Hope you all enjoyed the snow day! Plan on having your timed write on Monday. 

For this post, address my go-to question: what struck you in these two chapters? Remember, you can mention things that surprised you, things you learned, things you're questioning, etc. Consider both chapters in your response. Please cite specific examples from the reading and give a rationale to your reaction. 

Please proofread before you post and comment on at least one other post. 

Responses should be indicative of a close reading of the text. Can't wait to read your posts!
Maddie Williams
2/1/2013 09:27:07 pm

Hello everyone! I enjoyed these two chapters much more than the first one. They began to dig deeper into not only what spin is, but how to recognize it. I really learned a lot from the second chapter, as it went through all of the warning signs that hint to a spin. For example, when discussing the waning sign of The Dangling Comparative, the book states "Larger, better, faster, better-tasting. Advertisers frequently employ such terms in an effort to make their product stand out from the crowd....New Ban Intensly Fresh Formula deodorant claimed it "keeps you fresher longer"...they meant fresher than Ban's old formulation" (Jackson and Jamieson, 31). Example like this of each of the warning signs really struck me because they helped me understand the signs and put them into context. Similarly,chapter 3 went over the deception tricks, or different kinds of spins, that are most often used. The most valuable part of this chapter is the questions that are stated at the end of each example of a Spin Trick. They are questions the authors offer up, ones that we should ask ourselves in order to determine if we are being spun. The books suggests that to avoid the trick of Misnomers, we need to ask ourselves questions such as "What's behind that name? Does it really describe the thing they are trying to sell me? What would be a more accurate name for it?" (Jackson and Jamieson 46). I found these questions very helpful and beneficial to understand the chapters. All in all, this section of the book had a lot of information packed into it, but it was worthwhile because of all it taught me.

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Alex Forsythe
2/2/2013 02:53:24 am

I agree with the comments at the end of each section. It helps you to understand what we just read. I also thought that these chapters went into detail on not only what spin is, but how to recognize it.

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2/3/2013 07:37:05 pm

I was also struck by the dangling comparative. That method in particular seems easy to be fooled by. Nothing is compared with the claim- a complete set-up/trick!

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Kelsey Berndt
2/3/2013 08:46:41 pm

I agree that the questions on the end were very beneficial in solidifying what we learned in that section.

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Alex Forsythe
2/2/2013 02:50:42 am

Yooooooooo.
I thought chapters two and three to be much more enjoyable. I really liked how at the end of each chapter it kind of gave a summary of what each section was about. It helped me to understand it a little bit better. I also liked how these chapters went into topics other than politics, and of the politics that it talked about, I thought it was rather interesting. I really like how Jackson and Jamieson referred back to old presidents when talking about George W. Bush's term as president. They state, "Was Bush 'dealt a tougher hand' than Abraham Lincoln, whose election prompted the breakup of the Union and who took office just six weeks before the Confederates fired on Fort Sumter and began the Civil War? Tougher than Franklin Roosevelt, who took office during the Great Depression and later contended with Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941?" (Jackson and Jamieson, 33-34) This statement can be compared to a lot of different situations. Most infomercials try to compare two different things, saying one thing is harder than the other, tougher than the other, but really, they're the same or nowhere near as difficult. I was also surprised to know how much spin is put into politics. Some politicains will straight up lie to promote something. I really liked the coffee reference in chapter 3. I too think it's ridiculous to call a small coffee a "tall." A line I thought was amusing was, "'Listen, people: You should never, ever have to utter the words 'Grande Supremo' unless you are addressing a tribal warlord whowho is holding you captive and threatening to burn you at stake" (Dave Barry as quoted in Jackson and Jamieson 45). Again, I thought it was great how they had the questions at the end of each section to summarize what it was about. I thought that these two chapters really defined how to recognize spin in our society. From what I read of these chapters, I'm interested in seeing what the rest of the reading has in store for us.

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Emma Chester
2/2/2013 03:14:36 am

I agree with you about the lying in politics. I was surprised to learn just how much the truth can be twisted to deceive voters. Although it's actually quite clever, I still think that it is wrong and should somehow be regulated. I laughed at the part about the Grande Supremo because I thought it was funny too. It really is ridiculous that most people don't even question these things.

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Maddie Williams
2/2/2013 05:06:56 am

I agree Alex, I learn better reading the examples about non-politics! The politic ones get kind of old.

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Kaytlynn Toering
2/3/2013 11:21:40 am

Maddie...I agree with you about the politic examples. They did get old and a bit redundant. Yet I did have a hard times trying to understand some of the points that these examples were trying to make. I enjoyed the advertisement examples the best for actual products. The summaries at the end were really helpful to putting the whole story together and it helped relate to other parts of the book as well.

Carley Grau
2/3/2013 08:35:29 pm

I agree, the examples on politics tend to bore me!

2/3/2013 12:54:13 am

Hi Alex! I agree about the politicians. It's so sad that they have to lie about everything just to get votes! What happened to morals and the truth? Not only that, but it's so sad that all of the voters are deceived by their lies and if everyone were able to pick up and see through these spins, who knows where America would be today, president wise.

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Emma Chester
2/2/2013 03:11:04 am

I found these two chapters very interesting as well as informative. It is still really striking me that we encounter so much spin everyday. The claims that some of the advertisements or politicians made were really just outrageous, and the statistics that told how many people believed them shocked me, too. I liked the part about the "dangling comparison" because I have often thought of this myself: better, larger, faster than what? The book does a good job pointing out that vagueness is definitely something to look for when identifying spin. I also liked the part about the Starbucks coffee sizes because that never made sense to me. The only size that actually means what it is called is "venti," and the names can be misleading. The part about the visuals stood out to me too, but it's because I never really thought of it that way. The point about the pleasant settings for commercials while listing side-affects is both genius and cunning. I think the book made it clear that we need to listen to the words and not get absorbed with the pictures, so that was good advice. Overall, I am really enjoying UnSpun.

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2/2/2013 11:22:57 pm

Emma, I totally agree with you. I never realized how much spin is actually out in there and how much we fall for it. I always thought it should be common sense not to fall for stuff like that but this book it showing me how easily tricked we can become.

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Zoey Holmstrom
2/3/2013 10:36:09 am

I definitely agree with you. I always thought that only people with little common sense bought into spin, but really everyone falls for spin. There are so many different ways that this book points out that I wouldn't have known was spin unless I read it.

