Today, we discussed the rhetorical device of satire. It's a very popular technique in today's mainstream world, but often the most misunderstood technique on the AP test! Let's look at it a little more, and hopefully have some fun while doing it. If you are feeling like you need more clarity on what satire is and how to recognize it, read this short article before you move on. 

For this assignment, please read/view the following: 

#1: Article on The Onion website (warning: one swear word; email me if you need another option)
#2: YouTube video about Facebook
#3: Controversial New Yorker Cover July 2008

Once you've looked at those three things, write a paragraph or so that considers the following: 1)What is being satirized? 2) What techniques does the piece use to build satire? and 3)What is your reaction to each one?

Remember to proofread your writing and to respond to one other person. 
Maddie Williams
1/7/2013 04:09:38 am

In the first selection, the article on The Onion, I think that our country's addiction to news and having to know everything is being satirized. It takes aim at the fact that Americans go crazy over news and gossip and having to be the first to know everything. The author uses many techniques to achieve this. The tone of the article is very matter-of-fact, and mimics the format of a real news report, including quotes from people. It is a direct parody of media and news and how big of a deal it is today. My initial reaction was that its really funny. It really is accurate with how information-obsessed our country is, and it made me laugh. The video about Facebook that I watched next was not only satirizing the obvious, Facebook, but more importantly the "couch potato" who has no life. The video antagonizes the kind of people that sit around on the computer all day, "Facebook Stalking" people they don't actually know, and living their lives online. The creator of the video uses techniques such as caricature: exaggerating the mans sallow, pale skin, bathrobe and blood shot eyes because he has been staring at the screen too long. It also utilizes wit, as the man describes the groups he organized his friends into. The categories are not only funny and descriptive, but also brutally straightforward. I think that this video was quite funny, but it was also kind of sad. It's a bummer that some people waste themselves and their gifts in this way. The last selection satirized Obama and his care for our country. It seems to question the idea that Obama is really on our side. The artist of the drawing used techniques such as mocking Obama and his wife's fist pump, drew the American flag in the fireplace, placed a turban on Obama's head, and dressed Mrs. Obama in a terrorist outfit. The artist also blew up Obama's head; an act of caricature that suggests his cockiness and bad judgement. It also has a bit of burlesque, as it turns a serious political issue into a lighthearted joke. It was a good artistic demonstration of satire, but I thought it was a bit harsh, and showed disrespect to the leader of our country.

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Emma Chester
1/7/2013 05:06:45 am

Oh, I didn't think of the first one that way, but it totally makes sense! Because the media is obsessed with pointless drama and useless information.I definitely agree with your interpretation of the video; I noticed the same aspects. I also am on the same page as you with the last example; it was clever and a good use of satire, but it was harsh.

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Danielle Curley
1/7/2013 06:42:57 am

I didn't take the first one that way either but that is true and i agree with what you said about how Americans are news crazy and have to be the first to know stuff.

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Danielle Keenan
1/7/2013 09:35:10 am

I agree with your description of the obama picture. i agree it was very disresectful and harsh

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Kasey Shoemaker
1/7/2013 11:04:06 am

I totally agree with you that our nation is information-obsessed and it was so easily spotted in “The Onion” article. I noticed the same things in the Video. It really is sad that people waste talents like that. The third was really disrespectful of our President, though we might not like his decisions he is our leader.

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1/7/2013 11:17:34 am

Your thoughts on the first article are interesting! I did not even think about it that way and that makes me giggle because That seems so obvious now that I think about it. But I thought the article was outrageously funny as well!

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Kelsey Berndt
1/7/2013 11:22:38 am

I didn't think of the fact that Obama's head being enlarged implied cockiness until I read your take.

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Emma Chester
1/7/2013 05:03:22 am

In the article from The Onion, I think that the idea that no one really reads these info boards is being satirized. The writer does this by exaggerating about how huge the lines were and how important these newsletters and fliers are, even though in reality, not many people revel in the contents of the bulletin boards they come across. The writer also satirizes this concept by using a serious tone and including examples of the "exciting" things that happen when new papers are pinned up and how intent the community is on finding out the information. I thought that this article was really humorous and easy to relate to, as I never read the fliers on bulletin boards. The video is satirizing the way that people obsess over social networks like Facebook, even though it's kind of pointless. The video uses things like caricature, or how the guy speaking looks like a social outcast and like he rarely leaves the house to actually spend time with people, and a serious tone when describing his Facebook experience to do this.My reaction is that I thought it was funny and pretty accurate of what people do on Facebook. The last example, the New Yorker cover satirizes Barack and Michelle Obama and their views on certain things. It does this by exaggerating particular things about them and emphasizing different aspects by what they're wearing and their expressions.It includes portrait of Osama bin Laden and has Obama dressed as a Middle-Eastern man, and Michelle is dressed as a soldier. They both look sneaky and foolish, which is most likely what the artist was trying to convey. I found it somewhat rude and disrespectful, though it was successful in portraying what it meant to.

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Zoey Holmstrom
1/7/2013 05:25:24 am

I like the point you made that no one really cares about the content of bulletin boards. I know I usually never really get into depth with them either. The fact that people in the town went so crazy over a news board is pretty bizarre to think about.

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Kaytlynn Toering
1/7/2013 06:29:02 am

That's a good point about The Onion article! I didnt look at it that way. You would think that no one would be obsessed with the bulletin boards and it is true that most people dont need them.

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Maddie Williams
1/7/2013 08:00:53 am

I totally see what you mean about the board in the coffee shop now, Emma! I didn't look at it that way. I agree with you now that I see it from your perspective; it can also be viewed in that way.

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Zoey Holmstrom
1/7/2013 05:21:54 am

The first selection I read was the article in The Onion. The fact that society is obsessed with being 'in the know' is being satirized. It mocks news and media in the fact that people are always desiring to acquire the latest news whether it is important or not. The tone of the article is very serious and factual. The author makes it seem like this event actually happened. Figurative language is apparent with the use of hyperbole and exaggeration of the subject. The author blows up the event and makes it a huge deal in this 'town's' society. This made me think of the news and tabloids that make it seem as they know every detail of the event that they are reporting. The media diminishes the hunger of a society's need for news.The FaceBook video was a clever take on the famous social network. FaceBook is obviously being satirized, but also that people are obsessed with pointless things, like categorizing their 'friends' on social networking sites. This horation form of satire is built from many tools. Parody is used to directly make fun of FaceBook itself, and the people that lay around and waste the day endlessly scrolling down the news feed and categorizing their friends into pointless categories. The maker of the video was pretty witty. He/she kept me entertained throughout the whole 3 minutes. It also obviously uses allusion as a device because it clearly says 'FaceBook' many times and uses it as the title. The video was entertaining to watch. It made me realize how silly FaceBook can be. The author very creatively put this video together. The magazine article was very interesting to look at. The photograph is satirizing the belief that Obama was siding with the terrorists instead of protecting the American people. The artist used a caricature to make Obama's head much bigger than his body to make him seem like an air head, or big headed. The artist also uses lots of irony in the picture as well. An American flag burns in the fireplace, which is very frowned upon in the United States. Also, a picture of Osama Bin Laden hangs above the burning flag. Obama and his 'wife' do their traditional fist bumping while she seems to be dressed as a terrorist. The artist is very witty in the fact that he makes Obama seem like the exact opposite of what he expressed in his political campaign.

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Sara Buckle
1/7/2013 05:54:30 am

The satirical article in "The Onion" mocks the American obsession with knowing everything about everything, even if it does not affect them at all. They get all worked up about things, get excited in the chitter chatter, and enjoy being the first to know this and that, but don't really do anything with their knowledge, which is a pattern I have certainly noticed, so I appreciate the writing topic. The writer exaggerates a lot, making the people incredibly excited about little things to show how truly ridiculous the concept is. The Youtube video about Facebook makes a good point that Facebook is kind of pathetic. People get on there to read up on other people's lives, even if they aren't actually close in real life. He calls it a "multiplayer game" which makes a lot of sense, because Facebook absolutely is a popularity contest in several aspects. I also agreed with the message behind the video. On the magazine cover, Obama is portrayed as someone who is siding with the wrong team. He is wearing a turban, has an American flag burning in his fireplace, and a portrait of Osama bin Laden. The cover made me really uncomfortable, but the artist makes his point that Obama is not who he claims to be as a leader.

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1/7/2013 07:18:17 am

I agree with you on all the points you make. All these forms of satire were portrayed they way the authors intended but I feel the same way you did about the cover, I was very uncomfortable looking at it as well.

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Kaytlynn Toering
1/7/2013 06:27:20 am

The first item containing satire was the article from The Onion. In this piece, it talks about how many obsessed people stood outside the door of this little shop trying to find out the news before everyone else. It's portraying nosy Americans and how they always need to know everything before their neighbor. Not only this, but how quickly news spreads once it is released and the chatter that insinuates around it that may not be productive. The author treats this piece as a real life news report by adding in quotes and opinions from people. At first glance, the tone is completely serious and factual, but readers eventually realize there is much sarcasm involved throughout the piece. It was quite humorous. The portrayal of how serious the issue was to many people and how dedicated they were to getting in line so early was very funny. The second piece is the YouTube video. Facebook is accurately portrayed in the pale man sitting at the computer talking about the game everyone loves to play. This game is Facebook where people try to get the most friends, even if you don’t know them. The guy talks about how he divides his friends into categories, the largest being those he has never met and will never meet, in addition to unavailable girls he stalks on the Internet. This whole piece accurately portrays the addiction people have to Facebook and other electronic devices. He uses caricatures to create tired eyes that have been focused on the screen for too long as well as the monotone voice, making people think he has never had a conversation before. It was very funny and was so completely true. The third piece is from the cover of the New Yorker. On it, the Obama’s are in the Oval Office and are portrayed negatively based on opinions. A flag is seen burning in the fireplace and a framed photo of Osama Bin Laden in hanging on the wall. President Obama is dressed in a toga and turban while Michelle is dressed as a solider holding a gun, as if they were partners in a terrorist attack. Many people view this as so, as if we have a terrorist in the White House. The illustrator uses many colors and different symbols to illustrate his point. Obama is seen with a huge head and you can tell by their stances that they are up to something. I agree with Emma: it is very disrespectful to portray this like that. But its people’s opinions and could be true to some people.

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Kaity Wade
1/7/2013 08:36:10 am

I didn't even think about his eyes! I was more hearing what he was saying, but you're right, the way he looks is creepy, and does show addiction to Facebook. I thought it was funny.

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Danielle Curley
1/7/2013 06:46:00 am

In the article from the Onion the author was mocking civilization and how people aren’t usually interested in what is going on in their community. People don’t usually look at flyers that are on bulletin boards in public places. The techniques the author used to build the satire were hyperbole and sarcasm. I found the article to be slightly humorous because of the exaggeration of the people who read the flyer. The youtube video was mocking the way everyone has a Facebook and gains as many friends as they can when in reality they don’t really know them, don’t talk to them and aren’t really friends with them. The video uses a serious tone to build the satire. I found the video to be kind of weird but I do agree that people are friends with a ton of people on Facebook who they don't know or don't talk to. The magazine cover is mocking the president and the way he runs the country. It suggests that he is on a different side. I thought it was kind of harsh.

