This blog has two parts. Your response should speak to both: 

1) What is the most significant vignette of the ENTIRE novel and why?

2) I brought this piece back this year after a few years without it. Do you think we should keep reading it in years to come? Is it APLACable? Why or why not?

Thanks for taking on this novel. I hope Cisneros offers you something as writers and as readers.
Emma Chester
10/30/2012 05:49:27 am

Out of the entire novel, the vignette that I find the most significant is Beautiful & Cruel. It begins with commenting on how Minerva left her house and how Nenny has pretty eyes. It is clear that Esperanza doesn't feel pretty. This is the part where Esperanza's mother is talking to her about growing up and how things will fall into place. It stands out to me because Esperanza desires to defy the norm, beginning her "own quiet war" (89). Although a part of her wishes to be pretty like other girls, in this section she realizes that their lives are not hers. She is no longer confined to a predetermined path. I think this vignette is a perfect example of who Esperanza is: a girl who wanted to mature fit in but discovers that she has many more options. She will leave Mango Street and the stereotypes that go with it. She will be strong, even though "Mexicans don't like their women strong" (10). This part of the story captures the essence of the entire piece. I strongly believe that this novel should remain in the APLAC course. It has examples of several rhetorical devices, varied syntax, and exquisite word choice. It also shows how to say a lot in very few words. The overall organization is genius, and it is not only informative and educational, but enjoyable as well. I would consider it VERY APLACable. (:

Reply
10/30/2012 10:18:07 am

Emma, I love your whole response to this blog! I concur with every aspect. I think she's learning a lot through out this book and I think you capture it well.

Reply
Maddie (not maddoe) Williams
10/30/2012 06:03:15 am

Although this may seem a little obvious, for me the most powerful vignette of the whole book was the very last one: "Mango Says Goodbye Sometimes". Not only was it a fantastic and startling closing to the book, but it gave a very thorough overview of what Esperanza discovers and learns about life while she is on Mango street. And, it does so in only a page. I absolutely love the line "I like to tell stories. I am going to tell you a story about a girl who didn't want to belong" (109), because it shows that Esperanza has matures and realized how Mango Street affected her. Then, this vignette goes on to repeat the words the opened the story, bringing everything full circle, but not before Esperanza adds in how she has grown as a result of her time on Mango. As she says "I wrote it down and Mango says goodbye sometimes. She does not hold me with both arms. She sets me free...I am too strong for her to keep me here forever" (110). This realization that Mango will forever be a part of who she is is perhaps the best way to show that she matured. She goes from trying her absolute hardest to escape Mango, but in the end welcomes it as a part of the past that shaped her, no matter how miserable it may have been. I think this book is most definetly APLACable. Everything about it is incredible. The way Cisneros communicates deep and tender feelings with short and sweet sentences, the way Esperanza's childish innocence shines through in each vignette. Cisneros has taught me so much about the phrase "less is more", And I really loved that about this book. It also was great in terms of creating the perfect tone for each situation, and varying in syntax to match that tone. I hope future APLAC kids get to read this because it was amazing.

Reply
10/30/2012 06:27:15 am

I really liked Mango Says Goodbye Sometimes as well, she was able to finish her novel in a just about a page but bring the whole story full circle and leave us with an awesome story I am sure I will never forget!

Reply
Alex Forsythe
10/30/2012 06:28:35 am

I liked the last piece too. I agree with you on how Mango will always be apart of her. I think it will really shape who she is when she is grown, and she won't take anything for granted. I feel like in order to fully understand something you have to experience it for yourself, and as readers we can only imagine how much this certain situation could mature someone.

Reply
David Tarnowski
10/30/2012 10:28:04 am

I love how eloquently you worded your response. Everything that you said was dead on. I agree with you 100%. I was also able to get the fact that although she despised her house on Mango Street at the time, looking back at it, it was something that shaped her from the last vignette.

Reply
Jeff Lueders
10/31/2012 06:33:22 am

I find that Mango Says Goodbye Sometimes was a great ending to the book. It gave a sense that Esperanza grew throughout the book, and it showed how mature she was. And again, Cisneros had such elegance that she made her point in one lone page.

Reply
10/30/2012 06:20:42 am

Overall the most significant vignette was A Rice Sandwich, I found this one interesting because at the beginning she just wants to be able to eat in the canteen at school, I thought her reasoning for staying at school were funny like you would see me less and less and like me better. But when she has to go to the nun’s office and point to where she lives then begins to cry I felt so bad for her. This vignette really helped me see the embarrassment Esperanza must have been feeling and how badly she wished her life was different. I really enjoyed The House on Mango Street, it was total different from what I was expecting and had a lot of great examples of different writing styles. It most defiantly APLACable and I am glad we were able to read it this year.

Reply
Alex Forsythe
10/30/2012 06:21:01 am

I think the most significant vignette is "Bums in the Attic" because it really brings a lot out of Esperanza. As she is growing up she realizes that what she has been given in her lifetime isn't all that great. When she was young, everything was okay and she enjoyed being with her friends, ignoring the life around her. One line that realy struck me from this section was, "I am tired of looking at what we can't have" (86). She says that she used to love to go to the gardens when she was young, but now that her lifestyle makes sense to her, she refuses to accompany her father to the gardens. Later in the section she says, "One day I'll own my own house, but I won't forget who I am or where I came from" (87). This line really struck me because she still wants to remember everything she has endured, but grow from it. She doesn't want her new life to change her when she grows up. I really liked that she said the hobo could stay in her attic as well. She knows how it feels to not have a home, and she wants others who are less fortunate just like she was to have equal opportunities like she would now have. I thoroughly enjoyed this piece. At some points I got confused, but I understood as I read on. I feel as if it can teach a quick life lesson to appreciate all we are given because there are people out there who are struggling. I also think it shows us that writing doesn't have to be super complex. Using smaller words and shorter sentence struggle can still get the job done.

Reply
Alex Forsythe
10/30/2012 06:23:06 am

This is most definitely APLACable. :)

Reply
Alex Miller
10/30/2012 09:17:36 am

Haha nice.... I also agree with the book showed us that writing does not have to be so complex all the time. This book is a prime example of this.

10/30/2012 09:39:30 am

I could not agree more. The 'I will not forget who I am or where I came from" deffinatley spoke to me

Reply
Danielle Curley
10/30/2012 11:40:28 am

I agree that Bums in the Attic was the most valuable one, the line from page 86 makes her seem ashamed of where she came from but then the line from page 87 also struck me because she says she wants to renewed where she came from , it how's her maturing I think.