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2/2/2013 11:19:33 pm

I did not find these next to chapters of Unspun to be enjoyable but I did learn a lot from them. I liked the topic of chapter 2, the idea that “fear and insecurity can still cloud our judgment” (Jackson and Jamieson 26). This book shows great examples of what products use spin and then what ways we can detect it to become unspun. The section that I found most striking in this chapter was the one about A Story That’s “Too Good” (Jackson and Jamieson 26). I think I found this section the most interesting because I saw myself falling for this type of spin, I would fall for a product that looked “too good” before I truly checked out all the details. In chapter 3 again was able to strongly show with examples of how to become upsun by easily fallen for “Tricks of Deception” (Jackson and Jamieson 43). The eye candy trick, number 4, was the one I feel like I notice the most; I see many commercials everyday pulling off this type of deception (Jackson and Jamieson 51). But all of the tricks continued to teach me in some way how to stay away from becoming spun. I love all the examples the book provides but as we continue I hope to find that there are more examples then political ones because I am getting bored with them, but if not that’s okay because I am still very much enjoying this book.

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Leland Dunwoodie
2/3/2013 12:55:21 am

I agree with your opinion of the "fear and insecurity" section. I, too, found it enlightening. I think that it is interesting to find out how the human brain naturally responds to all the different types of propoganda thrown its way.

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Alex Miller
2/3/2013 10:02:06 am

I agree with Margaret when she mentions the eye candy section. I too notice it in a lot of commercials. Such as makeup commercials and shampoo commercials.

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Kylie Wermund
2/3/2013 11:22:40 am

I also found Eye Candy to be the most attention grabbing section. It was really relatable for me. Bells were ringing in my head as I was reading and recognizing that what Jackson and Jamieson are saying really is true. It's becoming easier to enjoy the book as I find myself relating to what they are saying.

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Kasey
2/3/2013 11:34:44 am

I also liked the idea that “fear and insecurity can still cloud our judgment”. Because it’s so true. If we are scared or feeling sorry for our self’s we are more likely to listen to someone who is telling us that buying something will make us feel better.

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Leland Dunwoodie
2/3/2013 12:51:25 am

Both of these chapters forwarded notions that I had not previously considered and found interesting. One point that struck me is the point that says "a raw appeal to fear is often used to cover a lack of evidence that a real threat exists" (Jackson and Jamieson 28) because I don't usually think of fear as a cover-up for a lack of facts. I also found the notion that visual images have more impact than spoken words to be enlightening. Jackson and Jamieson quote Richard Darwin, a Reagan aide, saying "'pictures tend to overpower spoken words'" (28) to prove their point. I always try to listen for warnings that dispel a product's benefits, but I never realized that the human brain is actually more influenced by visual images. Another thing that struck me was the different ways that the authors tried to prove their points; they use eight "tricks" in chapter three and six "warning signs" in chapter two. While I find the authors' many examples to be tedious, their main point, to be wary of false ads, is effective. I am already more wary of the sales pitches I see in commercials. It will be interesting to see examples of the falsities listed by Jackson and Jamieson in action during the Super Bowl commercials tonight. I am looking forward to reading less about politics as the book goes on. I am interested in current political issues, but not in how society viewed political propoganda during past administrations.

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Jeff Lueders
2/3/2013 02:35:30 am

I have also become more aware of ads since we started reading this book. Before, I've always noticed some weaknesses in their pitches, but now there are other things I'm noticing too and more things are starting to support my disbelief of advertisements. I also agree with your opinion on the political focus the book has. It is annoying that it keeps reciting things from the past and I wish it would focus else where.

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2/3/2013 04:08:44 am

Has any one ever listened to the warnings on anti-depressants or drugs that help you quit smoking? The warnings are ridiculous! Liver failure mood swings thoughts of suicide/ depression, change in weight swelling of the tongue or throat and dizziness all while the actor is walking around happily in the add... seriously? Pictures definitely out power words.

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Evan Pille
2/3/2013 05:09:46 am

Something I haven't seen the book comment on yet is commercials tendency to use humor to sell products without actually talking about the product. I'm sure we'll see a lot of that in the Super Bowl.

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Owen Carow
2/3/2013 12:32:01 pm

I was also surprised that the mind was tricked by the conflicting visuals and narration in the report. I wonder if that says more about psychology or culture. Do people just hear what they want to hear and make their surroundings conform?

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Jeff Lueders
2/3/2013 02:27:00 am

These two chapters were lack luster for me to read. I was expecting a whole new way of thinking and for something to blow my mind, but it all seemed common sense. The chapters also seemed repetitive in their ways of finding "spin." Both tell us to ask the question "Compared to what?" when stuck with a statement using bigger, faster, stronger, or biggest, fastest, strongest (all they did was change the endings) (33,58). All it told us to be wary of what is thrown at us, which they shouldn't have to say; society should be intelligible enough to know when they're being fed a lie. One thing I did like about the book were the examples it gave though. I liked how they gave real lies that have been used and showed them to us, and analyzed why people might fall for them. They especially had a lot of political examples which were intriguing, though what else can you expect from politics? In general, the reading wasn't bad, but I would enjoy it more if they pointed out things that I'm not already doing.

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Evan Scieszka
2/3/2013 04:04:40 am

I agree to some extent with what you are saying in that a lot of the things they pointed out with politics especially were things that I already noticed before reading this book. Also the part about medical commercials showing happy people while reading awful side affects was obvious to me as well.

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Evan Scieszka
2/3/2013 04:00:31 am

I personally felt that these two chapters really got into the many common tactics used by advertisers or politicians to make a point so that the reader can spot them when they are being implemented. What I really found interesting in chapter 2 was the part about how people use fear to get consumers to do something. The authors made a great point when they said, “With memories of September 11, 2001, still fresh, those appeals to fear helped generate overwhelming public support for the war” (Jackson and Jamieson 27). This was of course referring to Bush’s use of 9/11 to spark support for the war in Iraq. I found it interesting because whenever people die or a tragedy occurred, I never really thought much about facts, instead I just believed that whatever the government was doing was the right course of action. Chapter 3 was much of the same, but went into more advertising schemes that we see so much on TV and in stores. I really enjoyed the part about literally true falsehoods because it talks about people who say things that are technically true, but mean nothing when properly understood. It was very interesting when the authors said that “Reduced Fat” often implies low fat and that companies will use comparisons to make their product seem so much better. They will also use some statistical tricks to persuade audiences into thinking that something may be low on salt or fat when it actually has a lot (Jackson and Jamieson 59). Additionally the questions given at the end of segments throughout the chapters were really helpful to me in identifying spin more effectively. Overall this chapter certainly got into more detail into finding spin and was certainly more helpful.