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CollililililHala
1/7/2013 07:19:13 am

I agreed with you on how you saw the first article. Not very many people know what is going on around their community unless someone shouts it at them, let alone find it out on their own.

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1/7/2013 07:12:03 am

In the first article produced by the Onion, I believe they are satirizing the idea of people nowadays having to know what is going on in the world right away. Nothing can be kept a secret and all information is put out on social media sites or the internet for all to see. The techniques used in this piece to convey the satire were the way the article read, it was written very seriously and acted like it was a truthful report. I found this article to be funny but true at the same time because this is how our society runs today. In the second article about Facebook, the video was satirizing the fact that now all people worry about is how many friends or followers they have on a social networking site and it does not even matter if they truly know that person. Also, how today everyone spends hours in front of computers screen instead of going out into the real world. The video used a cartoon character that was wearing a robe, had bright yellow teeth, and speaking very laid back because he was being portrayed as a lazy bum who wasn’t planning on doing anything but looking at his computer screen. I enjoyed this video as well, it made me laugh but I also find it depressing this is what our culture is becoming. The final picture was depicting President Obama and the first lady as being untrue to our countries values. The picture shows Obama wearing a Turban and Middle- eastern traditional clothing and Michelle Obama wearing an assault rifle and combat clothing. In the fireplace an American flag is burning and above that is a picture Osama bin Laden or a leader to another nation. I think The New Yorker was able to describe their message through this picture although I personally find it offensive and disrespectful to show the leaders of our country in this way.

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Taylor Dale
1/7/2013 10:04:46 am

I have to agree with you on the first one, althought that was not how I saw it when I first read it. I like the part when you mention how people spending hours on the computure and not going to see the real world. I basically agree with you on the last one. I thought the picture depicted more on his back ground.

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Evan Scieszka
1/7/2013 07:12:34 am

The first article in The Onion was satirizing the fact that Americans often feel the need to be the first to see or get something whether it be information, news, or something else. They also mention how Americans often do not care how they get what they want, just as long as they get it. The entire piece was basically an extended metaphor, using the residents to represent the average Americans and the bulletin board to represent information. It is kind of a burlesque in that it takes a humorous matter and makes it into a serious news report to make an overall point. I thought that it was very humorous in the way that it over exaggerated and spoke figuratively of bulletin boards to give a point of something much larger. The video about Facebook was meant to satirize the multiple people that use Facebook to feel like they have lives and gain as many friends as possible. It is a caricature because it uses the one person to portray the many Facebook users and make a point about those people. Although it was kind of creepy it was still very true and humorous. The last piece was the New Yorker cover which is used to make the point that the author feels that Obama is not doing enough to stop terrorist organizations to the extent that he is on their side. This is certainly a caricature because it is portraying President Obama as a person. Dramatic irony is also used because most people are certain that President Obama is not a terrorist, but the cartoon makes that point anyway. Honestly I felt that the cover went a bit far in showing its point. To make the point that the leader of our country is hurting so much that he is a terrorist is to far, even for the New Yorker.

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Dylan Gustafson
1/7/2013 07:17:04 am

I like your description about the picture of Obama and how it is not describing him essentially, just describing other people.

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Dylan Gustafson
1/7/2013 07:14:02 am

In "The Onion," it satirizes the fact that Americans are people who must know the latest trending news, and how they have to know about everything and anything. Techniques such as overstatement and hyperboles are used to express this idea. For example, when it says that the whole neighborhood gets in line that stretches outside and around the store, and when the student was holding the piece of paper that gave "tabla lessons." I like the article, it was quite entertaining to read. With the Facebook video, it shows that too many people are obsessed with it. They go on the website for entertainment on other people's lives, hence " getting an arousal from a "relationship status." Also, when it says that Facebook is a "role-playing game," it is describing that a lot of people try and garner as many friends friends as they can when they are online. The creator of the video uses techniques such as the way he portrays the life of the guy he used in the video, an outcast who gets joy for being able to have so many friends when he does not have many in real life. I thought the video was funny and not boring at all. In the last one, the illustrator of the photo describes how he/she thinks that Barack and Michelle Obama are secretly terrorists entering the White House, even though it is dated July 2008, and they are possibly dangerous threats. Techniques used to portray this are things the like the American flag burning in the fire, the portrait of Osama Bin Laden above the fireplace, the assault rifle on the back of Mrs. Obama, and of course the clothing that Obama is wearing, the turban, sandals, etc. My first thought of this was how did this get through to the shelves? It surprised that nobody tried to stop the author of the picture because it is so controversial. Anyways, I did not really like it because it is a tad bit judgmental.

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Evan Scieszka
1/7/2013 07:27:55 am

I concur with many of your insights on the Facebook video, the arousal and the role playing comments were creepy, but they got his point across.

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Samir Shah
1/7/2013 08:40:15 am

I really like how you mentioned the hyperbole. Also how you showed the specific facebook features the author used to further explain his point. Another thing I like is how you showed the features of the photo like the flag burning to show how the author is exaggerating what Obama is doing.

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Colli Hala
1/7/2013 07:16:36 am

The first article, from the site named after the Allium cepa, mocked the way Americans view the news. I kind of thought of it in two ways. One was how Americans care about mostly useless information that doesn't really affect them. The other way I can see it is by portraying the opposite of what people do, which is ignore the news all together. The author uses the techniques of sarcasm in the sense of no one really flocks over bulletin boards, and caricature because of how the author exaggerates how some people obsess over mostly unimportant details. I found this article quite humorous. The Facebook video makes fun of people who accept their 8,000 friend requests while they know about 200 of them. I also kind of think it mocks people who waste their lives away in computer games, and don't actually have many real friends. It shows the stereotypes of these people, all wrapped up into one person. The creator of the video, entitled "Somegreybloke," parodies these people. The entire video is in a serious tone. I thought it was kinda funny, and accurately describes the stereotypical internet dweller. The final example, the magazine cover, is a mockery of where Obama is going with the country. It shows him as a terrorist himself, which is the opposite of what he is supposed to be. The entire illustration is mostly the opposite of what a president and the Oval Office should look like, with Osama Bin Laden and a burning flag. This is mostly sarcasm. I thought it was a bit exaggerated and a bit too rough.

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Lauren Clem
1/7/2013 11:20:54 am

I really like how you interpreted the first article in two different ways. I do agree with both, but didn’t really notice the second one until you pointed it out.

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Evan Pille
1/7/2013 07:44:47 am

In regards to The Onion's article, the item being satirized was the relevance of bulletin boards. They're put up every day and yet most people just walk by them with out even looking at them. To show this, the article describes a town where the people are crazy about "the board", quite contrary to reality. They don't just read it, they camp outside for days to get the first look at it, a reference to those who camp out for shopping. i found it slightly amusing, but it didn't bring anything of real interest to my mind.

The Facebook video gave a satirical view of the usefulness of social networking sites. By describing the point of the "game" as to get the most friends, he shows that there really isn't a point at all. he also tells of the hours he's spent on the site showing the true story of how people will spend hours on a website doing nothing of productivity or even entertainment. Personally, I found it entertaining and quite frankly true.

The cover of "The New Yorker" proved to be interesting due to its blatant portrayal of the president as a terrorist. The was no mistaking that interpretation with the American flag burning in the fire place, a portrait of Osama bin ladin hanging on the wall, and the President with the first lady dressed up as terrorists doing their signature fist-bump.My initial reaction to this was one of ridicule. It would have seemed the artist simply did not like president Obama so they pictured them as a terrorist. But then it got me thinking, what if the artist's point was to say that Obama really is, in some ways, a terrorist? After all, doesn't the President order drone strikes killing dozens every day? Does he not keep tabs on our very phone calls? I personally don't see him as a terrorist but that idea may not be too far off for some people.

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Mason Freehling
1/7/2013 08:25:55 am

I like how you sympathized with the cover. Sure, it's disrespectful to America, but there will always be opponents of whoever is in the oval office.

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Colby Clark
1/7/2013 08:49:05 am

Your thoughts about the New Yorker cover were very interesting. I wouldn't be surprised if a decent handful of Americans do think he is a terrorist. I think the illustrator might have been satirizing this fear in the American people as much as displaying his own dissatisfaction.

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Richard Harrris
1/7/2013 10:06:56 am

Evan, I felt we had very similar thoughts for most of this assignment but one thing that struck me for some reason was how you say, "...doesn't the President order drone strikes killing dozens every day?". Again, I don't like Obama but I feel that the president ordering drone strikes to kill terrorists does not make him a terrorist. I understand that you were just throwing that idea out there but he's not ordering bombs to be placed in trash bags to blow up anything that approaches it, like actual terrorists do. That's my two pennies, though.

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Owen Carow
1/7/2013 01:06:53 pm

Interesting, my interpretations couldn't be farther than yours for some of these. For the first one I didn't think it was really about bulletin boards at all, but rather the news itself, and how people grow overly attached to it. For the New Yorker cover, if you realize that it's satire, you'll see that it's actually more in Obama's favor than against him. It shows him dressed up as a terrorist just to show the ridiculousness of it, rather than to say, right out, that he's a terrorist. You obviously can have a different opinion, that's fine, but I don't think that was the cartoon's intent.

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Zachary Grover
1/7/2013 08:10:42 am

While reading, the article stuck out to me as being satirical of Americans and how the news can be like a bulletin board. They relay the story to you, however most is random facts that for most mean nothing. It also satires about how Americans find it necessary to be right there and have everything that happens transparent. Also it displays how people in general wants specific informtion as shown with te guy and the tabla lessons.

The second satire displays facebookas a viideo game. This satire showschow social networking is as much social as it is for bragging rights and entertainment. While the stereotypical Facebook is having your friends on the site actually be your real friends. While this video displays Facebook satirically but accurately satirically by saying it is much more like wanting friends to create the facade that you are popular. When as this guy shows it just makes you seem sad. It also satires cyberbullying. When he begins to talk about how he can look at girls photos. That statement very clearly states I am a cyberstalker.

The last article talks about what many thought Obama was going to be a sneaky terrorist favoring president. It slams his foreign polocies by displaying Obama in terrorist clothes fist bumping Michelle Obama who is also dressed as a terrorist. Also with the burning flag it is sati ring that even hough he is president America will burn and turn to ashes under his presidency.

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Jeremy M. Barker
1/7/2013 08:39:43 am

I personally thought the first one, the Onion one, was more an exaggeration on peoples' excitement for local news that effects them, rather than focusing on how they generally get stuck on little details of broader topics. As for your other articles go, I can mostly agree.