Reply
Kylie Wermund
10/30/2012 10:41:31 pm

I also found this vignette the most significant and also mentioned the line about not forgetting where she's coming from in my blog. It really shows how she is growing up and her view on her life is changing as she is exposed to more things in the world outside of Mango Street.

Reply
Leland Dunwoodie
10/30/2012 06:38:56 am

"The Three Sisters" (103) is the most significant vignette of the entire novel. This vignette changes Esperanza's life. Before this vignette her purpose in life was escaping the iron clutches of Mango Street; this vignette makes her see that Mango Street will always be a part of her and that she needs to come back and help those that don't possess her gifts. While I think that this book is pointless and frustrating to read because of the lack of organized punctuation such as quotation marks (grrr), this book should continue to be a part of APLAC becauses it showcases a different kind of writing style. Seeing different styles helps students grow as writers. This book is APLACable, but (for me) not enjoyable.

Reply
Evan Scieszka
10/30/2012 08:06:19 am

I also felt that "The Three Sisters" really emphasized a change in Esperanza's life and shows her that Mango Street will always be with her. I also like how you openly expressed your feelings about the book.

Reply
Dylan Gustafson
10/30/2012 09:56:30 am

I thought the book was pretty godd, but the whole story without quotation marks really bugged me. I had to stop and remember who was talking.

Reply
Jordon Young
10/30/2012 12:14:41 pm

Last sentence: My feelings in a nutshell.

Reply
Evan Scieszka
10/30/2012 07:57:49 am

I think that the most significant vignette through out the novel was “The Three Sisters” because prior to this all that Esperanza dreamed about was leaving Mango Street and having a house of her own. In this specific vignette Esperanza finally realizes how fortunate she is just to have the chance to leave Mango Street and that she owes it to everyone to come back. She realizes that although she may have a beautiful house one day she has to remember Mango Street so that she never forgets the past. Although it was not my favorite book that we have read so far in APLAC, I still feel that it should be taught in future years. The main reason for this is that Cisneros is an expert at her specific writing style and language. Her use of rhetorical devices also tied into what we were learning and really gave me a better understanding as to how to use them. Since this book really helps writers grow and develop, it is definitely APLACable.

Reply
Ravi Shah
10/30/2012 09:26:06 am

I think that "The Three Sisters" was a turning point for Esperanza in the story, and that it is a good reminder for everyone to remember their past even if they didn't like it at the time. It is also an excellent piece in the book, partly due to the philosophical ideas, and because of the writing.

Reply
The Jeremy M. Barker
10/30/2012 01:06:34 pm

I agree with the importance of "The Three Sisters." I like how you say that she'll never forget her past, because I thought she did come to the conclusion of accepting her childhood on Mango Street. I also agree with how the rhetorical strategies are an important tool for it being APLACable despite it not being a favorite, or even liked in my case.

Reply
Kaytlynn Toering
10/30/2012 08:53:18 am

I agree with Maddie. The most powerful vignette to me in this novel is Mango Says Goodbye Sometimes. The story started out as a contrast to this section, as Esperanza is describing about how she longs to be in another place and at another time. But during these last two pages, Esperanza suddenly realizes what an effect Mango Street has had on her. One of the quotes that stands out the most to me is, "...what I remeber most is Mango Street, sad red house, the house I belong but do not belong to" (110). Cisneros adds this vignette to the end of the novel because it is her way of tieing everything back together, and completes that full writer's circle. Esperanza learns that although she did not necessarily belong, she was a part of something she never had been before, and she grew up and matured on Mango Street. Without this part of her life, it could have chnaged who she was and she never would have learned the important life lessons she did. This novel should continue to be included in the syllabus for upcoming years. It was a very meaningful story, urging readers to use different strategies to improve their writing. Also, Cisneros unqiue style, word choice, different rhetorical devices, and syantx, creating new ways of writing. It teaches people universal lessons as well, about youth and innocence, and it truly is a beautiful piece of literatue. Super APLACable!!

Reply
Evan Pille
10/30/2012 09:10:25 am

The single most valuable vignette of this story would have to be "The Three Sisters". In a book of mostly childish rhymes and despair, this is the first time we get a sense of hope. These aunts come for a funeral and end up being the nicest characters the book gives. They give Esperanza confidence in her name, in herself, and in her dreams. Not only that, they give her a mission, to come back and help those she struggled along side. These are the two key points Mrs. Cisneros is trying to convey: that there is always hope, and we should always work to help those who are unable to help themselves.

As for if it's APLACable, that's a much more difficult question. On one hand the prose is some of the most interesting that we've studied in school. It does a great job of bringing us the perspective of this child in a bad neighborhood. But thinking realistically, when are we ever going to be able to use this style of writing. It's only good when writing from the perspective of a child. If we were to use this style in an informative essay, an argument, or really anything other then the perspective of a kid it's going to come off as immature, and childish.It really depends on if you want to give us a range of experience with styles then yes, it's APLACable. But when the focus is on any other type of literature then the book will be close to useless.

Reply
Leland Dunwoodie
10/30/2012 11:47:24 am

I agree with your choice of vignette. This is a turning point for Esperanza. I also like how you expressed your opinions of the book itself and as a piece of lierature as a whole.

Reply
Alex Miller
10/30/2012 09:16:06 am

The most powerful vignette was Monkey Garden (94). Cisneros uses a lot of imagery that made me feel like I was there, " Weeds like so many squinty-eyed stars and brush that made your ankles itch..." (95). I also started smelling, "...sleepy smell of rotting wood, damp earth and dusty hollyhocks thick and perfumy like the blue-blond hair of the dead" (95) and it was so powerful. There is also a transition of a little girl who loved to play to a girl who's feet, " ...seemed far away" (98) from just closing her eyes. She never returned and in a sense grew up. I absolutely enjoyed this book and I think it would be great to continue reading it. It showed me the show vs. tell method you always talk about and allowed be to experience amazing writing skills from Cisneros.

Reply
10/30/2012 10:32:57 am

I said Monkey Garden was a big vignette in the book too. Esperanza simply does not return to that childish state and she moves on to be more mature after her experience at the Monkey Garden that day. She realizes that she wants to go somewhere else in life, to grow up, to grow out of the Monkey Garden, out of Mango Street, into her own person, and leave the past behind.

Reply
Zoey Holmstrom
10/30/2012 12:14:50 pm

I definitely started to smell the garden too as I was reading this section. I also really like the point you made that it showed you the show vs. tell method. I really learned a lot from this too, and I know it can help improve my writing a lot by having this book as a wonderful example.

Reply
Jared Wendland
10/30/2012 12:26:44 pm

I agree that that specific section did use a lot of imagery maybe not always for the best though. At points it was profound at other it was odd.

