. I was under the impression while I was reading that there is no way to avoid being "spun," so in reading this, I will somehow be able to get myself out of this hopeless pit of deception.

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Mason Freehling
1/29/2013 09:45:50 am

The purpose of the introduction to Unspun is fairly obvious. The reading states that the authors assume that the readers will be able to identify spins in their daily lives. The presentation of logos allow for the authors’ credibility to be trusted while still reading a boring introduction. So far, I’m falling asleep while reading about these politics. Hopefully it will change topics so I can at least be somewhat intrigued by this book.

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Jordon Young
1/29/2013 09:51:48 am

The introduction of Unspun, by Jackson and Jamieson, serves to outline the various tools, skills, and possibilities that could come from reading this book, to identify various forms and places of(and define) "spin", as well as giving examples of how the reader will learn through example. The purpose is––rhetorically––to put the reader at ease, to let their guard down, and to open their mind while the authors work their magic, if they have any.
When I picked up this book, I picked it up in a way that I would not normally approach a book. I questioned everything about it: Could it be trusted? Will it actually help me? Is it worth my time? I scrutinized every word thinking that somewhere, somewhere there would be a blatantly obvious logical fallacy that I would be able to pick out and laugh with/at––depending on if logical fallacies have feelings. As a whole, I fell short of my goal, but I felt uneasy when reading parts of it, and I was thinking, "Hmmm, I suppose now they are going to tell me that I should trust what they are saying." Then they did, and I was suddenly okay with it. Phrases like "trust me" usually work on me. I know that when I'm reading, I generally treat everything as true, and store it in my memory as fact(probably a habit from reading too many text books). I'm probably gullible, probably too trusting, probably too open minded, but I like to pretend that I'm in a world where everyone can be friends, just a little while longer.

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Katelyn Tillstrom
1/29/2013 10:53:12 am

They did do a good job with the whole trust part. I feel like I can get a good idea of what it is, and I can know that what I'm reading is most likely true.

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Jared Wendland
1/29/2013 09:59:53 am

I felt the introduction served the purpose of most introductions, which is to draw the reader in. In these first pages the authors emit a serious tone while presenting the idea that many things in our daily lives may be a lie. They bring up certain examples some dealing with elections others they suggest products lie to the public. Altogether the intro constructs this idea of a large scale latter of lies that most are unaware of and that it promises to inform the reader of. I can’t wait to get more into this.

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Zoey Holmstrom
1/29/2013 10:01:43 am

As I read through the introduction to “Unspun”, I was really happy to see that the authors were very straightforward and clear with what their purposes were. The most obvious purpose was that we as Americans are deceived daily by ordinary things. The authors are arguing that by reading this book, their audience will have a better understanding on when they are involved in “spin”, and to avoid it as much as possible. They are also trying to seem trustworthy to their readers by providing examples and facts along with their claims. My reaction to the text was pretty positive. I could clearly detect the authors’ voice. They kept the reading interesting, and unlike other English books, I wasn’t completely bored after I read it. I think this book will give me and the rest of the class new insights to how we are deceived by politicians, media, and more each and every day.

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Katelyn Tillstrom
1/29/2013 10:51:00 am

The introduction is sometimes overlooked, but in this case it is rather important. Not only does it give detailed examples of what we will be reading about, but also argues why spinning, or deception is so bad for us. It says that spinning can be “subtle omissions to outright lies.” It can also be simply making things up. It uses the examples of Republican Karl Rove’s speech; everything he said was entirely true, except he did not include the fact that poverty had gotten worse. Basically, politicians, the internet, commercials, and almost anyone trying to get us on their side, will not include anything that may hurt them as a company or person. The text explains why we need to recognize “spinning,” especially with those examples. It will help not only ourselves, but those around us because we’ll be more likely to realize our own ignorance when it comes to the truth. I’m looking forward to reading the book. This introduction gave me a good idea as to how I’ll benefit from it. The examples given were relatable and easy to understand. It also looks like a really great guide for an important tool.

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Michael Gorton
1/29/2013 11:01:29 am

Personally, I feel that although the introduction was able to capture my attention quickly, it was very lengthly. Not only did Jackson and Jamieson repeat themselves when stating what their ultimate goal was by writing this book, but they also used examples that were common knowledge to me. I appreciate how they hit the ground running with some of the most obvious forms of "spins" in a way that was easy for the reader to comprehend, but I believe the examples could have been a bit shorter and more appealing to the reader. Despite this, I am excited to read more. I have no doubt that this book will be a joyful read that achieves the desired response from the reader that the authors hoped for.