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Kaitlyn Wade
1/7/2013 08:14:22 am

The first time i read the article from The Onion, I thought for sure they were poking fun at the craziness of Black Friday. Then, I remembered that the date was important, so I looked at it and realized that the satire wasn't in mocking crazy shopping for pointless things, but our society's excessive want for the latest information, and there need for it right away. With social media and internet, we obviously don't need to be crazy with waiting for a bulletin board for useless information, but we do about everything else to find out the same pointless information. I thought this article shows the brutal reality of today's society. We are crazy to know everything; even things that don't mean anything important to life and I think this article was awesome in making a harsh reality humorous. The youTube video was very strange to me. Once I got over the weird blue thing on the screen, and started listening to it, it was funny. Facebook is made fun of a ton, but this one was the most true one I have seen. The strange guy on the screen shared the truth of facebook, and how people are not themselves online. On this form of social media, you can be whoever you want, make your friends who you want, and have a life you only wish you have. The best part was when it mentioned the person he added as a friend because he was persistent. Finally, the picture satires, obviously, president Obama, but it addresses the controversy to his presidency initially. People thought because of his rumored background, he was some kind of terrorist. Personally, even if I don't believe in everything our presidents do, this is really disrespectful. I think they are trying to say that Obama is trying to destroy America. Its a disturbing cover.

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Katelyn Tillstrom
1/7/2013 09:02:45 am

I definitely picked up on the whole Black Friday thing too. I know what you mean about checking the date; that makes it seem a lot more clear. I like what you said about being whover you want to be online too. That little guy sure says it like it is, even if he doesn't know it yet!

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Mason Freehling
1/7/2013 08:22:48 am

In the article from The Onion, I feel people and their need to know everything is being satirized. A lot of people can’t get enough of the news, but I believe it goes beyond that. I think that just Americans and the obsessions with getting their hands on whatever they think looks a little interesting is the main point. The technique used was making it just like a real report for the news. The video on Facebook was satirizing Facebook of course, but that’s pretty much 100% true. I feel everyone does just want to have the highest number of friends. How many of these people do they actually know? Probably about 20% of their ‘friends.’ The piece on the photos hits home too, even though it sounds a bit creepy, I'm pretty sure everyone has done that at least once in their life, whether meaning to or not. The cartoon of the president and first lady was actually pretty funny. I'm not going to lie, that was the only one that made me laugh. It clearly depicts that Obama has no respect for America with the flag in the fireplace and the terrorist outfits, but it shows he supports Osama bin Laden with the former and the portrait of the once most sought after man in the world. It also emphasizes the African-American features of the two with the hair and blown up heads. Once again, the only piece I actually found funny.

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Gunner Harrison
1/7/2013 09:25:53 am

I agree with you on te facebook comment Mason. People need to make friends without the aid of the internet.

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Samir Shah
1/7/2013 08:29:38 am

The use of satire is present in all three of the pieces. For example, in the article, “ Neighborhood Flocks To Coffee Shop Bulletin Board To Read About Fun Upcoming Events” the author exaggerates the need for people to always be caught up with the news. He uses quotations and situations of people to show there reasons for always checking the news, and explained then in a silly manner. He expresses all of the people’s actions as stupid reasons for constantly checking the news. Another piece that shows a form of silly satire is the video, “What is Facebook For?” where a man expresses his beliefs about Facebook. In this piece the writer makes out all people who use Facebook to be this kind of a person, one who doesn’t really have many friends, and one who isn’t active. An example of this is shown by the characteristics of the picture shown. For example, the man speeking is in pajamas and is in a dark room, with only the light of a computer to brighten the view. This piece shows the satire as making fun of facebook users, calling all of them people like the man in the video. The last piece of satire is one of Mr. and Mrs. Obama. This shows one dressed as a man from the Middle-East and the other as a military man. They try to show the two as people who support terrorism because of the American flag burning, and the fact that they have Osama Bin Laden hanging above the fire place. Also they show the two fist bumping, one of the things the Obamas do when they accomplish something.

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Samir Shah
1/7/2013 08:36:06 am

don't read this i forgot to add something.

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1/7/2013 08:32:33 am

Many forms of satire as present in all three pieces. Caricature was the form of satire most evident in the first piece. The Onion bashed the way Americans view the news, however they made it humorous. The article made it seem like Americans need to know the news as soon as it comes out, and that it is all they ever talk about. Whether its baseball tickets or books signing, The Onion uses a humorous tone to mock the average American's view of the news. I found this article very interesting, as it made me think about my very own view of the news.

Somegreybloke's video "What Facebook Is For," satirizes what people use Facebook for, in comparison to what Facebook is really for. The teal looking man in the video acts as the classic Facebook user who adds people he doesn't know, people who he'll never know, and attractive woman. He also acts as a regular user, who will just sit and browse through pictures all day. There are many techniques in this video, such as parody, because the teal man represents the common Facebook user, and tone, because the serious tone makes the video seem more "real". Personally, I thought this video was somewhat funny, mainly because it did accurately represent Facebook users.

The New Yorker really went Un-American with this form of satire. This picture shows President Obama and the First Lady abandoning the country once he got in power. The picture shows the American Flag in the fire, President Obama dressed in terrorist clothing, and a terrorist picture on the wall. In this picture, it is obvious that President Obama is being satirized. He's being shown as a traitor to the country, and smiling about it. The artist uses Burlesque in this piece, because he turns a serious issue such as our President, into a no-good traitor. I also think sarcasm is used in this piece, because the irony of our President being a terrorist seems to be quite insulting. As a fellow and dedicated American, I took offense to this piece. I realize that the artist was trying to use sarcasm, but I don't feel like the President of the United States of America would ever betray this awesome country.

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Jeremy M. Barker
1/7/2013 08:32:57 am

The first article is definitely adding on the the excitement of people wanting to hear the news, especially from some random bulletin board. In our modern society people rarely really pay attention to news, at least like it effects them. One thing about the bulletin board is that is shows things that are effecting people locally, while the more commonly used media of phones, computers, television are more broad and probably don't effect the reader in a personal way at all. Not to mention people just don't look at bulletin boards that much. The Facebook one is basically exaggerating what people actually do. Obviously, you probably know about Facebook, and one thing people always do is accept random, strange, and unnecessary friend request, or send them. The person in the video is basically a no-life who friends anybody and that's just what people do, they friend anybody from old friends, actual friends, friends of friends, and random strangers just because they can, and take hours going through useless information. The last one, the cover for the magazine is simply mocking our current president when he was first elected. Obama is dressed to be what people accused him of for his religion or ethnicity, and his wife is a terrorist. Basically the one who designed this disagrees with Obama and decided to show it through art. They must think the president, and his wife, are unamerican from the burning flag and picture above the fireplace. They creator believed Obama was actually out to destroy the country or is simply bad for it. Also, they're in the White House only to make things worse by showing that they have power, not that that's an exaggeration, being the president, but a terrorist leader would be bad news.

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Jeff Lueders
1/7/2013 09:45:55 am

Referring to the article on The Onion, I thought it focused more on useless media that people buy into like morning shows or things like Entertainment Tonight that only focus on Lindsey Lohan's latest blunder or the newest dirt on other celebrities. However, I agree with what you say about the other two topics, though I didn't realize the person holding the gun in the Obama picture was his wife, or even female for that matter. I guess I should look closer at those pictures.

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Jeff Lueders
1/7/2013 09:53:43 am

Referring to the article from The Onion, I felt like it better represented the satire behind useless new casts that people buy into such as morning shows and things like Entertainment Tonight. However, I agree with you when it comes to the other two topics, though I didn't realize that the other person in the picture was Obama's wife. I honestly thought it just some other male who was a terrorist; I guess I should look at those pictures a bit closer.

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Samir Shah
1/7/2013 08:36:17 am

The use of satire is present in all three of the pieces. For example, in the article, “ Neighborhood Flocks To Coffee Shop Bulletin Board To Read About Fun Upcoming Events” the author exaggerates the need for people to always be caught up with the news. He uses quotations and situations of people to show their reasons for always checking the news, and explained then in a silly manner. He expresses all of the people’s actions as stupid reasons for constantly checking the news. I like how he used hyperboles to really emphases how much the people actually pouched for there news. Another piece that shows a form of silly satire is the video, “What is Facebook For?” where a man expresses his beliefs about Facebook. In this piece the writer makes out all people who use Facebook to be this kind of a person, one who doesn’t really have many friends, and one who isn’t active. An example of this is shown by the characteristics of the picture shown. For example, the man speaking is in pajamas and is in a dark room, with only the light of a computer to brighten the view. This piece shows the satire as making fun of facebook users, calling all of them people like the man in the video. I found this one very funny because at the beginning he said e didn’t have many friends until face book, and how he didn’t even know half of his friends. The last piece of satire is one of Mr. and Mrs. Obama. This shows one dressed as a man from the Middle East and the other as a military man. They try to show the two as people who support terrorism because of the American flag burning, and the fact that they have Osama Bin Laden hanging above the fireplace. Also they show the two fist bumping, one of the things the Obama’s do when they accomplish something. What I like in this one is how the author incorporates many of the aspects of Americans views of the Middle East on Obama. Also how the fist bump is a trade mark, and the author mocks it.

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Ravi Shah
1/7/2013 08:39:00 am

The article from "The Onion" is a satire towards the idea of news outlets such as bulletin boards or newspapers that can have good information about the things happening in an area, but people generally do not look for them. It also uses irony in that people are now content to stay at home and do nothing but watch TV or play video games or spend hours at a time on the internet, while the people in this town are more focused on going out and doing things. This is ironic towards the sense of laziness that surrounds the US presently. The video, "What Facebook Is For" is a satire about Facebook and other social networking sites. It shows how a person can have very few friends in reality, but have hundreds or thousands of friends on Facebook, and how this gives them a false confidence that is not earned. Also shown is how the person may organize the people and basically stalk some of them and waste hours doing it, while they will never actually meet these people. The image is an exaggeration of Barack and Michelle Obama. It not only shows there features in a caricature type image, it also shows some of the extreme rumors that were, and still are, surrounding their identities. These can be seen in the guns on Michelle Obama, and in the middle eastern garb that Barack Obama is shown wearing, as well as the image of Bin Laden above a fireplace inside of which is a burning US flag. All of these examples of satire and irony are quite well done, and they are easily understood and often interpreted similarly. They also mostly use sarcasm, as that is the easiest way to perform satire, but sometimes, like in the image, hyperbole is used as well.