Reply
Lauren Clem
10/30/2012 10:36:10 pm

This was my second favorite vignette in the novel becuase of the great imagery! I really enjoyed reading it.

Reply
Ravi Shah
10/30/2012 09:22:56 am

I thought that three of the vignettes were equally powerful, when combined. These three were "Sally," "What Sally Said," and "Linoleum Roses". They stood out mostly because they are seemingly a separate story from the rest of the book. It tells the story of one of Esperanza's friends, her best friend, and how her life was very different than Esperanza's. It tells the story of what the lives of most teenage girls is in places like those, how they are bullied at school to the point where they just stay at home, how they can be abused by their parents or by other children and can't seem to get away no matter what, and how they are willing to do anything to get out of that life, even getting married before high school, and losing all of their friends. These together stood out to me more than any other section of the book. I think this book was very well written, and the writing is style is good for high school students to read so they can do something similar in their writing. I think that it should be read in the future, but with more time to discuss the literary elements in class, not when bunched together with exams.

Reply
Kelsey Berndt
10/30/2012 09:30:53 am

There are many, many important vignettes in "The House on Mango Street," however, "The Three Sisters" sticks out to me as the most significant vignette. In "The Three Sisters," Esperanza is told that she can't forget the people on Mango Street. The sisters tell her, "You will always be Esperanza. You will always be Mango Street. You can't erase what you know. You can't forget who you are" (105). Before Esperanza meets the sisters, all she wants is to leave Mango Street and never return. She wants to live in a house all her own, but the sisters make Esperanza realizes she's a lucky one, that she has what it takes to leave Mango Street, but Esperanza can't forget what it's like. I found this book really enjoyable, it's unlike any book I've ever read. I think you should definitely keep this in the curriculum. Cisneros proves that you can write something beautiful without dragging it on. I think that it would be a good idea to read it before writing the narratives though.

Reply
Taylor
10/30/2012 10:04:25 am

The Three Sisters has so much truth. In the future we can go anywhere. Some us will be sugeons, lawyers, or become a famous actor, singger or dancer, but we can never forget where we can from. It is what makes us, us. Home is where we learn right from wrong, it is where we have our good and bad times. Home is everything. That is basically what The Three Sisters tells us.

Reply
Maddie Williams
10/30/2012 10:18:05 am

I agree taylor. I loved how it shows without staying it stright-up how much where you come from is a large part of you. Even though Esperanza didn't want mango to be a part of her, she had to embrace the fact that is was.

10/30/2012 09:35:24 am

I think Beautiful and Cruel is the best Vignette of the novel.Esperanza wages an internal war to seize what should have been hers all along. The right to be equal. The vignette is very short, but what else is there to be said? When she wasn't gifted with beauty like her sister, the only way for her to have power is to take it. Her mother wants her to play by the rules and she has no intention to. Its daring and I like it. I feel like this book is APLACABLE because it is so simple with description so immense that every writer could glean something from it. Simple words carry huge meaning in this book.

Reply
SaMir ShAh
10/30/2012 10:02:22 am

Yeah, i agree with what you said about Beautiful and cruel. I agree with what you said about it because of the internal war.

Reply
Dylan Gustafson
10/30/2012 09:52:10 am

I thought the most significant vignette was "Mango Says Goodbye Sometimes." In here, Esperanza finally comes to the realization that Mango Street is her home and that she needs to visit the ones she left. But most importantly of all, when she felt sad and lonely at times, it would all go away when she was writing. "I put it down on paper and then the ghost does not ache so much. I write it down and Mango says goodbye sometimes" (110). She is saying here that when she writes, the sad place of Mango Street goes away and she becomes. I also think this vignette can be a very good tip for people. Writing can lift up your spirits and make you happy when you lay everything out on paper. We should keep reading it because the story allows the reader to realize how an idea that is so simple can be turned into something bigger through the use of imagery and rhetorical stratigies. It also helps the reader become a better writer when they are exposed to these stratigies.

Reply
Sara Buckle
10/30/2012 01:05:58 pm

Esperanza really grows as a character and realizes that she cannot change who she is or where she comes from, and learns to appreciate it. I think that shows a lot in this last vignette.

Reply
taylor
10/30/2012 09:58:13 am

There are so many vignette to choose from, all of them significant in their own way. The one that was significant to me is The Three Sisters. It ties the whole book together. If the book followed a complete story line this would be the climax. It has a great lesson, which basically explains the lesson throughout the whole book. This expressed when Cisneros writes, “When you leave you must remember to come back, she said” (105). This vignette talks about three sisters that grant Esperanza a wish. As you can imagine Esperanza wished to get away from Mango Street. The rest of the book talks about how Esperanza leaves and gets her own home, a house as she has always imagined. But back to the Three Sisters, it reminds her to never forget Mango Street and that she never forgets. The Three Sisters also contains several rhetorical devices and specific syntax structure. When Esperanza is talking to the sister they talk in short, choppy sentences. For Example, “Tomorrow it will rain. Yes, tomorrow, they said” (104). There are also no quotations Esperanza narrates the scene. Cisneros uses several similes to describe the sisters and the surroundings. For example, “They smelled like Kleenex or the inside of a satin hand bag, and then I didn’t feel afraid” (104). That is also an example of how Sandra Cisneros used her senses especially smell to describe the scene.
The House on Mango Street is probably the best book I have read this year. It should defiantly be read every year. It uses all the rhetorical devices, unlike the other things we have read. They consisted of usually the same handful of devices. It also puts things into a different perspective. Cisneros uses all the persons (first, second, third) and does it well. She provides great examples and makes writing a bit easier to understand.

Reply
Katelyn Tillstrom
10/30/2012 10:52:08 am

I agree! This one definitley ties a lot of the story together. I love what you said about this being the climax! It shows Esperanza's struggle to do what she wants to do.

Reply
SaMir ShAh
10/30/2012 10:00:17 am

Although there are many good passages in the book, the vignette that was most significant to the story was, “ Mango says Goodbye Sometimes.” I know that many people will wonder why I’m choosing the last vignette to write about, but it shows how much Esperenza had grown since she first moved to the house. In this section, she looks back, and sees that she actually misses the red house, even though during the book she really didn’t like it. Along with feelings, it shows how she has grown in age. She uses more complex words and sentence structure. This shows how much she has grown in this house, especially because before, she was always moving. I think that you should keep this book for next years APLACers. Although it is a short read, it shows a fair amount of rhetorical devices, imagery, and syntax changes. It is APLACable.

Reply
DaViD TaRNoWsKi
10/30/2012 10:23:07 am

I agree with you. I really like how you metioned the fact that she started using bigger words and more complex sentence structure, but you're right.