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Kathleen Janeschek
2/3/2013 12:04:17 pm

I agree about how people using fear to manipulate others was interesting. While it seems like something that should be considered off limits, all too often do we see this occurring in our world. One only has to look at the recent Sandy Hook tragedy and the talking points that arose in response to see an example of it.

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Jared Wendland
2/3/2013 04:02:15 am

In chapters two and three the book begins to pick up. What the authors do is begin addressing more of the different types of spin and how to see it. I particularly like how they divide their points up in to “warning sign” sections giving the reader a heads up then jump into it. One section that was interesting was the section from chapter two about the FUD factor. It was interesting in that it addressed the utilizing of fear to achieve a goal. The examples they used were especially effective in presenting this idea of scare tactics. When they talk about the pop ups that would read “warning possible spyware detected” it wasn't really anything new for me. (26) What was striking though was when they were estimating how many probably fell for a simple play on fear. Another section that was interesting was the one about weasel words. I found this interesting in that people see this a lot in stores but the book ended up connecting this tactic to Hawaiian Punch. The company describes there drink as “fruit juicy red” which leads the consumer to think it is hundred percent real juice. (50) The fact is that it doesn't and weasel words a tricky technicality to be aware of.

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Ravi Shah
2/3/2013 09:33:57 am

The points that you make are very good, and I thought the same thing about the spyware ad. The examples that were used seem to be designed to show readers how common these things can be, and show how often people are tricked by the simplest word play into doing something incredibly stupid. I was also surprised by how much money people can make off of these simple tricks, and how soft the penalties are for those people. The technicalities and word tricks are surprisingly effective in convincing people. Personally, I, like Jerred, think that this is an interesting and useful book.

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2/3/2013 04:03:33 am

After reading one and two I feel much more unspun already. Knowing that advertisements use the Bigger Faster method to spin us to buy their product. Reading these chapters though does make me wonder just what in our world isnt spun. Politics are now mostly spinning and it is leaving me asking the question what in our world is true.... So I guess the book is doing its job. The second chapter is much better than the first I feel because it dives into the spinning vs. the idea of being spun. The dangling comparative is in my opinion the worst kind of spinning that deceives many people into thinking about people and their political ideas (32). I do wish that there were other examples than politics of the election though. Maybe a varied group of examples from elections past might be a good example as well. All in all though I feel less spun so congrats to the book for that.

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Samir Shah
2/3/2013 06:40:43 am

I completely agree with Will. I especially like how you talked about the political spin that is constantly referenced. I’m also beginning to think that we could start to spin Fast and Nasty shirts. Perhaps: if you wear this shirt, you will fly. I also agree with the dangling comparative, because I too think that that is the worst type of spin. Nice job bro!

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Evan Pille
2/3/2013 05:03:54 am

What struck me the most about this reading was the story of George Lakoff, a professor who had also talked about "framing" the debate (something he had in fact done in his books). What struck me was how you can have even respected people deceiving you with these tricks. It makes me more then anything wonder if there is any way to actually find good information, not just see when it's bad.

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Samir Shah
2/3/2013 06:35:07 am

The second and third chapters were a lot more informational from the first. I learned so much more about being spun and how to avoid it, also that many people use spinning to make things seem more appealing. One of the examples that stood out to me was when they talked about spyware, and it said, “WARNING: POSSIBLE SPYWARE DETECTED… spyware can steal information from your computer, SPAM your e-mail account, or even CRACH YOUR COMPUTER (pg. 27).” It went on to say that recipients who clicked the link would have pay $34.99 to have a scan of their computer. In reality this is a lie, after people paid the money, there was no scan, no messages, and no spyware. I was shocked that a company could easily convince people to just throw away $35 to someone whom they didn’t even know. The chapter showed how to detect and stay away from these companies, and that would save people a lot of money. One thing that I am surprised about is how many political references they have in this book. It’s strange to think that politics trick and manipulate the American people to follow them. Also, all of the references the have in the book are from recent elections, the oldest dating back to Clinton in 1999, so this means that presidents have been doing this for decades. Imagine all of the lies that the leaders of our country have told the people just to vote for them. One thing that I really like was in chapter three, when the author talks about inappropriate names for products and he gives the explanation that says, “ What’s behind the name? Does it really describe the thing they are trying to sell me? What would be a ore accurate name (pg. 46)?” I really like this because I noticed that I see a lot of products on shelves that look like they mean something but really mean another. Overall I really enjoy this book, although I think the authors should move away from talking about mostly political spin and more market spin. I’m looking forward to the next chapters!

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Sara Buckle
2/3/2013 11:32:14 am

I didn't really think about it until reading your comment, but it really does make you think about what lies you have heard and believed from the most recent election. It's unsettling to know that the candidate that you entrusted your vote to was manipulating you.

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Rachel Tuller
2/3/2013 07:15:04 am

I suppose what really struck me in these two chapters were the way they deceive you with words. How a 'tall' is really a 'small' and how 'large' is really the seventh biggest. I thought that the way people use words like that in our world is really bit excessive at times. It sometimes seems like people go out of their way to find words to use that make things sound better than what they really are. Also in these two chapters, I got to thinking about how commercials really do never show you the side effects of a medication like the book says on page 51. They just show you someone being happy with their life. Now, usually when I watch TV, I also have a book open in my lap so I hear the commercials more than I see them. However, this book is making me go back and think about what a difference it makes when you're just watching or just listening to commercials. I found that kind of interesting.

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Danielle Curley
2/3/2013 08:28:38 am

I agree that the words they come up with to describe sizes is a little ridiculous, whats wrong with small, large and medium? Also the book was spot on about medication commercials showing happy people while describing side effects. They try to distract you from them.

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Katelyn Tillstrom
2/3/2013 10:41:07 am

The "side effects" part was one of the most interesting things to me as well. I never thought about how the picture is more "eye candy" than anything else; it distracts us from what really could go wrong!