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Colby Clark
1/7/2013 08:43:37 am

In this first article taken from The Onion, the writer is satirizing the thirst Americans have for gossip and relatively unimportant news. No one actually flocks to bulletin boards are not generally hubs of activity. However this setting presented a good outlet to satirize how Americans thirst for all sorts of information even if it is unimportant or irrelevant. It also provides a humorous example of how available information is in the modern world and how much more transparent social media has made us. The video satirized the importance placed on social media status, in this case Facebook. By describing it as a game to collect friends it demonstrates how many people don't care if they have to know a person to friend them. Specific emphasis was placed on the changing of relationship statuses, shows the odd social interactions that have come about because of social media. I thought it was pretty entertaining, but I have way to much fun collecting friends searching for likes to quit Facebook. The New Yorker depicts President Obama as a terrorist ally and a sneaky adversary of America. This plays on the fears that many Americans had when he was elected. The burning flag, the turban, and the portrait of Osama Bin Laden all add to the satire. I would assume that the cover sparked a lot of outrage, but I bet for sure that it was good for business.

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Caitlin Morgan
1/7/2013 09:33:00 am

I especially enjoy how you stated that social media has made us transparent. This could stand for both The Onion's article and the Facebook video, being that we've grown so attached to both facts that do not matter, and people we do not know.

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Katelyn Tillstrom
1/7/2013 08:59:09 am

When reading the article titled “Neighborhood Flocks To Coffee Shop Bulletin Board To Read About Upcoming Events,” I was able to find the satire almost right away. I immediately thought that small towns were being picked on. The fact that all of those people mainly looked forward to that one day where they could finally see what could possibly be going on around them made me believe that was the joke. It alludes to Black Friday, making it seem that this is that town’s version of that “holiday.” Black Friday is often a big point in the news, so the fact that this was written like a news article makes it even more humorous. I found this article pretty funny. I can definitely picture a bunch of people checking out the boards at Martin’s or Roger’s seeing what’s for sale, or who’s dog is lost. They took something that doesn’t seem out of the ordinary a huge deal. The YouTube video, “What Facebook is For” pokes fun at the “friend” portion of the website. The “grey bloke” calls it a role playing game where the objective is to get as many friends as possible. He then continues to show his friends in their different categories and explain while they’re there. The humor is that he realizes that almost all of his friends are people he went to high school with, placed in their respective category. Then, there’s the girls he would like to meet. The funny part is, none of them are actually his friends, which is how most people use their Facebook accounts: Simply to add people they never really knew. The video creator used this comical animation to show what Facebook really comes across as to the ignorant new user, who probably really has it figured out. I found this especially humorous. I guess no one realizes what game Facebook created on accident, and it’s rather funny to have it brought to our attention. The picture on The New Yorker satirizes the assumptions towards President Obama at the time. The artist use caricature to emphasize those things. One of those assumptions was about is race and the way he was raised. The artist gives him a turban, symbolizing Muslim culture. There is also the painting of Osama Bin Laden above the fireplace. It also shows him fist bumping with Angela Davis, a radical. There is also a burning flag in the fireplace, portraying his supposed hate for the country. Because of the attitude towards President Obama in 2008, this would definitely come across as comical. I didn’t necessarily find it hilarious, but I did understand what point was being made because of the obvious visual clues.

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Rachel Tuller
1/7/2013 09:50:48 am

You know, I didn't think of it like it was Black Friday but once I read what you wrote, I can see exactly why you would think that. Looking back at the article, it does seem a lot like Black Friday. And I do agree that it is a rather funny way to think of facebook as a game. :D

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Gunner Harrison
1/7/2013 09:24:03 am

The first selection is satirizing the use of boards for news. People hardly ever even look at the boards and the article is making fun of that. The author uses the picture to show what the article suggests, and it is a little humorous to think of a crowd waiting to see the board. I found it comical because of how serious e article seemed. The second selection is poking fun at society's use of Facebook. It does this by showing a guy talking about how many friends he has in real life compared to the virtual world. The man is seen bald and with nasty yellow teeth to make the point that anybody can be "popular" using Facebook and is used for the wrong reasons. I like the video because I once had a Facebook, but I deleted it when it was no longer to keep in touch, but rather to see who can keep the most animals alive in Farmville. I completely agree with the satire in the video. The final picture is making fun of Obama's presidency and say he does more harm than good. It uses a picture with exaggerated features, a burning flag, and a picture of Bin Laden hanging on the wall. This is to show that Obama is helping destroy America, similar to terrorists. I don't agree that he is a terrorist as seen in the picture. I thikn they are trying to say he is more bad than good, but i think they could have done it differently. I am not an Obama supporter, but it does anger me to see people call the man the people chose to lead us a terrorist.

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Alex Forsythe
1/7/2013 10:03:03 am

That's interesting how you looked at the first piece, and I think you're right. Society constantly relies on the tv or internet to inform us on what is going on nowadays. I like your thinking!

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Caitlin Morgan
1/7/2013 09:25:56 am

One could assume that the first article, posted on The Onion, uses satire to poke fun at the constant societal obsession with wanting to “be in the know,” and the pathetic mercy we are at to the press because of it. No matter how ridiculous the information is the natural human response is to jab a close ear in and absorb as much as possible. Filling up on mundane facts that perhaps another has not learned of yet makes us feel entitled. But when we no longer care what they print, all of the power is shifted. We have become the press’ lab rats, scrambling around newsstands begging for whatever piece of spoiled cheese they decide to throw at us the next day, and this naïve submission makes us, as knowledge-hungry patrons, the perfect targets for satire. Personally I enjoyed this piece. It’s about time somebody pointed out this societal flaw.

The YouTube video was rather spot on, and I agree with each and every implied message. Especially accurate was the character’s description of the website as an “online role-playing game.” Facebook is no longer an environment to connect and communicate with friends, but a haven for the shallow where they can attempt to build self esteem through a virtually anonymous interface. People stack up the numbers on their profile to appear, and maybe even feel a little more “cool” even though they hardly know, or have maybe even never met the majority of names on their list. “Friend Requests” are barely ever viewed and often times just sent and accepted for the pure and sad case of stalking.

While the cartoon did not bluntly write the message down as an article could, the sardonic idea of the picture made the artist’s concept quite potent. In the first few months of Obama’s presidency, there were many people who made the bold accusation that because of his supposed religious beliefs and family history he could possibly be a terrorist affiliate of Al Qaeda. Through the attire that he and his wife are shown wearing, the picture above their mantle, and the burning American flag, it is suggested that his election was all a ploy to defeat America from the inside, as an Afghani extremist. Clearly our president is none of the above, and this caricature illustrates the idiocy in such claims that were made in 2008.

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David Tarnowski
1/7/2013 10:11:39 am

About your first piece: I think that you did a wonderful job analyzing it from that aspect. Consider the making fun of small towns also. I don't know. Just a suggestion.

Second Piece: Again a really good analysis. I totally forgot to mention that "role-playing game" portion in my analysis. That's unfortunate because I think that that's an important piece of it.

Third Piece: Again another outstanding analysis. I really liked how you tied in what was actually happening at that time in real life and tying it into your analysis.

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Courtney Bennett
1/7/2013 12:26:16 pm

I really love your analysis of the article on The Onion. I didn't think that deeply about it at all, but I can definitely see where you're coming from. I also really liked your analogy with the rats, because it's so true, especially when we don't no longer care what kind of news we're getting as long as we're getting news.

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Jeff Lueders
1/7/2013 09:27:34 am

In the first article posted by The Onion, it uses satire to exaggerate how Americans react to social media and other types of news. It does this by showing a town that is obsessed with a bulletin board located inside a small coffee shop. Specific examples are how some of the citizens take notice of garage sales or small things like music lessons and baseball tickets being for sale. This satire seems to focus on news sources such as Inside Edition, Entertainment Tonight, and Access Hollywood; even morning shows like the Today Show with Kathy Lee Gifford and Hoda Kotb. It shows how sources like these concentrate on things that have no value to society, yet Americans still watch it and even crave to get more of it. I found this to be an interesting article, but not as funny as I had hoped.

In the YouTube video, Facebook is definitely being satirized. The video does this by giving an example of a person who, in general, has no life outside of the virtual world. This character further disowns Facebook by calling it a game, by adding potentially bad people like Dane Geld (note under information it puts "who's asking?"), by saying that most of the people he's friends with on Facebook he doesn't even know, and by showing how he has a section reserved for attractive women. I found this video to be very funny because parts of it are actually true, or at least to an extent.

Then on the final piece, the New Yorker vandalizes the way President Obama handles foreign relations. They effectively do this by showing the president shaking hands with an armed African man and by making the two men disproportionate to their surroundings. They also add a picture of Osama bin Laden being displayed in the white house and an American flag being burned within the fireplace. This represents how the illustrator feels betrayed by Obama for being friends with opposing figures to most Americans. The artist even goes as far to show how President Obama is Muslim by giving him a turban and sandals. I found this piece to be amusing, yet unfair to go as far as it did by showing Obama supporting terrorist groups.

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Jared Wendland
1/7/2013 11:01:27 am

Interesting points Jeff I feel we shared similar points especially on the third item. The picture did seem unfair to the president but the artist was successful in demonizing the president.

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Owen Carow
1/7/2013 01:09:45 pm

Hahahahaha, Jeff, I think the "armed African man" is supposed to be Michelle Obama.

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Rachel Tuller
1/7/2013 09:29:00 am

In the first article, I feel like they are mocking Americans for the way that they love to find out useless knowledge while doing it in a completely serious tone. Americans spend a lot of time on websites like Twitter and Facebook and it is because of this that Americans spend time looking at useless information. The article on The Onion also makes a joke about how people spend a lot of time just finding out about information. In the article, they make the people just waiting to find out information stand outside for hours while in real life, many people spend those hours online reading different posts about life and what's going. In the YouTube video, they use humor to poke fun at those who have so many friends on Facebook that aren't from real life. I found it kinda amusing how they tease people for looking through pictures on other people's profiles when they are board. The picture has a very ironic tone to it since it is covering Obama and making him seem like he likes terrorists since he has a picture of Osama Bin Laden on the wall and is dressed up like someone from the Middle East. Overall, all three of these pieces show good satire and are very entertaining to read.

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Danielle Keenan
1/7/2013 09:33:07 am

In the article “the Onion” the need to know everything attitude of people is what’s being satirized. The writer exaggerates by having people be excited over little things like a phone number or a book signing. The tone is portrayed as serious by as you get further in you realize that there is a lot of verbal irony and sarcasm used. I thought it was funny and described most American very well with the use of satire. The YouTube video is satirizing people’s obsession with Facebook. He calls it a “multiplayer game” because most people use it just to get more friends or just play games. Also people use it so much that they categorize friends and even have friends that they have never met. I agree with the videos message of people being way too obsessed with Facebook. The photo being satirized is of president Obama and his wife Michelle. The artist made Obama’s head big to show his big ego and placed a turban on his head because people thought because of his father and step father were Muslim that he was raised that way. Michelle is dressed as a terrorist and the picture of Osman bin laden is to show that maybe Obama isn’t the person who the people thought they elected. The last picture I don’t agree with, there are some things that I don’t agree with that Obama does but I think it was disrespectful but whoever drew it had the write of freedom of press and to express their opinion.