Reply
David Tarnowski
10/30/2012 10:20:29 am

I have to agree with Maddie and Kaytlynn. I found the last vignette the most powerful one. It's appropriate that this be the last one. This vignette brings closure to the book, but it also is very thought provoking. One can see that Esperanza has matured much more as she got older. She realizes that Mango Street was temporary, yet it would be with her for the rest of her life. One thing that I especially like about this vignette was the fact that Cisneros used a full circle ending when she mentions the different places Esperanza lived. This vignette also reveals something profound about writing. "I pur it down on paper and then the ghost does not ache so much" (110). Writing allows one to relieve their souls of burdens and hard memories. It is a way to freely express one self. We saw this when we wrote our narratives.

I definitely think that this book should be read every year. It is very APLACable and applicable. In terms of APLAC, it is chock full of rhetorical devices. It is also a great example of how one can say a lot in a little. This book is also something that I think everyone should read. It's incredibly revealing and inspiring. Although it is fiction, it tells a story that a person can relate to in some aspect. I would be incredibly sad if this book was removed from your curriculum. It would a lot of people would miss out on a great book. I honestly would never have picked that book up on my own, but I am so glad that I was introduced to it.

Reply
10/30/2012 10:25:01 am

The Monkey Garden is the most significant in the whole novel. Some reasons are that it depicts a point in Esperanza’s life where she feels like she does not belong and is growing out of her old habits like playing in the Monkey Garden with the other kids and transitioning from a young and childish girl into someone who is more realistic, mature, and older. Reader’s can derive significance from the way Esperanza wanted to save Sally from the boys who wanted a kiss in exchange for Sally’s keys, and when Esperanza goes to tell Tito’s, one of the boys, mother about the predicament Sally was in. She realizes Sally can make decisions for herself and that she is a big girl, old enough to know consequences for her actions and can take risks as she pleases. Esperanza, up until then, was quite naive. At the end of this vignette, Esperanza sulks and wishes to just disappear and run away once she discovers the hard truth of growing up. She says, “I wanted to be dead, to turn into the rain...”(97). Esperanza never returns to the Monkey Garden and this can also be seen as she never returned to being that innocent little girl anymore.

Reading The House on Mango Street was amazing and I definitely suggest that it remains to be read in this class. The way Cisneros writes is very eye opening and I so enjoyed the similes she makes. She really takes a step back and describes things from perspectives rarely ventured. The vast possibilities writing holds are shown in her beautiful writing quite successfully. Future kids in APLAC would benefit greatly from this read.

Reply
Kathleen Janeschek
10/30/2012 02:31:02 pm

I agree with what you say about the Monkey Garden. It is a passage of change and transformation for Esperanza. She starts out stuck between the children's world and the world of young women, and in the end she has to choose to leave behind her childhood. Even though she might not be ready, she has to grow up. Even if it means being ripped from what she knows.

Reply
10/30/2012 10:26:48 am

Overall, the most significant vignette in The House on Mango Street was My Name. I liked this specific vignette because I related to it first of all. Most kids go through a stage where they hate their name and find more "suitable" names for it. I really like how she described her name, and why it's good and bad, and why she wants to change it. I especially loved where Cisneros kind of foreshadows in this vignette. Esperanza talks about how her name was her great grandmothers name, and how she was a "wild horse of a woman" (11). Her grandmother was strong, and Esperanza wants to be strong but "the Mexicans don't like their women strong" (10). I really enjoyed reading this novel. I thought it was extremaly interesting and also eye opening a way, due to the writing style and the story itself. I learned a whole different teqnique of writing, and I really enjoyed the whole 5 day I got to enjoy the story line! From the first vignette, to the last, I think future APLACers will want to read this, and SHOULD read this.

Reply
Gunner Harrison
10/30/2012 10:45:04 am

I thought tat "A House of My Own" was the best vignette in the book. At the beginning she talks about how she is disappointed in her house and how it was not the house she dreamed of. After all of the stories she grew up to own the house she wanted and I thought that was a very striking part of the book. It was an interesting book, but I never really got into it. I would suggest reading it in future classes; it is easy to read and has very interesting syntax.

Reply
Colby Clark
10/30/2012 10:48:08 am

I think that the most powerful vignette in the story was "The Three Sisters" (103). This is a major turning point in Esperanza's life because she finally realizes that Mango Street will always be a part of her. Even though she wants nothing more than to escape, she is able to realize that some people can't leave, and that she needs to remember them. I didn't really enjoy this book at all, there was enough of a solid plot for me to enjoy it. Honestly I thought it was dull. However, I can't deny that the rhetorical devices and writing style are very APLACable. I don't think it is a great story, but it is worth reading to see an example of excellent language and writing skills.

Reply
Collin Halamka
10/30/2012 11:48:27 am

I like how you worded what you said about "The Three Sisters." it definitely is a turning point in her life, and Mango Street will also be a part of her. Although her feelings towards her siblings weren't always the best, she still needs to remember them.

Reply
Katelyn Tillstrom
10/30/2012 10:49:15 am

All of the vignettes in The House on Mango Street are incredibly important to the story. It’s hard to choose which one in most important overall. But, the one that really stick out is the one titled “Alicia & I Talking on Edna’s Steps.” A good portion of the novel consists of Esperanza wishing she lived somewhere else and had a different life. Here, she is given Alicia’s own words of wisdom. She tells Esperanza that she is Mango Street (107). This is where she is from. She continues to tell her that one day she’ll even go back. These words really speak to the reader, and hopefully Esperanza as well. I wonder if the last section foreshadows anything. Esperanza says she’ll never come back until someone makes it better. However, she laughs at Alicia’s suggestion of the mayor doing it. It ends with “Who’s going to do it? Not the mayor” (108). This makes me wonder if this will be Esperanza’s duty later on. I really enjoyed this book! It’s definitely different than anything I have ever read. But, it opens me up to realizing what other types of writing are out there. It makes me comfortable to break out of my own box of writing, because this is so unusual. At first, I was unsure. But once I understood what was going on and Cisneros’ unique style, it clicked. And, it uses a good amount of the rhetorical devices we discussed as a class. This should definitely be read by future APLAC classes.

Reply
Danielle Curley
10/30/2012 11:27:33 am

The most significant vignette in my opinion is Bums in the Attic, she talks about the wealthier people who live in nice houses way up on a bill and look down on houses like hers on mango street. She almost makes them sound snooty and like they are better then everyone else. When she says that someday she will live up in a house like that she shows how she has grown to be a good person and can respect people who aren't as wealthy by stating she will let homeless people sleep in her attic because she understands what it is like. This section shows her coming of age.This wasn't my favorite book but I do think it is good for students to read because it shows them a different writing style.