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Danielle Curley
2/3/2013 08:24:31 am

What struck me in chapters two and three is the many different ways to spin and the most common way is The FUD Factor, which means fear, uncertainty, and doubt( pg 26). Fear is used in advertisements to sell products and in government. There are so many other ways to spin like making something sound too good to be true, comparing something and not saying to what, and glittering generalities. Another thing that struck me was when they talked about the assault weapons ban in 1994 and how it didn't ban what the name suggest. I was shocked to find how much spin there is around us and how we don't really think about it. I also found it interesting that a lot of ads are targeted to ones insecurities to sell products.

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Richard Harris
2/3/2013 09:19:50 am

First of all, thank you for mentioning the Assault Weapons Ban. I thought I'd be the only person to bring that up. Besides that,it's a little ridiculous how many styles of spin there are. A politician or any other company will go through all of the effort to use spin as an advertising scheme but it's too much to be honest. Sometimes, I don't think that makes any sense.

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ColliHala
2/3/2013 10:51:36 am

I concur with Richard, especially since in my class we spent about half an hour talking about the new gun control bill and how it doesn't do what you'd think. Anyway, you and I were on the same page. We both were surprised at how much spin there was around us without even thinking about it. The sheet volume and methods and instances of spin is stunning.

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Richard Harris
2/3/2013 09:03:35 am

I'm shocked in general by how much spin really occurs in this world. It's one reason I don't like politicians as much because I never know what they say will be true. On thing that blows my mind is how people will go ahead and throw 35 bucks away to remove all of the spam on their computer(pg 27). I can relate to this because of a virus my computer caught while looking up information on a wiki for a video game. One of the few things I could do was pay to buy a fake antivirus software that would remove it. I was smart enough to not give away credit card numbers and download software that did remove it. To sum that up, I'm shocked how adults fall for that anti-spam BS while a teenager like myself does a quick search to find a program that works.

What makes me facepalm more than anything else is the segment about the Assault Weapon Ban (pg 44). It makes me believe some politicians are retarded in addition to being dishonest. Just like now, politicians have no clue what they are banning; they just want to because it looks like something the military uses (and they're denying our 2nd Amendment right, too).

After reading these two chapters, I feel like I should be more wary about advertisements I see. It reinforces that someone should know about the facts of a product before falling victim to spin/deception.

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Michael Gorton
2/3/2013 10:41:59 am

As soon as I saw "Weapon Ban", I just wanted to chuck the book at a wall! I completely agree with your view of specific politicians not knowing anything about the actually percentage of licensed guns that are used for criminal activity(which is close to 0% btw). Trying to use an example as the shooting in Connecticut to ban something they themselves know nothing about is pathetic. Just a thought, but maybe calling the ATF BEFORE getting up on a stage to make a fool out of themselves might be a good idea.

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Lauren Clem
2/3/2013 08:54:13 pm

I, too, am amazed at how many things go on without notice. There are so many things that happen that are overlooked that really are important in one way or another. The fact of "spinning" occurs everyday, something I never took the time to even notice before.

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Ravi Shah
2/3/2013 09:28:27 am

These chapters were very interesting and informative one ways that many producers and politicians use spin to convince people of their opinions or ideas. The one that I think is seen the most is the "Weasel Words" (40), which I have seen a lot on commercials, advertisements, and even heard used by people in the school. Another thing that I see a lot is "a Story that's too good" (28). People tend to use exaggerations and false stories in their persuasions because there is little that can convince a person of something better than a story that is just too good. Many of the other things that I saw in the chapter I have seen in places in town or school or even on the highway billboards. This book seems to be useful in teaching about how to know what is true compared to what isn't and in discerning the lies and exaggerations that inevitably appear in every day life.

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Colby Clark
2/3/2013 08:44:56 pm

I like that all the examples are very common in everyday life. The book does a great job of picking relevant examples that any reader can recognize in their lives.

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Marcus Shannon
2/3/2013 09:40:12 am

What really impacted me was from third chapter, and how the fourth trick focused on imagery. When describing how medicine advertisement covers up side-effects by saying “one thing while showing the opposite” (Jackson and Jamieson 51). Usually when I see those types of commercials I focus on those because instantaneous death might detract from the nice background pictures. I see now that when people see images they make their own assumptions based on it than the actual words being said to them. The next trick also had me thinking about things from the past election. What is really the average when statistics just outright say them to be so? Every statistic has a background that shows if the information is really true, and now I’m more wary of what is the real indicator of a definite fact. I think by the end of this book I’ll become so paranoid of what’s being said to be true I’ll start denying everything.

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Alex Miller
2/3/2013 09:58:21 am

Uhhhh...ya, hi. These two chapters were more interesting than I thought they would be judging on the first chapter. The second chapter helped me recognize what exactly spin was used in and the tricks/wording that helped deceive people. Such as the Popeye example,"' I will gladly pay you Tuesday for a hamburger today'"(Jackson and Jamieson 36). This example shows the next generation is going to pay for it in politics and showed a tactic politics use but in a way that anyone can understand. In chapter three there are eight tricks they tell readers. One trick that I experience a lot of is," Trick #3: Weasel Words"(49). Examples of weasel words are," 'Up to' " (49) that are used during sales and clearance. I noticed logos are used frequently used throughout the book for the readers to understand the message the authors want to represent. In the two chapters there is so much information that it is overwhelming but there is a lot of information on spin that the next chapters should be very interesting.

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2/3/2013 12:59:53 pm

Hi Alex you're weird love Haley ❤

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Michael Gorton
2/3/2013 10:34:40 am

This book is really surprising me at how often I come across things with "spin" everyday! Chapter two was especially eye-opening. For instance, "the FUD factor" that was described I tend to see a lot when using the computer (26-27). There will randomly be a pop-up that blocks whatever I am trying to do, or my browser will freeze when an ad on a page opens. 'Tis very annoying. I also loved when the example of Wimpy from "Popeye" was used to describe the spin on politics (36). The sad thing is, the people today in Wimpy's position never actually follow through with what they say when our country needs them to. The last thing that particularly caught my attention was "The literally true falsehood", which made me realize how often people try to decieve others by interpreting a misleading statement differently (58-60). In the food industry, this happens more than some would care to admit. Take gum for example. When a label says "20% more flavor!", that 20% could be close to no change at all if the amount of flavor was small to begin with. Considering the amount of new concepts I have already learned, I am really looking foward to the next chapters!