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Evan Kiel
1/7/2013 10:44:52 am

I like the the part about the big ego i didn't even think of that, but it truly was disrespectful and there are somethings that just shouldn't be done

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Taylor Dale
1/7/2013 09:45:55 am

The article from The Onion satirizes the fact that people will wait hours in lines for the newest product. Or they will wait hours in lines for a sale or sales, such as Black Friday. The author uses several techniques to build satire. The article uses a news report style, quoting participants of the billboard madness. There are also several exaggerations that build up the point. For example, the story of the women who got trampled and had to go to the hospital, which relates to real stories of people getting trampled in crowds of people during a big sale. I definitely would not be able to tell that this article was satire if I did not know it came from The Onion. I also was not sure at first what was satirized, but I could tell it was mocking something.

The YouTube video satirizes Facebook. The satire is built by the monotone person. It makes him seem like he has no personality. It also makes fun of the point of Facebook. By comparing it to an online role play game. It also satirizes people who add other people they do not even know, by talking about the groups of friends the character has. Personally I thought this was easier to tell that it was satire. I also had to laugh at how true it is. I always hear about people that have friends on Facebook that they do not even know.

The image mocks the President and his background. It mocks him by dressing him like a Muslim. It also shows him and his wife doing a fist bump. It shows the President and his wife in the oval office and the American Flag being burned in the fire. According to the date the creator of the picture had to be a McCain supporter satirizing what it would be like if Obama took office. I was not quite sure what it is satirizing, but I think I got a pretty good guess.

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Richard Harris
1/7/2013 09:59:24 am

In The Onion's article, what's being satirized is the importance of the news in someone's life. This is shown by how the people in article claim how ignorant they are about the events and other hings occurring where they live. I felt this article also satirized the hype/over excitement people have when they are shopping for during the holiday season. This shown in the article when people are described waiting in line and camping besides the business to get their peak at the bulletin board. I believe it is also shown when the lady being trampled is mentioned. Other than that, I didn't think the article was anything amazing.

In the Youtube video about Facebook, it satirizes certain people who spend their time on Facebook. The video does this by comparing Facebook to an MMO game where the people try to make as many "friends" as possible, the majority of which these Facebook users never have or probably never will meet. This is quite truthful due to the fact that there so many people with several hundred friends. I liked the video because it shows how it is almost pointless to use Facebook if all you are doing is accepting friend requests from unknown people.

The cover of The New Yorker satirizes Obama as being a terrorist in charge of the nation. This is shown by the American flag burning in the fireplace and a picture of Bin Laden on the wall. I don't like Obama but I felt this may be going a little too far and the artist has a strong dislike for our president.

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Michael Gorton
1/7/2013 10:36:55 am

I agree with you about the cover picture of the magazine. Even though Obama is not the best president to hold office, it is over-doing it by portraying him as a terrorist.

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Kathleen Risk
1/7/2013 11:53:02 am

I don't think it was calling the President a terrorist leader for two reasons. First, I would guess the New Yorker is a rather liberal magazine and would support Obama. Second, this cover was published in July of 2008, before Obama ever became President, so how could they criticize him as a leader?

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Owen Carow
1/7/2013 01:11:25 pm

I agree, there is no way the New Yorker is going to go against Obama. Remember everyone, it's *satire*.

Alex Forsythe
1/7/2013 10:00:53 am

The first article is trying to show how social networking controls our lives. Friends on Facebook now post literally everything they do in their everyday live's, and it's so pointless. Sure it's nice to keep in touch with family members we don't see often, or old friends, but it's not important to know what they eat for breakfast. The author explains that everyone has it and they can't wait to see what's being posted on the board, which would mimic the social networking site. I thought the article was pretty funny and a very accurate depiction of how our society reacts to the social networking site. Facebook is being saturized in this YouTube video. The video shows an odd looking man with yellow teeth and a robe to show how anyone can use Facebook and also can be dangerous. Later in the video it shows his lists of girls that he's friends with, and sometimes he talks to them for fun. He could be lying to them and saying he's a young teen just like her. This would be an example of a sex offender. I thought this video was humerous because of the way he was dressed, but also scary because there are tons of sex offenders on social networking sites. The American government and how Obama runs the country is being mocked in the last piece. The picture shows a burning American flag in the fireplace which I think anyone would notice right away. There is also a picture of Osama Bin Laden hanging above the fireplace which is also hard to miss. The piece is also mocking how the Obama's fist pound whenever something good happens. Both of them are dressed in Al Queda clothes, so using the fist pound might be trying to show the terrorists trying to strike again on the United States, and ultimately being successful. I thought this picture was pretty embarrassing to our country as a whole. Even though Obama doesn't do the greatest job, he's still our president and is doing all he possibly can to keep us safe.

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Caitlin Morgan
1/7/2013 10:06:36 am

I would have never made the connection between Facebook and "The Board" but I believe you are spot on. It is presented in a highly similar sense to that of the social network "Wall" or "Newsfeed."

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1/7/2013 10:23:09 am

The onion article did remind me of the "Wall" in Facebook. The youtube video was more creepy than I initially thought. I did not make the connection that the guy was inappropriately friending young girls. The message was more truthful since that is a real risk of being online when people put up pictures for strangers to gawk at.

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David Tarnowski
1/7/2013 10:05:27 am

1. I think that the first example of satire from the Onion makes fun of several things. First, it makes fun of small towns. I think that this is done with the phrases such as "nearby minor league club", "charity 5k fun run", "'I thought for sure I’d made my last butternut-squash soup of the year, but clearly I was mistaken."' These are examples of stupid things that small town people find enjoyable and important. They are then put on a bulletin board that these small town citizens cannot wait to get an eye on. On another level, like mentioned in almost all the other posts, it is also a satire of the obsession with getting news. People in this small town camp overnight so that they can be first in line to get a glimpse at the bulletin board. The article even mentions that police had to restrain the crowds one time. Like Katelyn Tilstrom states it can be compared with an event like Black Friday. I think that the author of this article does a wonderful job in portraying his satire in a funny and effective way.

2. The Youtube video is obviously a satire of Facebook. The very appearance of the man speaking is that a person with no life. He is kind of grotesque. His skin is grey, his teeth are yellow, he is bald, and he has bags under his eyes. This gives the impression that he spends most of his time in front of a computer. This is satirical because many people say that Facebook causes people to become addicted to it, and they spend huge amounts of time checking their profiles.The second satirical, yet sadly true, part of the video is the description of the man's friend groups. the groups he describe are on an exagerated level the same sort of friend groups that many people have on their Facebook profiles.I think that Facebook is a total waste of time, so this video rings true to me. I totally agree with the satire and I think that it was well portrayed.

3. The cover of the New Yorker provides several examples of satire. The first is the fact that Obama is portrayed in Islamic/ Middle Eastern garb. This is a satire of the fact that some people accuse him of being a terrorist because of his attempts at compromise with Middle Eastern nations. Along with this, this idea is supported by the picture of the terrorist above the fireplace and the American flag burning in the fireplace. The artist also choose to portray both Michelle and Barack with caricaturish features. This makes them look stupid. The artist also makes fun of the "thing" that Michelle and Barack do. (Fist bump) All in all I think that this was meant to be a negative satire towards Obama. In this light, I think that the artist was very effective in portraying their message.

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1/7/2013 10:12:02 am

The first of the three examples mocks how people are consumed with being up to date with the latest events. The article emphasizes people's reactions and how they make a big deal out of useless and unimportant information. They are eager for the newest post and revolve around the bulletin. The people appear to be pathetic, wasting their time. The article relates to our society which is not very centered on community. Also, in reality everyone is busy and involved with their own lives, unlike the people in the article who had nothing better to do than gather around meaningless posts. This example was funny especially when one person was like, "I wonder which dogs will be missing this week." Nobody would care. The second example on Facebook was a message on how ridiculous Facebook is. The guy does not personally know anyone yet friends them. The most humor, I thought, was in his voice. It lacked emotion. That Facebook is emotionless may be another message. The last example on the caricature of Obama and Michelle Obama showed them in an unflattering light, with Obama as a Muslim terrorist and Michelle going along with it. It may be trying to emphasize how Obama and Michelle are not exhibiting what America stands for and that terrorism was not being handled with the needed firmness that is in the best interest of the country. Bin Laden's picture in the cartoon serves as a reminder that terrorism is a big threat, which the president had to acknowledge. It was a shocking cartoon and offensive, especially considering that Obama has made commendable actions against terrorists, like ordering Bin Laden's assassination. Overall, the first example was kind of subtle while the last two were more up front and obviously mocking.

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Michael Gorton
1/7/2013 10:33:11 am

The article from the onion was very attention grabbing to me. It is easily made clear after the first few paragraphs that the idea of Americans frantically trying to find out what the "next best thing" is available to buy is reinforced by cunning use of satire. By using the bulletin board that lists everyday items and events that the townspeople somehow find interesting as a primary example, the article captures this trait of American shoppers in the spotlight through the use of a humorous story. I found the article amusing enough to make me laugh a few times, mainly because the idea of all of those people acting like it's Black Friday for a bulletin board was insane.

As for the Youtube video, it is obvious that people who spend a lot of time on Facebook are being ridiculed. When the guy speaking mentions "the game" I about busted a gut! The sad thing is that there are people who deffinitely consider sites such as Facebook to be of that sort considering they are on the site 24-7. Also, the part about the "attractive women section" was embarassing. I mean honestly, could you get any more desperate? This being said, I found this video the funniest out of the three examples.

Finally, there was the picture of President Obama portrayed as a supporter of terrorism. The presence of serious satire is very apparent as there is a burning American flag in the backdrop, the First Lady is also a terrorist, and there is a picture of Osama Bin Laden on the wall. I definitely see why this picture was so controvercial as I too found the image to be uncomfortable, and considering all of the hype that took place over the Presidents birth certificate.

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1/7/2013 10:34:00 am

I think the video was showing just how stupid online lives can be. There is a huge push on Facebook to have as many "Friends" as possible and many of us have many friends that we have never nor will ever meet. This seems fine to many of us but the creator of the video is asking what is the point? Relationships are hard enough when you know people and when you add 400 other "Friends" into the mix it becomes daunting. The article about the coffee shop was satirizing the huge desire for knowledge about what is going on in politics. The author shows how people wait for so long and go threw many crazy hoops to find information that largely does not effect us at all. My favorite part was how a woman knew a friend who knows a friend who knows the guy who puts up the list and that is how she gets to see the board so early. It just shows how crazy we are some times. The cover of The New Yorker was just a humorous/slightly aggressive drawing of Obama and his wife. Obviously showing how radical republicans think he is a terrorist and that he and his wife have staged the perfect cou and seized the White House. It is offensive but there are many worse caricatures of him and other leaders. It is only famous because it was on the cover of a major magazine.