Reply
Collin Halamka
10/30/2012 11:44:13 am

The most significant vignette in "The House on Mango Street" was "The Three Sisters." It really makes Esperanza realize that no matter how much she hates it and how little she thinks she needs it, Mango Street is who she is. The sisters tell her that wherever she goes, she always has to come back. then line "A circle, understand?" (105) makes Esperanza know she must come back. The sisters also tell her "you can't forget who you are." She is Mango Street.

As for it being APLACable, it is very much so. It is unlike any other book I've read in high school, and definitely opened my eyes as to what you can do with writing. I never thought a writer could get so much out in so few words and pages. From her similes to analogies to general word choice, it is brilliant. Some of these techniques will carry into my writing. Hopefully this book can do the same for years to come.

Reply
Jordon Young
10/30/2012 12:11:19 pm

I was keeping the blog post topic in my mind while I was reading, and I thought I found the most important vignette multiple times. At first, I thought it was "Bums in the Attic," because Esperanza talks about how she will treat others differently because of the life she has lived(86). I thought that was deep, but I knew––hoped––there would be something better. I tried to narrow it down to two without much luck. The best in terms of message is "The Three Sisters," but the best in terms of writing advice is the very last: "Mango Says Goodbye Sometimes." Basically, Esperanza learns to cope with her past through writing. Yes it's a good message. No, it's not new. I would say it's a good book to read purely because of style. I like to get a message to take with me out of every book, yet I didn't feel like there was anything new in my collection when I closed the book. I did read Sleepers, so I might have had a head start. It is stylistically very APLACable.

Reply
Kasey
10/30/2012 12:13:51 pm

For me the most significant vignette was The monkey Garden. As I was reading the imagery made me feel as though I were actually sitting in the garden, smelling and touching all of the things that Esperanza smelt and touched. She felt as though the garden was her safe haven and when sally and Tito and his friends entered it, she took it personally. We see that she feels lonely and once she admits this she is able to move on and mature. This is why she is able to get up and leave the garden with the thought of her feet not feeling like her own and so neither does the garden (98). I whole heartedly enjoyed this book and I think you should keep it on the list so that kids can read it in years to come.

Reply
Caitlin Morgan
10/30/2012 12:37:56 pm

I love how you related the garden to Esperanza's character as her safety zone. I also developed this sense while reading, "The Monkey Garden," specifically in the kiss-for-keys scene.

Reply
Rachel Tuller
10/30/2012 12:17:32 pm

I think that the most important vignette in this book was "Papa Who Wakes Up Tired in the Dark." To me, it seemed that that was a changing point for Esperanza. It seemed like it was the point when she became more grown up. Up until that moment, it had mostly been childish fun but in that moment, we realized that she really was a young lady. I think this book really is a good read. It shows a lot of rhetorical strategy. By far though, my favorite thing about this book was the photo album like plot and how each chapter appeared to be a new photo on a different day. I think it's very good for students to read something like this because it is so different than what we normally would read. So, it's good for them to experience this different style of writing.

Reply
Jared Wendland
10/30/2012 12:22:40 pm

In this book the most significant section would have to be Bums in the Attic. This part shows a lot about Esperanza's growth. Because she has grown up in this world of poor neighborhoods, around others unfortunate lives, her views on achieving the ideal life has changed. Now she doesn’t want to talk, think, or even hear about “when we win the lottery” what life will be like. This section honestly encapsulates Esperanza's lifeless views on the greater society that she’s always dreamed of being a part of. I found it very profound how she talks about the star and the earth. How the rich get to be closer to the stars and happier while the poor are more earthly and carry more burden. I found the most important part was when she is talking about how the rich don’t even acknowledge the poor. After this she says how when she gets out she won’t forget these people.
As for the bring of this book back I say probably no. It was a nice how it was the best piece for one of your past students, but for me it did not seem to benefit me that much. Maybe it was the ill timing of the whole thing or maybe it was the uncomfortable format but the book kind of went in one ear and out the other. In a one line, the book was a burden to read.

Reply
Owen Carow
10/30/2012 01:55:54 pm

Wow, I didn't feel like the book was a burden at all. It's true that some parts didn't really have a chance to sink in, but I found it enjoyable to just let the pages float by and let the more important passages stand out on their own.

Reply
Caitlin Morgan
10/30/2012 12:28:58 pm

In regards to the most "significant" vignette, I would hold "Mango Says Goodbye Sometimes" in this title, for it is this closing passage that defines the raw message of the book, and exemplifies Esperanza's own personal growth. However, I will clarify that this was not my favorite exerpt, but simply the most vital to the understanding of the book. I would whole-heartedly advocate for the re-teaching of this book in the future. It has inspired me both as a writer, and a human being. The simplistic syntax relates to everyone, and the reader is learning (without notice) more and more of how to create a deep rhythm through writing and conveying a message.

Reply
Zoey Holmstrom
10/30/2012 12:30:20 pm

Personally, the vignette that was the most significant in this book was ‘Four Skinny Trees’. In this section, Esperanza really describes who she is as a human being. She compares herself directly to the trees in many ways. The trees are just ‘raggedy excuses planted by the city’ and they ‘do not belong here but do’ (74). I really feel this young girl’s sense of hatred and depression on Mango Street in this section. She feels like she was just dragged here to this house to live and has absolutely no purpose for living here. I loved the way she describes the trees as having a secret strength (74). Esperanza is truly stronger than she believes she is, and she too has a secret strength hidden inside of her. I can truly feel the sense of negativity towards Mango Street in this section more than any other one, and I sense the complete honesty in describing the feelings the author felt about this place as she writes this passage. I definitely think that this book should be read in years to come. I’ve enjoyed this book over all of the other text we’ve read this year, and it also had a much deeper meaning while still keeping an entertaining aspect to it. It is definitely APLACable in my mind also because it gives examples of writing styles (like writing the short vignettes) that we don’t usually come across in assigned books as students. It was a nice change, and it really opened up my eyes to see the world in many different perspectives that I hadn’t seen before.

Reply
Kathleen Risk
10/30/2012 12:33:15 pm

As many people before me have said, I believe “The Three Sisters” is the most important vignette in this book. This is where Esperanza realizes she should stop trying to escape mango street because it will always be a part of her. Mango Street was where she grew up, and it was the only true home she had ever had, whether she like it or not. Do I think this book was worth the read and that it should be read next year? I don't really know, it depends on what the other option are. This book has great rhetoric, but people may try and copy it quite unsuccessfully. It lacks a defined plot, which makes it feel like there is no amazing story that stuck with me, unlike some books we read last year like “Fahrenheit 451.” The language is great, but the story is also a very important element in a book, and that's where “The House on Mango Street” lacks.