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Kaity Wade
2/3/2013 10:48:21 am

I totally agree with you when you say that "people try to deceive others by interpreting a misleading statement differently." Doesn't chapter 3 do a great job in showing all of the different things with "spin" that we encounter all the time? I love how you used gum as an example. Those company's are pros at the "20% more flavor."

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Jeremy M. Barker, The
2/3/2013 12:47:23 pm

You're right, we do run into things like this everyday. I don't really find it surprising, but it indeed does make me think about it more as I read. I do like what you say about the "literally true falsehood" because that struck me the most. Misleading people by telling the truth is definitely used all the time since it's one way to not deceive without getting in trouble with the law.

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Katelyn Tillstrom
2/3/2013 10:38:17 am

It’s amazing how after reading any part of this book, how much more aware I am. Things I never really thought of before now make me think quite a bit. The second chapter seemed to be more focused on “reading between the lines.” The part that really stuck out in this part to me was the section about FUD, or “fear, uncertainty and doubt” (26). I never noticed this as a way to get people to buy things. I honestly thought that the product really prevented that fear or doubt. I guess it worked. However, that can also mean that the advertisers don’t have any evidence and rely only on our insecurities (28). That was very interesting. This chapter also taught me to compare. If something is “better,” “faster,” or “higher,” what is it “better” than (32)? Another interesting point in this chapter is the “Glittering Generalities.” Ask what they really mean by a certain phrase or word. Like the example they give: What was Kerry’s definition of the “middle class?” (39). In the third chapter, they talk about the tricks used, or “assault weapons.” The one that really jumped out to me was “eye candy.” My favorite line is “listen to the fine print” (55). We can hear what the announcer is saying, but we’re actually paying attention to what’s on the screen. The other trick that I found interesting was the “weasel words.” I actually know exactly how that goes, especially when they used the example: “Up to 50 percent off” (49). Advertisers aren’t lying, exactly. I really am learning and realizing a lot of things from this book. There are so many commercials that I look for all of these “tricks” in now, and they’re very helpful.

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Rachel
2/3/2013 11:15:34 am

The way the do talk about "fear, uncertainty, and doubt" is really interesting. It's goes to show that everything that in this world is really just playing on our emotions.

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Taylor Dale
2/3/2013 12:13:27 pm

Yeah, I liked how the authors explained how politicians and advertisers use our own emotions to decieve us. With all the possible ways they can decieve us that one is the most interesting. I never thought about it before, our human emotions let us fall prey to so many things. Now that I know what to look for I won't be fallen prey any more or at least try not to.

Kaity Wade
2/3/2013 10:38:57 am

These two chapters were not too exciting to me. They were very informative, and used tons of examples to further their argument, but all of their examples began to be overwhelming to me. Consequently, by the end of the chapter or section, I had to go back and re-read parts of it to figure out what it was about exactly. However, there were a couple parts that stuck out to me. First, when they addressed infomercials, and they said that if the images are striking no one cares what the person talking said (Jackson and Jamieson 52). As I read that, I thought about all of the memorable commercials I have seen, and that couldn't be more true. People can ignore all of the crazy side effects to advertised medicines if it looks like the people on the screen are happy. Company's sell products because of the images they portray. Going off of that, the second thing that struck me wasn't anything these authors said, it was my own interpretation of their spin methods. Reading these methods so far, I have seen all of them in one infomercial. Company's love to make their product look appealing, sound "too good to be true," and they don't actually give all of the facts on the commercial. Why would they? What struck me was the fact that in today's day and age, we need all of these methods and deception for products to sell, and it's been going on like that for decades. Even though these authors may not get my vote on entertainment, they get it from the way they take things that have gone on forever and wrap them up into one category:spin.

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Courtney Bennett
2/3/2013 01:10:53 pm

Despite being very enlightening, I also felt as if the chapters were a little boring. I zoned out a couple times and also had to re-read some sections. It's nice that there are examples to help us understand different kinds of "spin", but the excessive repetitive pattern of explanation and example did become a bit exhausting.

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CollinColliHalaHalamka
2/3/2013 10:48:23 am

The second and third chapters were rather eye opening. The thing that stuck me the most was the raw amount of 'spin' going on everything. One thing I really found interesting was the part about the pictures over spoken word. "Pictures tend to overpower spoken word" (Jackson and Jaimieson 52) is something extremely true, though I never noticed it until I read that. I see it all the time, from commercials, to sitting in class and being amazed at how much more interesting that spot on the wall in the classroom is than the teacher. It all happened without me even realizing that I wasn't even paying attention to the words being thrown at me. Just the sheer amount of spin going on, in commercials, politics, and even at Starbucks. Those little weasel words are everywhere, too. It's insane.

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Gunner Harrison
2/3/2013 11:15:25 am

The two chapters were much more entertaining to read than the first chapter. It was amazing to me how many different ways people can spin us. I thought the "average bear" technique was very impressive. It's amazing that a politician can state a real number that sounds so convincing, but actuallyeans something else. After reading the chapters it will be easier to identify spin, but I still believe people will not look into the numbers people spit at us.

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Kaytlynn Toering
2/3/2013 11:17:07 am

These two chapters were quite interesting. First off, I enjoyed them more because they are now developing more informative ideas and details that are beneficial for avoiding 'spin'. On the other hand, it did become a bit challenging to understand all of the political aspects and put all of the ideas together into one general statement relating to spin. I greatly enjoyed the two chapters because of the information. First, I thought it was beneficial to point out the different things that people use that could warn people about spin. For instance, I really enjoyed the Glittering Generalities section beginning on page 39. One specific example mentioned the specific word choice some companies use to get interest or to sell items (39). Another important warning to me was the Superlatives Swindle. This section talked about the importance of the superlative words that people look at (33). They look at these words and determine that just because a label says 'best', they have to get it, even if its not the best (33). It's basically a hoax and a way to get people to look at something or buy it. The next chapter gave basic rules and tips to stray away from spin that I found very interesting. My two favorites were Eye Candy and the Literally True Falsehood. In Eye Candy, I learned that the images portray a completely different message that the advertisement is trying to provoke. Telling people there are side effects but showing them happiness and good times? People will most likely tune words out and focus on pictures (51). In this way, it's telling the truth, but targeting an audience at a time when they are vulnerable to what they are listening to (53). In the Literally True Falsehood, advertisements tell a lie, but stretch it so much that it appears true and is almost true. For example, Lean Cuisine misguided followers to believe that it had less sodium than it did, yet had more sodium than any other dietary producer (59). This trick does not tell the complete truth and when people discover this, they feel like they've been lied to. Over all, these two sections appealed to me because they taught good skills for avoiding and discovering spin. It also opened my eyes to things I've never thought of before and as a result, I've changed my way of thinking on numerous things.