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Colby Clark
1/29/2013 09:23:36 pm

I also liked how they started things off right away with the examples. It made the book more applicable because I could relate to the examples.

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Leland Dunwoodie
1/29/2013 11:27:12 am

The introduction to Unspun, by Brooks Jackson and Kathleen Hall Jamieson, argues that all of society is influenced by deception, or spin, whether they know it or not. This section's purposes are to define spin, prove the prevalence of spin in everyday life, and further the idea that readers will be more apt to recognize and combat spin. The section builds these purposes by using ethos; the passage provides several factual examples of spin. The authors accomplish these purposes to give the reader an overview of the purpose of entire book. This introduction is interesting because it proves the shocking extent to which spin is a part of everyday life as a consumer. The tone of the passage is boring, but a degree of boredom is expected in a strictly informative section.

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Kathleen Risk
1/29/2013 11:27:23 am

Using examples and known facts, the authors of un Spun introduce the reader into our world of deception, and do a fine job in their introduction. Warning us of the many lies there are in the world today, the authors promise they can teach us to see through these things. They establish their credibility by incorporating many examples and using many facts to prove them. Also, they consider their audience when warn “strong partisans” and “cynics,” and acknowledge context. My reaction to this piece is one of curiosity, but also a bit of skepticism. Being a very gullible person, I will gladly read a book that will help me to distinguish truth from “spinning,” but I feel like they will need to establish their credibility a little more. They warn us of rampant lies, so how do we know they aren’t lying themselves? Again, I believe they only need a little more ethos to settle that matter.

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Colby Clark
1/29/2013 09:38:23 pm

Spinning the truth about spinning? Woah there. Maybe it's actually a satirical piece. I liked the part where the acknowledged partisans and cynics, it was good of them to address all types of people.

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Jeremy M. Barker, The
1/29/2013 11:34:21 am

I think the introduction is interesting. The first thing that I noticed was that the book is basically defining the word "spin" in its own way. Reminding me of the definition paper, I began searching for the rhetorical strategies for defining the word "spin." The word is being defined as a form of deception through part truths, or just plain lies. The book uses analogies to explain this deception, such as the spin on a curveball. Similes are also used, such as "Spin misleads people about matters as trivial as a jar of beauty cream or as deadly serious as cancer." From all of that, the major rhetorical strategies are definitely comparisons. I personally think the idea is neat. I enjoy how they go about recognizing the deceptive tactics in politics and advertising. As much as any intelligent person knows about the lies of advertising, this book ensures that it still has information that can be learned. After finishing the intro I felt a want to continue because I strongly believe in the idea of always buying quality.

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Evan Kiel
1/29/2013 08:30:09 pm

The it is very much like a definition that will very likely continue throughout the whole piece. I fell like we all want to buy quality items

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1/29/2013 11:38:51 am

The purposes of the introduction are to define and to argue a proposal on how to prevent being spun, or mislead, by media, politicians,and advertisement. The audience targets is consumers and voters. There are various example of appeal to Ethos. One display of Ethos is the authors mention that they have included research in the book relating to the psychological and communication evidence as to why people are vulnerable or easily swayed by misinformation or fallacy. This evidence provides credibility, as does including the instances of both Democrats and Republicans. By providing both sides of the picture it shows the authors are trustworthy and unbiased. In addition, they discuss the broad issue of deception, which they can relate to. Plus they have empathy for people who are victims of spinning, thus they give advice to prevent being convinced by lies, likeFactCheck.org. Appeals to Pathos are made by using emotional, attention grabbing words like: blind, spun, disease, confusion. The information on unemployment from the Bush presidency and other references are identified and are supported or corrected by the authors which appeals to Logos, especially when they compare the facts and lack thereof.
My first reactions to the text were that I was hopeful and intrigued to find out ways to prevent being mislead, although the main solution is double-checking claims with reliable sources. I was also not surprised since everyone has been a victim of buying dissatisfying products and coping with nonsense political jabber.

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Rachel Tuller
1/29/2013 11:46:44 am

So my reaction to this book is that it will (a) be a quick and easy read and (b) be very interesting to see how they pull off an entire book about the lies in society. It's defiantly very interesting about all the politicians and stuff. As I've gotten older, I have realized that the world is made up of more truths than lies. I think that this will be a great book to read. I think the point of this book is mainly going to be about how to know what claims are truth and what claims are fact. Actually, I kinda know that since they came right out and told us multiple times exactly what the book was going to do for us. That was the most annoying thing about the intro: they kept telling us practically every other paragraph what this book was about. But, overall, I still think it will be a good book to read.