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Evan Kiel
1/7/2013 10:38:04 am

In the article on "The Onion" the need for society to know everything about everything is what's portrayed with satire. It is a serious story about this extremely outrageous event that very likely didn't happen. This shows the brutality of our in its need for information. We will do anything to get it. It uses exaggeration to present its point but it is still quite clear in society that this kind of stuff happens despite us not wanting to believe that we do. The video about Facebook was quite interesting, it is actually just a very accurate representation of what Facebook is but uses the creepy character to make it funny and also present the whole thing as more of a game than a communication device. The whole people just trying to get more friends happens a lot, and it has become just a site full of people posting about nothing important at all. It is better for stalking than anything else like is clearly shone in the video. The picture with the Obama's is questionable to say the least. I understand why it was so controversial, it isn't very true but anyway it is using exaggerated features of the people and background to show that they are basically with the terrorist in trying to fight America. The flag burning in the fireplace, the picture hanging above that all show "who they support" which is very much satire because i very much doubt this is even remotely true

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Leland Dunwoodie
1/7/2013 10:51:55 am

I like how you pointed out that Facebook was portrayed as more of a game and that it's just a site full of pointless crap to be used for cyber-stalking. I agree. I like the voice put into this piece...this is definitely a piece by Evan Kiel. I could almost hear you talking in my head while I was reading it. Almost.

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Jared Wendland
1/7/2013 10:46:17 am

In the first article the Onion takes on a serious tone reporting about the excitement surrounding a weekly bulletin. The satirical part about this is that no one reads these things and for good reason. They never have anything majorly important. The Onion plays on this by quoting people’s exuberant relations. The paper also creates a picture of people pushing and clawing to get lackluster news the antithesis of what bulletin boards are in reality. I found this one quite humorous it that it reversed everything playing on the topic. The second piece of satire I found funny in that it points out the flaws of Facebook. First of the man in the video introduces the website as a role playing game where you collect “friends” as a goal. This point is satirical as it makes fun of the fact that many people add people that aren’t really friends, just to have a lot of friends. Another point made fun of is how a lot of people tend to stalk others on the website. Another thing I noticed was the appearance and behavior of the man. He can’t seem to have his eyes away from the screamed for more than five seconds, not to mention he doesn’t look as if he seems to have seen sunlight in days. These characteristics seem to match those of people that take Facebook too far the video makes fun of those people. As for the final item this picture of Mr. Obama and his wife. The picture satirizes the two through different physical depiction making them out to be terrorists. The picture shows an American flag beginning burned. I feel that all together this picture is out to demonize the two, saying how they are not what is best for the country. The picture does what its purpose was and voices the artists view.

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Leland Dunwoodie
1/7/2013 10:46:51 am

Props to Mrs. Ziegler for having the tech savvy to hyperlink the article and the three satirical pieces.

The first article satirizes modern society’s need-to-know attitude. The article makes this thirst for trivial knowledge seem foolish by using a variety of tactics. One thing the article does is emphasize the importance of “the Board” by showing people that think “the Board” is tremendously important and showing the unbelievable length of the line to see “the Board.” Another tactic the article uses is to trivialize the contents of “the Board.” By making the contents of the board silly and un-important, the article makes it seem like the public is crazy for making such a big deal out of “the Board.” The article does an ample job of furthering its argument against modern society’s thirst for trivial knowledge but fails to promote a solution to society’s need-to-know attitude.

The YouTube video satirizes people that spend ungodly amounts of time on Facebook. The video promotes the idea that these people have no life away from their computer screen. The video does this by showing that people that spend too much time on Facebook don’t have any real friends and spend their evenings cyber-stalking women that they don’t physically know. The video also furthers its argument by showing that Facebook-obsessers are physically unattractive; the gray blob in the video has yellow teeth, bad posture, and a flabby physique. The video adequately shows that social media dwellers have no physical life but could prove its point better by contrasting the monotony of the gray blob’s life online with the excitement of someone’s life that lives life in the real world.

The cover of the New Yorker satirizes the Obama’s way of doing things and promotes the idea that President Obama supports terrorists. The cover does this by decorating the Oval Office scene with appalling material: a picture of Osama bin Laden on the wall, an American flag in the fireplace, an eagle under the President’s foot and a turban on his head, a gun over the First Lady’s shoulder, and the Obamas doing their signature fist-bump. These satirical nuisances serve their purpose of furthering the cover’s argument. However, the designer of this cover needs to be punched in the face repeatedly. While President Obama can’t fix our nation’s fiscal problems, (I’ll save that argument for a journal) he is not a terrorist and it is wrong to challenge a well-meaning person’s way of life.

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Darcy Copeland
1/7/2013 11:46:11 am

I love your approach on the three pieces, especially the first article. I was thinking the same thing about the Facebook video! I agree with you completely.

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Samuel L. Johnson
1/7/2013 11:54:31 am

Sure, but about that lady-stalking on facebook, I think that alot of the humor that comes from his decleration of seeking arousal from creeping on attractive women stems not only from the fact that he doesnt know them, but more from the fact that he is unatractive. The mesage becomes sadder this way but that's what makes us laugh, it's true and we are finally givin an apropriate outlet to express our emotions towards this sad truth.

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Nicole Z
1/15/2013 12:49:32 am

Thanks, Leland!

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Lauren Clem
1/7/2013 11:18:36 am

In the article, the satire exists because many people crave the drama and gossip of new things that happen in the world, but normally information is not found on a bulletin board. To build the satire, the author of the article uses examples of people who are lined up early and are excited to read the daily postings whether they are really all that important or not.
The video is set with a serious tone, but it humorous because of the way the character explains Facebook as if it was foreign to its viewers. Even though the commonly used site is described as a game with many different things you can do, it is truthful because of the way that many people still continue to use it to become friends with people online.
The cover, the important images of the flag on fire, Obama’s large head, and his odd wardrobe are a few of the elements that are being satirized. By having the artist pick and choose which elements he wanted to exaggerate he can control the tone of the image set on to the viewer.
Out of all three, the video was easy to pick up on because of the sarcastic tone and diction used to describe the site, which made it very easy to enjoy. The article also had its share of humor, along with the truthful side of how many people react to the smallest occasions. However, the image had a very strong message that could be picked up differently depending on what the viewer saw and how they interpreted it as a whole.

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Kelsey Berndt
1/7/2013 11:21:25 am

In the Onion's article, our society's need to be in the know is being satirized. The board itself is being satirized as well, because no one really reads those. The writer uses exaggeration and a mocking, serious tone to build the satire. With the quotes and descriptions given, the article parodies an actual article perfectly. I thought that this was really humorous, and it makes me want to read the Onion very often.
In the Youtube video, Facebook users and the usefulness of Facebook are being satirized. Caricature and exaggeration are both used to build the video's satire. His description of Facebook being a game with the objective of collecting friends and his admission of not seeing many people offline go to show the uselessness of social networking. However, his gray, sun-deprived skin and robe show him to be a couch potato, the epitome of a Facebook user. While the video is funny, I thought the Onion article was more entertaining.
The New Yorker illustration satirizes Obama and his care for America. The artist uses the tools of extremes and caricature to build the satire in his drawing. The American flag in fireplace and the painting of Osama Bin Laden above the mantle show Obama as a terrorist. His wife is also portrayed like a terrorist, dressed in terrorist clothes. Obama's head being drawn large is to imply cockiness. This was my least favorite of the three satirical selections, I didn't find it as funny as the Onion article or the Youtube video, but that's probably because I don't particularly care for politics.

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Kasey Shoemaker
1/7/2013 11:28:03 am

The first satirical article “The Onion” describes how Americans, in general, need to have the latest information first. If they don’t know what’s going on, right at that moment it’s like they’re lost. You could tell that there was sarcasm used throughout this article to make it satirical. The second, the YouTube video about Facebook, shows a man in a bathrobe with grey skin and bags under his eyes telling people to join Facebook because of how much he enjoys it. This is a caricature because it is one person representing the millions of Facebook users. I found this video creepy because, though not every person with a facebook may spend endless hours there, many do. The cover of "The New Yorker" caused both Obama’s to appear as terrorists. It was illustrated through the cloths they were wearing. Another thing that is illustrated is an American flag burning, showing that it was put there on purpose because Obama wants to destroy America. I found this a little disturbing, though expected.

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Kylie Wermund
1/7/2013 08:57:49 pm

My first reaction to The Onion's article was that it was mocking people's need to have the latest news first too! I'm glad we're on the same page!

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1/7/2013 11:35:49 am

1) At first, I couldn't believe there was a town that actually did this. Then I remembered it was satire! Woo! I went with the straight up thinking: they're making fun of bulletin boards and how useless and dull the information that is on them are. The Onion uses extreme exaggeration and a bit of sarcasm to make fun of the use of bulletin boards. I thought this article was very funny and extremely wacky.

2) This YouTube video is making fun of Facebook users and their so called "friends" on the Internet. By labeling the cyber-friends into groups such as <I've seen the physically a few times>, it's making fun of our generation today and our way of replacing face to face communication with online chatting. There is plenty of sarcasm and irony used to help portray this image of online "friendships" by using Facebook stalking. The use of the weird alien dude also helps because he now thinks he has tons of friends, but will probably never talk or see many of them. This video was very strange but entertaining for me, and completely accurate.

3) I feel like this cover is showin that President Obama and his wife support the war, Al Queda, and terrorism, and that Obama is trying to destroy American. They use visual images such as the gun, the portrait, the turban on Obama's head, and the burning of the American flag to support their satirist claim. Also, the couple's fist bump implies that they were trying and are succeeding in destroying America. I really don't like this article because it makes me uncomfortable, and I think it's disrespectful. I don't think it's true or has any truth to it at all.

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Alex Miller
1/7/2013 11:41:32 am

Haha I thought the 1st one was real also! I also liked how Haley mentioned the fist point that I had not noticed before.

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Alex Miller
1/7/2013 11:35:53 am

In the article in "The Onion" the thing being satirized is our societies need to know everything that is going on around them, and the competition there is to know the information first plays a role in the article as well. The author achieves this by using rhetorical devices such as hyperboles and irony through the article to get the point that Americans want to be the first one to know things, such as the lady tackling people just to see it first. It uses figurative language as well. My reaction to the acticle is that it was actually how Americans act with celebrity news and then new trends that take place in our country. The video satirizes people who stay inside and go on the computer all day. The producer uses caricature by having the character be pal skin, yellow teeth,monotone voice, and quite boring personality that was a little creepy. The video also uses wit about the different groups of friends he has, which is quite funny. My overall reaction to the video is that it was funny and got the point across that Facebook is pointless. The cover of Obama shows burlesque way of showing the Obama's patriotism towards America by the flag in the fire, the terrorist picture above the fireplace, and Mrs. Obama's outfit with guns and camo

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Alex Miller
1/7/2013 11:39:33 am

(cont.)
. Obama's outfit is also resembling the man's outfit in the picture. My reaction towards the cover is that it was a good cover that showed the outlook of what some Americans think Obama is all about.