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Kasey Shoemaker
2/3/2013 11:17:08 am

These chapters, 2 and 3, were full of helpful hints on how to catch the art of “spin”. In chapter two, the warning sign that struck me the most was: If it’s scary, be wary (pg 26). Like the book says this is so simple yet, everyone still seems to fall prey to the simple tactic of fear. Chapter 3 teaches tricks of “spin”. Trick#3: Weasel Words (pg 49) is the trick that made me think the most. Stores put up signs that make it seem like you’re saving a lot of money when you are not saving as much as you believe. I also enjoyed each introduction to the chapter because they prepared you for what was ahead and made you start thinking about things.

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Sara Buckle
2/3/2013 11:27:40 am

I think that this book really picked up in the last couple of chapters. I think that we're all acutely aware of exaggerations and truth bending in politics and advertisements, but Chapters 2 and 3 really begin to explore unknown ground among these things. I really like how the second chapter is separated by "warning signs" and I found some of them very interesting, such as the section about dangling comparatives. I never really thought about what exactly is being compared when a claim is made for something "better" or "bigger". I'll forever find myself questioning those things when I hear them, looking for what exactly is being compared. Something that caught my attention in Chapter 3 was the section called "The Average Bear", I always look at an average as something typical, because that's what whoever is sending me the message wants me to believe. I never realized that this can be used to change my perspective on figures and statistics to see something as typical, when it's just outbalanced by outliers.

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Zoey Holmstrom
2/3/2013 11:29:57 am

I was very pleased to find these chapters even more interesting than the first one. I feel like with each chapter I read, I continue to gain even more knowledge on what spin really is. In chapter two, what stuck out to me the most in the reading was the section with the title of 'WARNING SIGN: The Dangling Comparative" above it. Here, the authors talk about how companies try to 'make their product stand out from the crowd'. They mentioned a deodorant brand that claimed to 'keep you fresher longer", but instead of being compared to other leading brands, it was simply compared to an earlier version of itself (31). This really made me think about products that use this type of rationale for advertising today. It made me curious to think about products that claim to be better than the rest, but really are just better than a previous version of themselves. This is another example of spin that people fall for every single day. This opened up my eyes to the fact that even people with a lot of common sense can give in so easily to spin.
In chapter three, the section under the heading "Trick #8: The Implied Falsehood" really struck me. The main idea of this section is about advertisers implying an idea that they can't directly say to consumers without getting into some sort of legal trouble (61). The authors go on to describe a product called 'Ab Force' which claimed to make a person lose inches off their waist from muscle twitches stimulated by the belt (61). From this idea they gained millions of dollars for an idea that really didn't even work. The producer had never even made a 'specific claim', but still managed to scam many Americans of their money (62). It's amazing that people are so apt to believing advertisements like this that if you just dig deep enough into the ads, they really make no sense at all. I liked that the authors give questions for consumers to ask like, "Why don't they just come out and say it?" (62). I will really consider questions like this the next time I see a suspicious ad and try and determine its legitimacy.

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Kylie Wermund
2/3/2013 11:34:09 am

First of all, I really liked how these two chapters were broken up into smaller sections. It made it very easy to follow as I read. Some of these sections I found interesting and quick to read because I wanted to know more about the examples they give. However, others were not so easy to read. Many examples include politics and while some of these examples were engaging, others were not. I enjoyed the examples about the advertisments more than political campaigns. With these two chapters, I began to believe what the authors were saying more and more. I think they are doing a great job of showing both sides of a story and keeping everything fair. For example, on page 32, Jackson and Jamieson write, "Just to be fair, we should note that the Democrats..." I thought this made the authors seem more reliable and makes me feel like they really are trying to tell me what I need to know no matter who it involves. I really enjoyed "Eye Candy" in the third chapter. It made me consider all of the advertisments for medicine on TV and how they all really do show happy people that show no symptoms. This section really made me think about how much I don't pay attention to and how badly I am being spun.

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Kathleen Janeschek
2/3/2013 11:53:49 am

I found these two chapters to be highly informative about the techniques used to deceive people. While most of the methods they described already seemed to be fairly obvious to me, it was nice to have a name and rationale for the techniques. Take "Trick #4: Eye Candy," like many people, I'd always found the juxtaposition of pleasing images and unpleasing words to be highly amusing, but until now, I had no idea about the whole "seeing over hearing" phenomena (Jackson and Jamieson 51). Had I been asked whether how we weight our senses, I would have had no idea until now. Another thing I liked about these chapters was how the authors broke them up into "WARNINGs" and "TRICKs." I find that this divvies up the book into easily digestible chunks and makes it easier to find explanations and examples for whatever kind of manipulation one is looking for. Something I got a chuckle out of was how, just pages after telling the readers to be wary of people using words like "most" or "many," the authors blatantly use it themselves: "Most of the gains were up top, and many if not most Americans lost ground" (Jackson and Jamieson 56). In fact, this seems to be quite common of them.

Personally, I am enjoying this book immensely. Propaganda is a fascinating subject that touches on many factors, such as human psychology, raw information, and manipulation. Reading this book almost makes me want to pursue a career in it. Perhaps I shall get a job at the Ministry of Truth.

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Colby Clark
2/3/2013 08:48:03 pm

Trick number four was very interesting. I had no idea that the images had such an effect on the audience to the point where they forget the actual words.

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Taylor Dale
2/3/2013 12:04:13 pm

Chapters two and three were much more enjoyable to read than chapter one. I like how each chapter was broke into sections for each trick or warning sign. The examples also helped me understand the ones that I did not quite understand. For example, the warning signs about paying later. It made sense but I was not sure how exactly it worked. So when the book uses the example about social security, get it now but the youth will have to pay for it later, it made total sense (36). It is also interesting how the authors use cartoons and common phrases from childhood experiences, such as, the Popeye cartoon (35)and the “Average Bear” (55) It made the reading fun and easier to relate to and easier to understand. The authors gave tools that make it easy to find. Such as the warning signs “The Dangling Comparative” and “The Superlatives Swindle,” they give words or phrases that that make it easy to pick out the deceptions. The warning signs, to me, were much easier to understand than the tricks. Although “Weasel Words” and “Eye Candy” were fun and easy to get. I never thought about the picture covering up the words the way they do (51).Overall I learned so much just within these three chapters, hopefully I can carry it over into real life.