Reply
Sara Buckle
10/30/2012 12:47:37 pm

I think that the most significant vignette was the last one, "Mango Says Goodbye Sometimes". It really pulls together the whole story, and it isn't just a loose ending like a lot of books have. It's very declarative and final, and I love how it repeats ideas from the first vignette. I love this book, and I hope that you keep it for the upcoming years! The writing is beautiful but simple, which makes it very easy to appreciate and I think that everyone can take something from it in terms of writing and analyzing.

Reply
Sam Johnson
10/30/2012 01:16:38 pm

As a book about a little girl growing up in the ghetto I definatly agree with you all the way. As a story about Mango Street I though it was a relativly opened ending because you never find out about Sally or what happens to the Monkey Garden or Mamacita, not to mention all of the future neighbors. Considering that would have taken volumns she did sum it up as best she could with the pages she had. The thought that there is an indefinite ending helps make the story have a spark to it, letting you finish the story on your own.

Reply
Richard Harris
10/30/2012 12:52:19 pm

I think the most significant vignette was The Three Sisters (Pg 103-105). Before meeting the three sisters, Esperanza's dream was to get away from Mango Street and never return. With this meeting, the sisters tell her "You will always be Mango Street." (105). After this encounter, if Esperanza were to leave Mango Street and return later in life, it is because of those unfortunate enough to do the same. I thought each section, Bums in the Attic to Mango Says Goodbye, were all very significant to building Esperanza's character, though. I felt they were all very powerful in this way.

Yes. I believe this book should be read in future APLAC classes. The overwhelming number of rhetorical devices makes the book APLACable. While the book was not my favorite, the writing style and story I thought were very unique. However, Evan Pille makes an interesting point that this type of writing won't be very practical in formal writing.

Reply
Jeremy M. Barker
10/30/2012 12:59:47 pm

I think that the most important vignette is "The Three Sisters." I thought that this specifically showed a type of development in Esperanza's character that is expressed through her connection with her local area or culture. It says that she will always be Esperanza and that she will always be Mango Street. See sees that it isn't just some place she's trying to get out of, but rather something that means a lot to her life. Mango Street is not connected to her which shows her maturity in accepting her childhood home. As for if this is APLACable, I'd say yes. Though I personally don't like the book, maybe because I don't like Spanish culture, but it had unique style and rhetoric that could be learned from. Her use of a childish perspective and choppy sentences along with the vignettes really worked well with this book. I believe that this could be helpful to anyone trying to risk any new styles. She also uses a ton of some of the rhetorical strategies that we learn about. She basically overloads the entire book with repetition. Every little vignette has several examples of repetition that emphasize her past extremely well. She also uses many similes that help the reader understand her better, which helps being that she's from a different culture and all.

Reply
Michael Gorton
10/30/2012 01:04:45 pm

I feel that either "The Three Sisters" or "Mango Says Goodbye Sometimes" were the most powerful vignette's in the entire book (103,109). Esperanza is introduced to the opposing aspect of returning to Mango by the three sisters, and realizes that she will indeed go against her initial plans to leave and never return. These two sections combined really bring out the whole change of mind within Esperanza, and are both very powerful sections with strong imagery and language once again. I feel this book is APLACable, even though I had trouble following the storyline at times. It was an enjoyable read, and I learned a lot from Cisneros style of writing.

Reply
Austin Latack
10/30/2012 01:17:10 pm

I totally agree. It was crazy how powerful and how much effect those three women had on Esperanza. That vignette really showed major character development as well. And, although it was confusing at times, like you said, I agree that it is a great book to keep.

Reply
Sam Johnson
10/30/2012 01:09:59 pm

My favorite vignettes were Sally (81-83), What Sally Said (92-93), The Monkey Garden (94-98), Red Clowns (99-100), and Linoleum Roses (101-102). I loved all of these because they were Sally’s stories and at the end that’s who I wanted to hear more of; Sally stuck with me the most. You make the argument that Esperanza is the most open ended character at the end but she isn’t. There is a parallel between her hopes and dreams and the hopes and dreams of her mother in the section called A Smart Cookie. She and her mother both have high ambitions yet her mother was strong and she never succeeded. The most realistic scenario is Esperanza conforms to her mother’s footsteps staying on Mango Street until she dies. The significant difference between her and Sally is that I care to know what happens in her death (where she dies, how old she is, who she’s with, how she dies, etc.) Perhaps Suzy feels so much more fascinating because there are so many “Suzy’s” in real life.
Of course this novel is APLACable. Think of how many students have already said that this book has been beneficial in expanding their voice in their writing. It would be worth it if it improved one students writing let alone half the class. This and it is the best example of consistently engaging imagery that we have had all year. Keep it.

Reply
Courtney Bennett
10/30/2012 02:07:39 pm

I also liked the vignettes that told Sally's story. I found that reading about Sally was a lot more interesting than reading about Esperanza, mainly because a lot more happened to Sally and she has a lot more depth to her character. I think she is the most dynamic character of the book.

Reply
Austin Latack
10/30/2012 01:14:05 pm

Personally, I think the most important vignette is "A House of my Own." Although it is incredibly short, it, finally, directly confronts Esperanza's desire throughout the whole book. In almost all of the vignettes preceding this one, she mentions how unhappy people in her community, including her, are with their living conditions. She always indirectly mentions how nice it would be to have a house on her own, but in "A House of My Own" she finally details exactly what she wants. She sounds so determined to surpass her expected house when she is older, and attain the freedom of owning her own house and living the way she desires.

Although I wouldn't agree with what I'm saying now, yesterday, I definitely believe "The House on Mango Street" is APLACable. I hated the book to begin with because it was written so differently than any other piece I've read and I questioned why you would even consider this weird, confusing book. But, that's exactly what makes it a good book to read for this class. It takes us out of our comfort zone to experience new views, in a whole new writing style to most of us. The extended metaphors in almost every vignette challenge us as readers to try and analyze foreign syntax, diction, and overall structure. This challenge will not only better prepare us for the AP test in May, but make it easier for us to accommodate common writing in the future, or even change our writing styles. So yes, please keep it, but maybe in the future, have a longer class discussion on each chapter and it's overall message(s).

Reply
Mason Freehling
10/30/2012 01:32:09 pm

Esperanza does finally describe what she would want her house to be, and I think that is an incredibly powerful passage as well. Specifically, she knows what she wants so she won't end up like all the people currently living in her neighborhood.