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Danielle Keenan
1/29/2013 11:50:48 am


I thought the introduction was dull. It informs the readers of real life example of being “spun” which mostly happens in politics and advertisements. Its purpose is to inform the reader of what is going to happen in the book. The authors discuss that the reader should get something out of their book. Most of the examples in the intro were about politics which I’m not too thrilled to learn about so I’m not sure if I’m going to get anything out of it.

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Kathleen Janeschek
1/29/2013 11:52:58 am

The introduction serves to explain why this book is important to read. It doesn't simply delve into how to avoid bias and disinformation; instead, it explains why this is a problem. Unspun gives several examples of "spin" and attempts to prove that this is a real issue in the world. As an introduction in many cases is an explanation of the rest of the text, this method works well to draw previously skeptical readers in.

I'm looking forward to reading this book as I have been troubled with finding unbiased sources of information and often question the validity of the sources I do use. The current state of people conforming facts to fit their views troubles me as it becomes ever-prevalent in our society. Not only that, but I have a minor interest in propaganda, and I think the book will likely cover some of that.

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Sara Buckle
1/29/2013 12:28:14 pm

I agree! I really look forward to learning about this as it is something that frustrates me regularly.

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Colby Clark
1/29/2013 09:25:52 pm

I am also looking forward to this book for the same reason. Just remember, everything you read on the interwebs is true.

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Sam D Johnson
1/29/2013 12:01:45 pm

I loved the introduction to unSpun. It aggressivly stole my attention, and kept it with it's wonderfuly applicable examples. It had a beautiful subtle spark of humor that was just enough to maintain the urgency in the tone while still keeping the reader entertained. It argued that we are skammed each and every day and are not even aware. Thankfuly, thier argument didnt contain any inexcusable fallacies. They implied that we need a constant level of suspicion for the ads and facts that we are givin every day. I believed that this drew a portion of their credibility from the piece. It began to make me suspicious of the author himself, if he was giving me faulty examples and half-truths. Either way this book will make me feel proud of refusing the smut that Jackson and Jamieson are thrusting at me or feel enlightened. I figure that I am better off either way, and so I can't wait to continue.

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Carley Grau
1/29/2013 08:38:43 pm

I thought all the examples they gave also gave them credibility.

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Sara Buckle
1/29/2013 12:10:33 pm

The purpose of the intro is to explain what "spin" is and help the readers understand it fully with examples of spin in the real world and descriptions of how it works. It is clear that the authors think that spin is not a good thing and that people should make decisions and form opinions based on reliable information, not just someone else's flawed interpretation or exaggeration of it. I am interested in the topic of this book and I look forward to learning more about it! I'm glad that we're reading it.

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Courtney Bennett
1/29/2013 12:26:45 pm

I think the purpose of the introduction is to explain the basic concept of “spin” and initiate the central ideas of the book. The choices made in the writing style help make the intended points more convincing. By explaining factual examples of ”spin” in politics, hard-to-ignore logic acts as a means of strong persuasion. Also, the loose but informative tone of the introduction build a connection to the audience. By writing in a relatable way, readers are more likely to believe what is being conveyed. I felt personally enlightened by what I read and found myself viewing any kind of argument with a whole new perspective. However, because of this I feel stuck in a paradox. By becoming conscious of potential spin, I’m questioning the very material that makes me question arguments in the first place.

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Darcy Copeland
1/29/2013 12:53:30 pm

The intro to the book targets it's audience--it's audience being the typical American--with promises of showing us how to deceifer facts from the "spin" we are constantly surrounded by. It is also helpful from the start by addressing the most common types of deception: omission, ignoring the facts that contradict our statement, or completely making up your own facts. It then goes on to offer up examples of several types of deception that we can recognize easily in our daily lives, such as political parties, advertisements, etc. The intro gives its audience a lot to expect from the book, and really is quite a bold statement entirely (although rightly made, I'm sure). It gives me a lot to look forward when reading this, and I hope that, as Mrs. Ziegler mentioned, it will turn out to be a real eye-opener.

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Owen Carow
1/29/2013 12:55:59 pm

The point of this introduction is both to inform the reader of the premise of the book, identifying "spins," and also to give them a taste of the writing style, in the hopes of catching interest. The argument in this introduction is that we are all surrounded by lies and deceptions, and that this book will help us identify and exempt ourselves from these tricks. It uses both citeable facts and fluent writing to communicate its ideas. As someone with a predisposition against "spinners", I can tell I will be at the very least interested in the material. I can see how this could be an eye-opening book, and I'm excited to see what new perspectives it has to offer.