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Darcy Copeland
1/7/2013 11:41:04 am

The first article is satirizing America’s blatant obsession with the need to know more, more, more about everything and everyone, despite how useless and unimportant the information may be. The author does this by dramatizing the lengths that people go to in order to achieve the newest gossip, to be “in the know”—even going so far as to mention a new mother being trampled—and by writing in a news article format with a very matter-of-fact tone. The article seems to have a lot of a juvenalian satire attributes to it, especially with the line, “‘I wonder what dogs will be missing this week,’ she added.” It was quite dark at times, in my opinion, and my reaction to it was that humorous but got the message across.
The video mocks the need to feel connected to others via a social networking site, which doesn’t really connect us at all. The narrator lives his life in a shell: slouching, blue and unhealthy skin, yellowed teeth, a bored, monotone voice. He claims that facebook gives him something in common with people he never had anything in common with—but why is this necessary? He categorizes his friends into pointless categories of people he never socializes with, which makes the audience question why he’s doing it in the first place. It also mocks the feeling that making “friends” on the website is a competition, as it sometimes seems it is—who has more friends, more likes? The author does this early on when describing the website as a “massively multiplayer online role-playing game, in which the objective is to obtain ‘friends.’” This plants the idea that gaining these meaningless “friends” is crucial to the facebook experience and is a goal to strive for. It really shows how we bring the battle of popularity from our lives to the internet. The article was very straightforward and more caricature than anything else, and I found it humorous.
The painting presented a mocking bias towards Barack Obama, and clearly shows that the artist has strong opinions against him. Due to the date of the piece, I can assume that the artist was trying to show what would become of the United States if he came into office. The turban on Obama’s head, the portrait of Osama Bin Laden, the burning American flag, and Michelle’s attire and weapon(s) are the more obvious shows of disdain; however, what I find most interesting is the way Obama is shaped in the work: a large head, small body, and his head is angled so that you can’t see him all the way, as though to make him seem that he’s scheming something sinister. His foot is positioned in such a way that it is separating the eagle’s head on the rug from the rest of its body, which also intrigued me. Michelle and Barack Obama are also fist bumping, emphasizing their partnership in their wicked scheme to destroy America, as portrayed through the artist’s eyes. All in all, the artist is blatantly showing that he or she believes the country will fall to turmoil and terrorism under the Obama administration. My reaction to the piece was that was very dramatic and boldly stated—someone would have to have a very strong opinion to make such bold accusations.

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Samuel L. Johnson
1/7/2013 11:44:22 am

1. The Onion’s article is drowning in satire. It knows that no one every really cares about whatever is on bulletins whether it’s in a coffee shop or in your church, and The Onion blatantly brings attention to it by creating an extreme: that people line up around the building to take a gander at the news and the sales and the amateur guitar lessons. More to the point this information is more or less useless to the general population. This also becomes a satire on public media. How we can’t wait to be informed and fed anything that we think is important. The problem that The Onion brings to light is that the news and information that we ask for is similar to the kind of useless junk that gets spewed across bulletin boards in coffee shops, that what we want is a weekly update on dog snatchers and cooking shows (which sadly isn’t far from the truth). The article also notes how we wait for such informative vomit with a great deal of anticipation, that we show up a full week in advance just to catch a peek of what’s going on. I loved this article, It made me laugh out loud a number of times, and because I don’t allow myself to be exposed to such a degrading form of news (like what we have to choose from on television) it gave me a false sense of self-righteousness and piety.

2. The SomeGreyBloke YouTube post satirizes Facebook, obviously. He sheds light on how in order to win at face booking you need to collect as many friends as humanly possible which is how many people treat it. The hilarity ensues when he gets you to realize, through his satire about how pathetic he is and how he compares it to an online game, that in order to win at this activity, which supposedly encourages social activity, you need to become a social recluse. You need to be unable and uninterested in making real friends and instead making Facebook friends. He also satirizes how creepy Facebook can become, how you can stalk people who you’ve never met, and occasionally take pleasure in their dissatisfaction with their own life because it makes you feel better about yours. I loved this video. It also gave a false sense of self-righteousness and piety because I have long since abandoned my Facebook profile.

3. The last source is satirical through how Obama and the Mrs. are portrayed. They are showed in Israeli clothing with a portrait of Osama Bin Laden over the mantel. This is an exaggeration with the intent of portraying the Obamas as part of Al Qaeda. They also have the American flag in the fireplace. This is also to portray the Obamas as part of Al Qaeda. There really isn’t anything too deep with this. I think it’s cheeky, I like it.

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Jordon Young
1/7/2013 12:20:19 pm

Mr. Samuel L. Jackson--I mean Samuel L. Johnson, is being cheeky a good thing? Are you sure cheeky is the right adjective to use with terrorists? In this case, I would have to agree with you, yes.

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Kathleen Risk
1/7/2013 11:46:14 am

In the article from the Onion, the author is satirizing social media, and media in general. People have an obsession with gaining knowledge about their acquaintances and about famous people, and this is mocked by representing it with rather insignificant news such as lost dogs. The people in the article are shown as flocking to the coffee shop in hoards and making it a priority, which mocks people who are obsessed with media by showing their obsession is irrational. The article amused me with its truth, because this is something that is quite apparent in our society and we are all guilty of at times. The video satirized the friends people have on facebook. The main thing it made fun of was the fact that people don’t actually know a lot of their “friends” on facebook, or aren’t friends with them in real life. This was achieved by showing the groups the guy separated friends into, with the few people he physically saw, to old friends. This video made me laugh because while exaggerated, people do this on facebook. One thing that I especially enjoyed was when he talked about people from the past, because I know a lot of people from older generations like my parents who add old high school or college friends who they weren’t even friends with. Last but not least was the picture. I don’t think that The New Yorker was mocking Obama himself, but rather people’s opinions and stereotypes of him. This cover came out during the 2008 presidential election before he was ever elected, and many people thought he was a terrorist because of his Islamic background. This is satirized by the Middle Eastern clothing, the picture of Bin Laden, and the burning of the American flag. I remember some people talking about how Michelle Obama occasionally slipped into the African American accent, and that it was uncivilized. While I disagreed, this is an example of how people stereotyped the future First Lady as sort of black power and a feminist, which the cover also mocks. Michelle Obama is portrayed as having the natural afro and being dressed in an outfit reminiscent of groups like the black panthers. I actually found this magazine cover to be an interesting critique on people’s opinions of the Obama’s, but I do not think it should have been done so blatantly.

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Jordon Young
1/7/2013 12:10:25 pm

The first example, from The Onion, satirizes the fact that people have little to no interest in community bulletin boards, community events, available volunteer work, garage sales, and the way in which people receive their information. It's written in a news report fashion that seems "light and humorous" enough(Horatian), but I have difficulty accepting that saying anything opposite of the truth, no matter how obvious, in a news setting, feels wrong. I'm sure someone is out there reading this and thinking, "Marge, grab the kids! Imma gone get me summa dat der info' mation!" I actually hope no one will believe this article, or any article on this website. But if China––well, let's not talk about China and their bad choice in news sources. I detect a hint of wit and sarcasm in the writer's voice, but I'd say this is a caricature of people, or lack of people who partake in the above activities.
The YouTube video was my favorite. It satirizes Facebook's friend system and the availability of personal information; the video specifically identifies the availability of photographs. It is juvenalian in form, and I suppose it's a parody of people collecting friends(Parody), but it's also taking something that's funny, or made humorous, and making it serious(Burlesque). The MMORPG metaphor made me laugh. I bought a subscription to EVE(a space age MMORPG) for a month two summers ago... I'll never get that month of my life back.
I was actually slightly offended by this cartoon. I understand that the creator's wanted to get peoples' attention––which they did––but I feel that someone holding the Office of the President shouldn't be displayed like that out of respect for the office(It's a juvenalian caricature). The burning American Flag, the picture on the wall, the first lady's assault rifle. That's pretty bitter. I didn't "lol" or even giggle on the inside.

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Austin Latack
1/7/2013 01:39:22 pm

I completely agree on the third one. Even though the artist perceived Obama as an anti-American, even though he paid millions upon millions to lead the nation, what he exaggerated crossed the line, and then some. Completely absurd.

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Courtney Bennett
1/7/2013 12:21:06 pm

In the first article I did not find a deeper meaning beyond what it appears to be: a satire of bulletin boards in small businesses. It seemed to me that the pointlessness of having bulletin boards was exemplified through the excessive and extended use of exaggeration. By describing crowds and lines and a ravenous desire to view the commonplace, unexciting things posted on bulletin boards, light is shed on the fact that hardly anyone pays attention to bulletin boards and certainly no one goes anywhere for the sole purpose of viewing one. The extreme urgency with which people went to view the board demonstrates that in reality, very little people actually care what’s posted there. I thought it was very humorous to see such excitement over mundane listings.
In the youtube video, facebook is being satirized by discussing ridiculous but also true aspects of facebook that many people actually use. Satire is built by the discussion of facebook in a seemingly serious tone while the topics are humorous. I think it’s a good generalization of some peoples’ friend lists. The blunt way that the gray bloke talks about facebook helped make his point more clear.
In the New Yorker cover of Mr. and Mrs. Obama, Obama himself is being satirized. The cover mocks Mr. and Mrs. Obama’s fist pump while exaggerating some of Obama’s features and blowing his views largely out of proportion by illustrating a burning American flag and a framed portrait of Bin Laden in the background. Their clothing is also exaggerated in order to fit the scene, and Michelle is shown with a gun. I think this is pretty extreme and I’m not surprised it sparked a lot of controversy. Making a comparison between the president and terrorism seems a bit over the edge.

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Carley Grau
1/8/2013 08:23:18 pm

I thought the same thing about facebook, that the guy was telling how the friends lists of people are the main point of facebook and how a lot of people arent really friends at all.

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Owen Carow
1/7/2013 01:01:01 pm

The first item, from The Onion, satirizes the obsession many people have with being up to date, and having every morsel of knowledge offered by the media in the age of information. The article describes how a group of Americans goes berserk in pursuit of the most meaningless news. It echoes current events of people being trampled in these meaningless frenzies (like Black Friday/doorbusters) to show how unreasonable these people really are. The satire is in line with people who grow addicted to their chosen form of media, whether TV news, newspapers, or otherwise, and eat up every word, becoming enthralled with things they previously didn't care about ("I thought for sure I’d made my last butternut-squash soup of the year, but clearly I was mistaken”) without once thinking for themselves. Personally I didn't find this one as funny as the other two; it seemed like the joke went on for a few paragraphs too many.
The second one, the Youtube video, is a satire for Facebook and how for many people it's more of a game than actual social interaction. The video makes it clear that almost none of the man's "friends" are actually people he spends time with, but instead more of just numbers in his collection, like online trophies. Most of his friends are just people who had some brief connection with him in the past. The satire, while a bit exaggerated, highlights the fact that many people do use Facebook for these kind of meaningless social interactions, contrasting with actually spending quality time with your friends. this one was the most humorous to me. I'm not the biggest fan or user of Facebook, and I could tell I share my opinions on it with the maker of the video.
The last example is the cover of the New Yorker showing Barack and Michelle Obama as Middle-Easterners, armed in combat gear and a turban, while burning a US flag in the oval office under a painting of Osama bin Laden. The satire here is clearly directed at the claims that Obama is a Muslim, Iraqi, Terrorist, Atheist, or what have you. The absurdity of having a terrorist for a president is clear in the picture, pointing out the weakness of these claims. The exaggerated cartoon demonstrates that the argument is a bit silly. I enjoyed the cartoon; it's a witty way of dismissing what I find to be a very stupid issue.