Reply
Mason Freehling
10/30/2012 01:27:38 pm

“The Three Sisters” is by far the most significant vignette of the novel. Esperanza hits a humongous turning point in her life on Mango Street in this passage. Before, the one goal in her life was to escape from the dreaded Mango Street, but after an old lady talks with her for a few minutes she discovers more purpose in her life. She has forgotten about those who love her and cannot so easily leave this life on Mango Street. The old lady truly makes her appreciate more things in her life, perhaps out of guilt, but still it is improved. The House on Mango Street should most certainly be kept for upcoming years. Sandra Cisneros uses a unique writing style that I quite enjoy. One thing about this book is it teaches a different style of writing; however the best thing about this book by far is its immense amount of detailed imagery.

Reply
Danielle Keenan
10/30/2012 01:30:55 pm

Out of Sandra Cisneros novel I felt that Mango Says Goodbye Sometimes was the most significant part. It seems to sum up the novel. The last three sentences which are “They will not know I have gone away to come back. For the ones I left behind. For the ones who cannot out.” make it so important, it ends the novel in the way that her differences make her stronger. She getting out of the ways that were set before her and she’s creating a new path and she going to come back to help girls of that neighborhood do the same. I definitely do think you should keep reading this book. I have learned that there is more to writing then what teaches have out in front of me and it makes me want to write. I think it is APLACable because with in her vignettes she uses many rhetorical stratiegies.

Reply
Owen Carow
10/30/2012 01:51:50 pm

As I read this book, I was always waiting for the payoff. I got the sense that all of the contrasting vignettes were building towards something a bit more coherent. When I got to "Mango Says Goodbye Sometimes", the story seemed to click. This chapter was the most significant because it brings the story full circle. In the beginning of the book Esperanza regards the house as an embarrassing reminder of how little her family had, saying that pointing out where she lived made her "feel like nothing" (5). The final chapter ties this back in. The sad little house on Mango street might not have been what she wanted, but it became her home, who she was. Mango Street has its flaws and its residents are sometimes unsavory, but they get through life together.

The House on Mango Street gave me a lot of enjoyment and thought considering its length. It was an easy read, but it had an incredible amount of content crammed inside. Every time I picked up the book it felt like thoughts and ideas were shooting into my brain, which was a relief after digging through drier portions of other selections this year. I definitely think you should continue this book in your lesson plan, it showed me so much about writing style and rhetorical strategies in such an effortless way.

Reply
Courtney Bennett
10/30/2012 01:56:28 pm

I cannot pick any other vignette that is more significant than “The Three Sisters”. It connects every other vignette and reveals an overarching point for the entire book. Esperanza grows as a character here when a new perspective of Mango Street is revealed to her. It is explained to her that she cannot merely escape Mango Street. Everything that happened to her in the other vignettes and all the people she knew will forever be a part of her. Wherever she may go, she cannot undo Mango Street's affect on her. And while her success in life is foreshadowed, she is also reminded not to forget those who will never escape Mango Street. I thought that was a very enlightening moment for Esperanza, as well as an important turning point in the book.
Yes, I think you should keep “The House on Mango Street” for the future students and yes, I think it is very APLACable! It helped me learn that a message can be conveyed in a variety of different word choices and syntax. More specifically, it taught me that extravagant words are not always needed in order to create something great. Sometimes words and sentences that are more simple are better. I also found that description, imagery, and rhetorical devices do not need to be sacrificed when simplistic language is used.

Reply
Evan Kiel
10/30/2012 09:13:57 pm

I agree with the part about how she cannot escape Mango Street but what you made me question was whether she would only be successful if she remembered or if she would be successful no matter what and they just wanted her to remember.

Reply
Kathleen Janeschek
10/30/2012 02:24:41 pm

The most significant passage in this book is "The Monkey Garden," for this passage captures both of the major themes in The House on Mango Street: how growing up on Mango Street affects Esperanza and her struggle to grow up. The garden and its progression show the effects of Mango Street; the garden starts as a beautiful, undisturbed place, but over time was dirtied and ruined, brimming with junk (95). This change reflects the change many residents of the street experience- they come full of hopes and beauty and they become nothing but dried up shells of their former selves. The garden is an Eden and the residents are Adam and Eve, and it is an inevitable truth that they will fall from grace. Another theme of the book that is demonstrated here, is Esperanza waiting to be grown up and a child at the same time. She longs to play games, and she longs to be with her friend, but she cannot have both. That is not how this works. That is against the rules. She tries to choose Sally, but she sees the "game" their playing through a child's eyes- where the boys are bullies and the girls don't like them. She is wrong. Wrong game. The others ostracize her for her sin against what is expected, and she is left there, struggling to cope with this new reality of flirting and "games." Her desperation to be grown up is obvious at this point, and so is her inability to leave childhood.

I think this book should be taught in future APLAC classes. It was a breath of fresh air, a break from thick novels with complicated vocabulary and run-on sentences. It demonstrated how simple things can be the most powerful. For that reason, it should become a staple of APLAC books.

Reply
Darcy Copeland
10/30/2012 02:29:44 pm

I think the most important vignette to the story is "Mango Says Goodbye Sometimes" (109). In this last section, it seems that Ezperanza really comes to terms with who she is, although she might not like it. In the chapters throughout the entire book, especially towards the end, it becomes clearer how ashamed she is of her way of life and of herself as a person due to the resentment she feels towards her community and especially towards Sally for not saving her.

APLAC students should definitely continue reading this. It's a very short read, but it's so powerful. The way Cisneros writes is phenomenal--she's not straight forward with her writing, she doesn't directly reveal the plot, but rather shows a community through the eyes of a young girl. It has helped me, personally, with the idea of showing versus telling.

Reply
Evan Kiel
10/30/2012 09:07:39 pm

I cant really decide which Vignette is more important to the story but I feel that it is either "The Three Sisters" or "Mango Says Goodbye Sometimes". I feel like both of these parts are saying basically the same thing. That she will leave Mango street and go on to do better things but she must remember Mango street and where she came from because she must come back for those who cant escape on there own. The only difference is that in "Mango Says Goodbye Sometimes" she is accepting the fact that she will not be stuck there forever and she can escape and her dreams might just come true.
This book should be taught to future APLAC students. It is extremely well written with its plethora of Rhetorical Devices. It also shows another style of writing through vignettes that is not often taught or seen. Before this AP level, i didn't even know "Speak" was vignette style. The fact that it is short just shows its power and also makes our lives a little easier.

Reply
Justin Marutz
10/30/2012 09:37:52 pm

Yeah I have to agree with Evan on the subject. At the end it just brings forth the sense of a resolution and that one day she will be free. Before this book I wasn't very familiar in the vignette style of wrtitng, which i hink is a very intresting style of writing.