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Austin Latack
1/29/2013 01:41:47 pm

In the Introduction of "Unspun," the authors argue, mainly using ethos, pathos, and logos, that the world as we know it is more than meets the eye. They give examples and rhetorically state what the book will have in the following chapters, and sound very professional and like a credible source- like they "did their homework" on the topics. They also make the reader want to read more and yearn to see what they are being lied to daily from trusted sources, and also tells that they can detect those ways by reading on. I think it sounds very intriguing in regards to what the book has in the proceeding pages. I made me feel the urge to question what i have been lied to about, and the book seems very interesting so far.

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Jerred Zielke
1/29/2013 08:12:02 pm

In the intro of unSpun, the authors explain what spin is and reveal that the world has been lying to everyone. They give good examples of spin and give a preview of what is to come later in the book. So far the book has me intrigued. It'll be interesting to see what else people have been lying about.

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Richard Harris
1/29/2013 08:14:08 pm

The introduction to unSpun was a short and easy read that shows how spin occurs in our lives daily (political campaigns and advertising). It aims to define spin for the reader and how it deceives the public. Finally, the introduction sets the goal of having the reader identify spin and be able to avoid it.

I thought the introduction was really interesting. I liked the examples of spin that were provided and feel that the content of this book will be useful in later life.

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Justin Marutz
1/29/2013 08:24:30 pm

"Unspun's" introduction is to present what a reader should expect from the rest of the book. This case how not to be spun, from every falsehood one may see. The author argues for you wanting your eyes to be opened with the help of their book. The syntax is very clever at times throwing in alliterations and such. It sounds interesting and I think that that one could learn a lot through reading this book

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Evan Kiel
1/29/2013 08:25:57 pm

The introduction of Unspun shows you what the book is going to be about and how they are going to approach it. It introduces the concept of spin as a method for twisting the facts and making you believe something is good that maybe bad or vise versa. This section also challenges you to look at both sides of an argument with an open mind so that you are able to tell who is right or more importantly who is trying to spin you. It also shows how book maybe set up with the examples and then the explanation of the facts after that. This truly shows you how the "facts" given don't always mean what you think. I feel like this book will be quite interesting looking up facts is something that I enjoy doing, mostly to prove people wrong. Also, because I don't strongly support either side in politics it will be interesting to see how people react to the different tactics and also seeing what tactics are used.

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Carley Grau
1/29/2013 08:37:05 pm

The introduction to 'Unspun' is a bunch of examples teaching how to catch the spin in society, telling right away what the book is about. It shows that every one can catch the false advertisements and the lies in electives, and that not everything out there is true or necessarily protected from lying by the government. My first reaction was surprise. I know that there is a lot of false advertisements out there but I didn't realize the lying in them were so extreme, or that even presidents have knowingly lied to the country.

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Danielle Curley
1/29/2013 09:04:23 pm

The introduction argues that the average American is constantly fooled by advertising and politics and by the end of this book you will be able to point out spins. They gain your trust by pointing out examples of spins and giving other examples. The argument is that they can teach you how to point out spins.

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Lauren Clem
1/29/2013 09:26:57 pm

Without the introduction, Unspun, by Brooks Jackson and Kathleen Jamieson, would have lost a huge concept of the book. The readers really get pulled into the idea that our world today is fast-paced, very busy, as has a sense of “spinning”. While defining exactly what this term means in the sense of how the characters’ lives are lived, the reader gets a clear idea of what the entire book is going to be about. I really enjoyed how the authors wrote the introduction because of the way they introduced small details that will play a huge part in the entire book.

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Colby Clark
1/29/2013 09:33:54 pm

The introduction to "Unspun" provides a basic outlook to the deceit and misinformation that is spread from politicians and businesses. It introduces a purpose of being able to teach the reader how to interpret the facts and not just accept the spin. The authors want to teach the readers how to obtain facts in a world of propaganda and advertising. The authors also challenge the reader to look at both sides of every argument and to keep an open mind. I am interested in reading this book because it will be applicable to real life situations. There seems to be a lot to learn from this book, and hopefully I will be a lot more informed when it's over.

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Jacob DeSutter
2/10/2013 06:33:27 pm

(ABSENT)

The intro in UnSpun servers to give a basis for the rest of the book, and give a general idea where spin finds its roots. It gives brief-yet-effective examples of both political and business ads that try to unbalance the truth of the given situation from buying internet to The Draft (x). The intro also serves to give it a non-bias platform, as it chooses ads from both right and left to attack. UnSpun's intro even dips into the fact that own biology seems to be gunning for us.

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