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Owen Carow
2/3/2013 12:27:59 pm

The book seems to be getting a bit formulaic with these two chapters, alternating between "trick" and explanation. It's difficult to tell what the difference is between the two, other than the fact that the "tricks" described in chapter three are more specific and situational. I wouldn't say that's a bad thing. In fact, I am still interested in the way voices we listen to everyday can be lying so blatantly. It seems like most of these methods depend on the audience failing to ask questions like "What do you mean by that, exactly?" (40). Several of the examples given were very surprising and somewhat disturbing to me. The first was the political report whose commentary was completely negated by the background footage (52). Another particularly disconcerting lie was the attempt to market KFC as health food (59). That example literally made me feel ill. It's bizarre to me that so many people count on the apathy and trust of the population to peddle their half-assembled statements. I suppose what I am wondering is how we can stop this kind of system, and I hope the book goes in that direction.

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Jeremy M. Barker (Stylishly Handsome)
2/3/2013 12:40:05 pm

At this point I've realized that the majority of things in this book are things about advertisements that I already know, but never cared to think about because it's unnecessary. Things like "A Story That's 'Too Good'" on page 28 (Chapter 2), or Weasel Words" on page 49 (Chapter 3) are facts I already knew, and didn't need an explanation for because they're simple. Unless you're.completely naive about advertising, explanations don't do much. On the positive side, I'm enjoying some of the examples given about deceptive advertisements and the how companies smart enough to use them get sued. Of course, not all get sued because not all advertisements are complete lies, just misleading. I like the "Dangling Comparative" in Chapter 2 (page 31) because it made me think of all the products I see that have advertisements that leave out what they've improved from, especially, since I work at a supermarket. For Chapter 3, "The Literally True Falsehood" on page 58 struck me the must because this seems like something I would try. Simply taking a separate meaning on something, the most literal meaning, is a sneaky thing to do. However, I usually take everything literally the first time I hear it, naturally, so a tactic like this seems like it'd be easy for me to use. Saying "reduced fat" even though it's not "low fat" is still true, yet misleading, and I personally find fooling people like that amusing.

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Dylan Gustafson
2/3/2013 01:25:26 pm

I like how we both talked about the same two topic headings. Anyways, I could not agree with you more. It seems that people should know about advertising more than they already do. Their common sense should kick in and say, "Hey, this is obviously not true, do not believe them." But, many people get sucked into the deceiving and fall for it.

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2/3/2013 12:57:55 pm

These two chapters were not very interesting in many areas, but I definitely learned something from it. I enjoyed the real life examples they gave and how they used statistics and evidence to build up their arguments against spins. I liked how in each chapter, after every trick they described and after they gave multiple examples, they ended with a small paragraph that helped summarize what they just said: "When you see or hear something being strongly implied but not states outright, ask yourself, "Why do they have to lay it between the lines like that? Why don't they just come out at say it?" Often there's a very good reason: what the speaker wants you to believe isn't true" (Jackson and Jamieson 62). It helped me regroup my thoughts and figure out what to take from that lesson and how to approach each spin on my own. I did not like how they ALWAYS used a political example. In my own humble and uninterested political opinion, I could not relate to it and it was painful to read: they take a whole section to discuss the different names each presidential candidate gave for taxes (Jackson and Jamieson 48). It just didn't intrigue me and I was bored. But when they gave real life examples, such as the commercials and how advertisers will have happy music and show happy people while have a narrator quickly read the horrid side effects (Jackson and Jamieson 51-55), I could understand it because I've seen it happen and often I realized I've been tricked by these spinners! All in all, I'm glad I'm reading this so that I can use my new found spin-detection knowledge to weed through false advertising.

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Courtney Bennett
2/3/2013 01:00:16 pm

I feel a lot more equipped to recognize “spin” after reading these chapters. I didn't realize just how much hidden deception exists in such commonplace areas in our society. I’m also surprised at how many believable strategies there are to twist the truth. I felt increasingly enlightened with each “Warning Sign” in chapter two: one that stuck with me was the “Glittering Generalities” section. I am becoming especially conscious of glittering generalities simply because so many advertisements are guilty of having them. A lot of commercials make brief statements that uplift their product with no evidence to back up their claims. The line “Learn to recognize glittering generalities, and you’ll notice them flying at you from every direction” (Jackson and Jamieson, 40) is certainly true.
Chapter three has turned me into a critic. I feel like I will forever be questioning the validity of every advertised or political claim. Actually, this book so far has convinced me that politics are super sketchy in general, because practically every tactic of “spin” described has a political example. I found “Trick #4: Eye Candy” striking because I thought it was interesting to learn how we are affected by what we see and how easily manipulated our brains are by visuals. I was intrigued by the discussion of the antidepressant commercial stating side affects while showing people smiling or smiling (Jackson and Jamieson, 51). I remember seeing similar adds on TV and finding the contrasting message and visuals odd, almost comical. Some guy would be talking about these terrible side effects and meanwhile this glowing butterfly would be gently floating in the sky or some girl would be smiling in her sleep. Anyway, I am pleased to learn the necessary tools to detect “spin” in our world and hope that it will have an effect on my ability to detect deception or at least make me a little more careful. (:

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Evan Kiel
2/3/2013 07:09:39 pm

I actually enjoy watching some of the eye candy commercials because they are so comical you may die from organ failure but I'm going to show a picture of someone playing with a puppy. The list of side effects are normally just so long.

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Justin Marutz
2/3/2013 08:08:45 pm

Yeah like at this point you might as well just deal with what you got instead of risking all the side effects.