Reply
Kaitlyn Wase
10/31/2012 12:20:46 am

I didn't know Speak was a vignette either. I agree with you fully. Cisneros did a fantastic job with these two sections

Reply
Carley Grau
10/30/2012 09:18:21 pm

Although there are many important vignettes in the book, I thought "The Three Sisters" was a very important one for Esperanza directly. When Esperanza made her wish to leave, one of the sisters reminded her who she was and that she must always come back for the people she knows. She reminded her that she can't run away from who she is by leaving the street. I definitely think this book should stay, it took not even a week because it was so short and everyone can pick up something on writing from the word choice, even if you don't like the plot of the book just the way the author puts things makes it fun to read.

Reply
Justin Marutz
10/30/2012 09:32:58 pm

The most significant vignette on “The House on Mango Street” was Mango Says Goodbye Sometimes. It is one of the most significant of the book due to it concluding the book in such an elegant way. Telling Esperenza’s story of where she lived, but out of all those places Mango Street remains in her mind, forever being a part of her. A woman that dreams of being able to get her own mail while stuck in a house, but not a home she wants to be a part of (109). She has been driven to write and with this writes of going away, being free, already knowing someday she will be. Knowing she leaves to come back, though others are not as fortunate as her (110). This vignette just describes the older Esperenza and what she knows will happen someday so well, with a fitting conclusion. Though she hated the house on Mango Street it was a part of her and though someday she’ll come back, her home will be waiting for her return and with paper and a pen she’ll write. Without a doubt the book should be brought back next year. The book is incredibly APLACable with its tons of rhetoric and style. Helping teach that less can be more as well as its fantastic descriptions, and use of vignettes instead of just a regular novel. Adding to a more knowledgeable writer/reader.

Reply
Kyle Frazier
10/30/2012 09:45:20 pm

I thought the most significant vignette was Alicia & I Talking on Edna's Steps. This is the most significant because Esperanza directly denies that she was from Mango Street. She says, "I on't belong. I don't ever want to come here" (106). Alicia denies that, saying like it or not, you do live there. Ultimatly, Esperanza indirectly says that she is going to make Mango Street a better place to live. Chuckling when thinking that the mayor is going to make it better, and then says "Not the mayor", insinuating she makes it a better place in the future (107). Yes, I think you should continue reading this book in future years. The book is filled with many different rhetorical strategies, and Cisnero really teaches you about a different approach to writing a story. She teaches the use of multiple similes, using vignettes, and how to tell a story based on a culture perspective, instead of a plot. This book should be continued to be read in future years.

Reply
Lauren Clem
10/30/2012 10:34:44 pm

Personally, the most significant vignette of the entire novel would be “The Three Sisters” because of the way it was written and because of the message it sent. It was full of rhetorical devices that really helped show the imagery of the particular scene and the important details to the main point. The quote, “When you leave you must always remember to come back…” (105) is a powerful quote that is not said once, but twice, to prove its importance. The three sisters represent Esperenza’s role models, people that she gets confused by because she is a young girl, but also people that she can learn from. Overall, this chapter really showed the importance of having a house on Mango Street and was the point where young Esperenza finally realized what was truly acceptable as a house with a loving family around her.
I do also believe that this book is definitely APLACable. It is an easy read, which is convenient for busy high school students, but it is nothing to moan and groan about because it has so much to offer. The writing style, word choice, narration perspective, and the overall tone and message makes the book appealing to all kinds of readers.

Reply
Kylie Wermund
10/30/2012 10:39:31 pm

I found Bums in the Attic to be the most significant vignette of the entire novel. I think what makes this so powerful is the line "One day I'll have my own house, but I won't forget who I am or where I came from" (87). She wants a nice house that she can call her own, but she doesn't want to turn out stuck up like all of the people with houses on the hills. I think it's also cute how she says that she will invite bums in and let them stay. That's something that a child would say.

I think classes should keep reading this in years to come. It is plastered with rhetorical devices that can be helpful in writing our own papers. The writing style this book is very interesting and unusual which would be good for students to see.

Reply
Marcus Shannon
10/30/2012 11:03:05 pm

The Born Bad vignette seems to be the best vignette in the entire book because of its tone compared to earlier in the book. "Most likely I will go to hell and most likely I deserve to be there" shows how she matured and how she understands her actions. Making fun of a dying Aunt Lupe was a horrible thing, and she finally shows her maturity by accepting what she did. Compared to the chapter with Louie's cousin and how he was carted right off to jail and the kids didn't take a second to think about what he did.

I think you should keep giving this piece out because it's not only APLACable in the writing style by showing imagery and vignettes, but also it tells a personal story. This serves as an example for what a writer can do if they write about something personal, and how impactful it can be to the reader.

Reply
Kaitlyn Wade
10/31/2012 12:18:37 am

Three Sisters was the most striking vignette of the entire novel to me. I loved the line that said," when you leave you must remember to come back for the others. A circle, understand? You will always be Esperanza. You will always be Mango Street. You can't erase what you know. You can't forget who you are (105)." That paragraph seemed in my mind like it was bold and underlined. I was shocked at how well Cisneros tied in the entire book. Esperanza hated her life and who she was throughout the entire book, but this vignette was the turning point. Every sentence after this vignette gave me a sense that Esperanza is learning to accept who she is and where she came from. I definitely think that this book needs to remain in APLAC. Not only did I enjoy reading it, I was given more examples of how to successfully include the rhetorical devices in my writing. I have a hard time overwriting, but this book served as an example of how to get it done in less words. Some people find vignettes confusing as far as plot is concerned, but I personally love them. I have acted in vignettes, and it is a facinating style of writing.

Reply
Jeff Lueders
10/31/2012 06:27:55 am

Four Skinny Trees is the most striking vignette in the book, at least for me. The trees in this case create a direct analogy to life on Mango Street and it creates a deeper understanding of the struggle it takes to survive while living there. It masterfully displays what life is like on Mango Street by describing the growth of the trees, how they grow down even through concrete, and how they grow upward to reach above Mango Street. Four Skinny Trees shows how to survive in Mango Street. As for the book itself, it is definitely APLACable. It shows great amounts of rhetorical devices and is an easy book to read since it is so short, but also because it is expertly written. Please keep this book for APLAC classes of the future.

Reply
10/1/2013 02:55:31 pm

The secret of a leader lies in the tests he has faced over the whole course of his life and the habit of action he develops in meeting those tests.

Reply
Jack Dicenson
4/10/2014 02:51:25 am

not a very good rely i do no agree with you although your argument is substantial.

Reply
Jill Jenner
7/31/2014 10:23:25 am

May I have an example of foreshadowing in the House on Mango Street.

Reply



Leave a Reply.