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Austin Latack
1/7/2013 01:35:36 pm

1. In "Neighborhood Flocks To Coffee Shop Bulletin Board To Read About Fun Upcoming Events," the author generally uses extreme exaggeration, hyperbole, throughout the article. The author takes an usually low-key, quiet activity some do occasionally, and blows it up to make it seem like a bigger deal than it actually is. The author centers "The Board" as the source of the most happiness from the community and makes it seem as this is one of the biggest things that is in their lives. I personally love "The Onion" and have read this article already, but I think the author nailed this satire down in a humorous way that made me laugh out loud at times. I loved how they took a unimportant matter and blew it up to be an essential part of living.

2. Somegreybloke satirizes how most people use Facebook. in his video "What Facebook is For," he discusses how almost every person listed as a "friend" on Facebook is but only the opposite. His monotone voice exemplifies how many users generally feel about Facebook and their 'friends" on it. He tells how it is mainly a source of virtually connected with people who you generally wouldn't associate yourself with socially in the real world, and the more friends you have, the better you are at playing this "game." I have a Facebook account and everything this guy says is extremely relatable to what I think when I do decide to occasionally log on. I have stopped using it as frequently because I do not really need to know what people are doing that I don't care for enough to not find out by asking them in person, just as he shows.

3. Printed during the presidential campaigns, the author satirizes the Obamas by exaggerating their genetics. They take this to the extreme exemplifying Michelle Obama as some sort of African rebel with her sidekick Barrack Obama looking like a member of the Taliban, pridefully praising Osama Bin Laden and burning an American flag. I find this cartoon extremely offensive and believe the author used satire to hurt, rather than get a laugh out. Although I was a John McCain advocate, I still do not believe any American should have the decency to draw our nation's (future) leader burning a flag and praising someone he later led a team to kill.

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Kathleen Janeschek
1/7/2013 02:15:17 pm

The Onion article satirizes not only society's incessant need for information, but its overwhelming desire for all things new and shiny. While the article can be looked at from a "being in the know" perspective, there are several indicators that suggest that it leans more towards the "new, new, new!" angle. Take the descriptions of the lengths people go to in the lines or the violent incidents mentioned; these descriptions would fit perfectly into an article about Black Friday. Even the descriptions of the press are reminiscent of an Apple press conference, as everyone eagerly awaits the next big thing. This article makes its point by describing these events, then making them about as completely mundane as a newsletter bulletin--which according to the author, is just as ridiculous as what really happens. Overall, I found the article to be a bit dry, and not very clear. I didn't laugh or even crack a smile at it, nor did its absurdity amuse me.
The Youtube vidio is an obvious satire of Facebook and how many people use it in ways not for its intended purpose. In particular it pokes fun at how more socially awkward people approach the website. It does this by using having a clearly odd character describe his interactions with the website. This character does not see the website as a place to connect with people, but as a video game where one collects "friends." He furthers this idea by going through the categories he keeps people in, categories probably familiar to many users of Facebook (although they probably haven't created actual lists). This was an interesting video, but it wasn't hugely entertaining. Nor was the idea revolutionary or providing a new perspective on the issue.
The New Yorker cover is a bit more tricky. While at first glance it might appear that the cover is making a mockery of (at the time) candidate Obama, and casting him as a terrorist, it is really making fun of those who believe this. It does it by extreme exaggeration of, well, everything. From the burning flag to the gun to the grins slapped across the faces of the Obamas, there is nothing reasonable about this picture. Just as the creator believes there is nothing reasonable about thinking Obama is a terrorist. I quite enjoyed this drawing and like it because it is done in a way that can leave people thinking it says the opposite of what it says. Although such confusion isn't always good for the creators, it provides much amusement.

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Jacob Desutter
1/7/2013 08:06:16 pm

I also felt the facebook was a bit boring, as the amount that argument has been by stand up comedians and every critic of the site. While it wasn't funny, it at least got its point across well, like the New Yorker cover-- althouth the New Yorkers was far more amusing.

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Jerred Zielke
1/7/2013 07:49:52 pm

The first selection, from the Onion, satirizes how obsessed people are with having to have the newest things and will do anything to be first. Obviously no one is going to sleep outside a coffee shop, but it is humorous to think people actually do this for new products. The second selection, the Youtube video, satirizes Facebook and how many people don't actually know a lot of their friends on the site. The animated person in the video thinks of the website as more of a game instead of a way to socialize. The third selection, the magazine cover, satirizes how some people thought that Obama is a terrorist and how crazy those people are. Obviously, Obama isn't a terrorist, but I can see how this picture was controversial. Not everyone would see the satire in the picture and think the artist was serious about the picture.

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Jacob DeSutter
1/7/2013 08:01:00 pm

In the first article by 'The Onion", the primary target of it i the area residents who line up around the block to get news, even when it costs more time to know about events than you would actually spend doing them, as one person mentions "“I had to camp on the sidewalk all night in a sleeping bag, but look!”" to get only a measly piece of information. This ever going drive is portrayed completely seriously in the Onion, and the writer even brings up past weeks or years where the bulletin board was "put up" and incidents where a mother was hospitalized because she was trampled by people attempting to get to the board. It is also funny how there is only a single sheet of paper, rather than making copies for people who care everyone is forced onto the same crowd.

The youtube video takes a stab at the 3000 long facebook friendlist and the way it nearly seems to be a game (the gray bloke mentions it as a mmo just like world of warcraft). He goes on to make separate categories of his friends to keep track of them, with having the largest one being 'People I will never actually meet' and highlights facebook as the sort of meaningless social counter that often come with it. He even adds the "friends" quote, showing that he doesn't really have true meaning of the world.

The New Yorker cover takes every negative sterotype about Obama and slaps it on him. Obama in this cover is a militant Muslim intent on destroying America and letting the terrorist win (the burning American flag in the fire place, along with the portrait of Bin Laden lend themselves here.) His wife is shown with an AK-47 and in a militant dress code that makes it look as if she took the White House by storm, and is doing the traditional fist-pump that the couple does. This is used to show the craziness of that potrayl of Obama is. The entire cover is taking a jab at scare tactics that plagued Obama in 2008, and again in 2012 (less Muslim, and a modern would need a hammer and sickle somewhere but still). it shows the desperation of such tactics and how silly they look to someone on the outside looking in. The New Yorker got some big flak from running this.

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Justin Marutz
1/7/2013 08:19:41 pm

I have to say I agree with everything Taco has said except for maybe the last point, ,more or less about calling Obama a terrorist in my opinion.

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Justin Marutz
1/7/2013 08:18:26 pm

In The Onion's article, the author uses satire of American ideals. Always wanting to know everything, not even letting others get in the way, trampling a mother, just to see or get something. People waiting hours or even days for just some measly piece of paper. It is funny though because some people do, though not for a coffee shop. The FaceBook one pokes the joke that facebook is a game and adds people he doesn't even know. Dividing them in to sub categories like attractive women, people he know, people he doesn't know etc. Showing how ridiculous having 3000 friends on Facebook is. On the cover of the New Yorker, at this point Obama is fairly new in his presidency dressing him and his wife in terrorist attire. Which is poking at how people think Obama is a terrorist which and just points out how stupid that argument is. Including a burning flag and a few automatic weapons, when in actually they have two daughters and a dog.

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Marcus Shannon
1/7/2013 08:35:33 pm

The Onion’s seem to satirize events that are usually found when a new product is released and is completely pointless to get excited over. The clamoring of the crowd and its comments on what new thing is being posted is the exact same mentality of that of crowds waiting for the next new best thing, but then is replaced the following year with the same product that garners even more crowds before release. The author was able to take something insignificant, like a news board, and relates it to society’s need for the next best thing. I found this funny in nature because I was able to understand from the start what was being made fun of, but I could see how someone might become confused.
The Facebook video hit it spot one with how it’s a site to “collect” friends that have rarely anything in common with one another. The way he described everything in his tone of voice made this video seem like a serious one when it was doing the opposite. He is able to criticize the points of Facebook without directly coming out and saying it. When all is said and done he even says at the end of the video to follow him on it. The first half of the video is the highlight when it comes to describing it, but I believe it becomes rather dull afterwards. He gets the point across but drags it out for more than it should be.
Finally the picture with the Obamas in the White House portrays them as terrorists with over emphasized features. The burning flag, Osama’s picture, the garb. Everything has a focus on what the artist was trying to do, and it seemed to get the job done. This was a little bit extreme and horrible on its one right with how it showed the Obama’s, but in the end it showed what the main focus of the magazine was about.

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Kylie Wermund
1/7/2013 08:55:09 pm

The article from The Onion satirized the American person's need for gossip and news before everyone else knows it. To get this point across, the article is written with a serious tone in the format of a news report. The author uses quotes to keep the tone consistent throughout the piece. This article is quite accurate. I think that people really do feel the need to keep up on the latest news and gossip whether it is important or not. The video is satirizing the idea of "friends" on Facebook. This is less serious than the article on The Onion. It is mocking those people that have an insane number of friends on Facebook that are "People I will never actually meet." It is more enjoyable and funny to see a cartoon guy talking on the screen rather than reading a news article. The cartoon picture of Obama is satirizing the image that some people have of President Obama and his wife. This is an extreme image with the burning of the American flag, Mrs. Obama holding a machine gun and the portrayal of Obama. I find this image kind of funny because it gives those people who feel this way about Obama an image to put with their ideas and the image is really extreme and it shows those people how extreme their thoughts are.

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Carley Grau
1/8/2013 08:22:11 pm

In the article The Onion, the fact that everyone is actually extremely obsessed with information is being satirized. While no one actually reads the board, everyone i constantly on the intertnet, finding out information. The writer uses a lot of exaggeration, explaining how they went different lengths to get their information and were excited about pointless things. I think this article is a good satire about the constant stream of information people love to have through facebook and other networking sites. The satire about facebook is pretty obvious that its about how facebook is a website where people do nothing other than collect fake friends. He puts air qoutes around the word friends to show he knows theyre not really his friends. Its true that a lot of people on facebook are just friends with hundreds of random strangers. The New Yorker is ironically showing all the bad things people may have heard about the Obamas, way exaggerating with his wife holding a gun and him looking like a terrorist. He is trying to help the country and this may be someones way of disagreeing with how hes doing it.

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