Dylan Gustafson
2/3/2013 01:20:57 pm

Although I have learned a lot in the past two chapters, I feel that the majority of the topics are those that I already know of. In other words, it seems like common sense to recognize these things. For example, the WARNING SIGN: "A Story That's "Too Good"," is a topic that should be common sense to people. If it fits perfectly, you should question it. Yes, I have done that a lot with stories like that. However, one part in chapter two that I liked was the "Glittering Generalities." This gave me a whole new insight on delicate, calming words, and how to question them.I liked how the authors used the term "middle class" as an example. This term could mean a variety of things. I learned that middle class to some politicians are those earning up to $200,000. I was surprised at that. In chapter 3, I like the topic of "Weasel Words." This went into a whole new ballpark. I never considered phrases such as "up to 50 percent off," and how that meant that sales could range from zero to half off, and the company would still be telling the truth. Also, I really did not understand the topic of "Frame It and Claim It." I guess it just confused me on what they meant by that phrase. The explanations made some sense, but the heading is just throwing me off.

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Evan Kiel
2/3/2013 07:05:21 pm

These two chapters address the different forms of spin that happen in society. It by itself is not extremely striking but the examples that you may have thought to be true were all of the things it said were not. This was interesting having just watched the super bowl and see all of the advertisement and also currently I have a Norton popup that says terminated in bright red letters, it changes every time. Because of this I found the parts about the fake spyware protection to be an important part to being unspun (p 27). I see all the time computers that have tons of viruses on them and it is a huge fear of people that they will get them but they don’t want to buy real antivirus software because it is expensive. Some of the politics part were also eye opening I knew a lot of what they said stretched the truth but I was really sure how they got away with it and what the actually changed. The example that I liked the most was the one with the number of times Kerry had voted for “higher taxes” but truly Bush had counted every time he chose not to cut taxes (p 32). These chapters expose the spin in our society by breaking it down into its different parts and showing what to look for.

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2/3/2013 07:34:34 pm

There were a lot of examples of surprising ads and claims, some made by politicians like Bush, which were unrealistic yet affective at convincing people. On page 28, the Listerine ads were brought up again and I found it ridiculous that the ad insulted people in a way. Regarding the spun fact that people lose opportunities in life as a result of bad breath instills fear in audiences, so they will buy Listerine. That is pretty low because obviously Listerine won't improve your chances of getting a job or getting married. Something else that surprised me was that the author on the book about gun control made up facts and was a history professor. This was on page 28 as well. What he claimed was so far-fetched (just by reading it I knew it was false) and he still won over academics and won an award for his book, though it was taken away later.
I was surprised by those instances and in addition I learned on page 32 what a dangling comparative is formally defined as. I knew what it was but I referred to "any term meant to compare two things(using words like higher or better) is left dangling without saying what is compared" as a lie or an exaggeration. I liked the quote "language does the thinking for us" on page 44-45, which addressed misnomers I agree. That was a strong example when the authors compared the death tax to the estate tax. I was shocked how people reacted better to the better sounding, seemingly less complex name for the same thing. On page 48, I never considered that terms Bush used to call proposals like "No Child Left Behind" was a method of making Republican Policies appeal better to swing voters. I thought they were mere titles. On page 53, in my opinion the eye candy technique drug companies use for ads that specifically use happy music and images to distract from side-effects is easy to detect, and is quite entertaining as well. Most people are hopefully aware that no miracle drugs make people that happy without scary side-effects. Come on, that is common sense. Lastly, I couldn't believe the marketer for Abforce belts tried to sneak by being charged with false advertisement when he said on page 62, "never made specific claims." That automatically means the product never worked and he admitted it. That is shady.

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Justin Marutz
2/3/2013 08:07:39 pm

While the first chapter focuses on spin in the art of deceiving its viewers, the second aims at trickery and the tactics played. How someone can sell a product that does nearly nothing of what it states on the box (p 4). The way the authors incorporate politics into their examples is clever and is well thought of. I understood for the most part all of chapter one, but what struck me was some of the ploys used. People getting conned out of tons of money by "wealthy Nigerians" (p35). They don't even know you how did they get your email and why do they want your money if they are rich? Just the way each candidate hits each others weaknesses and pulls out fake ass facts to cover his own sorry ass amidst the voting craze, though each come with their secrets. How things can be affected later, when most of the time people just think about the here and now. How scare tactics (p 26) can sell and that deception is highly profitable (p8). It really has begun to open my eyes against the crude, I couldn't already see.

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Carley Grau
2/3/2013 08:34:37 pm

What struck me most was chapter 3. I was surprised by the several different ways of spin I've never caugh before and how obvious they seem. One way that I did notice is weasel words, like when they put up to 50 percent off bit really nothing is that much of a discount (49). Also the lottery tickets, how they make you think you won before you've even played(50).

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Lauren Clem
2/3/2013 08:52:22 pm

Chapters two and three from Unspun were very similar to the introduction, but offered new information about politicians with new examples as well. In a way, the repetitive feel of example after example was not very intriguing and made it hard to stay with the book. "Weasel Words" (40) was a fun section because I could think of many day to day occurrences. Commercials were the first thing that came to mind and they are small, thirty second segments that people can regularly overlook as examples of “spinning”. "The Literally True Falsehood" (58) was a section that I could connect with personally. I wouldn’t say I’m gullible, but I do believe a lot of things that are said the first time around, assuming many things before I know the full story behind it. Saying one thing but meaning another thing is a sneaky way of manipulating a situation, but is something that is use, by default, a lot on day to day basis. This book has its ups and downs, but there really is a lot to take out of it if you find ways to connect with the information and learn from it.

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Colby Clark
2/3/2013 08:57:22 pm

I really enjoyed this section of reading. The organization of the warning signs and tips was really practical and the examples were understandable and relevant. One thing that struck me was the examples of supposed tax cuts and increases (32). It annoys me that politicians compare their tax policies to the proposed plans of their opponents rather than current tax rates. It is very misleading and I doubt most of the voters will every sort their distorted language out. The eye candy example (52) was also disconcerting. I really had no idea that images had such a numbing effect on the audience.

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Kelsey Berndt
2/3/2013 09:08:12 pm

I really liked chapter three. I thought it was very beneficial and I liked the way it was divided up into the different tricks decievers use. Something that I learned was the eye candy effect. I find it fascinating that the human brain will disregard negative comments if there are positive images (51). It surprised me that I recognized one of the tricks of deception, the weasel words. I realized what those were a long time ago due to my shopping addiction.

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David Tarnowski
2/3/2013 09:12:42 pm

I think that these two chapters were the best so far. They were both incredibly informative and offered interesting insights. I really liked the way each chapter was broken up by different things to look for. This makes it easy to reference. I like how the units were set up so that you are introduced to what the "spinning" technique is, then you are offered and example, and then the authors end each section with what YOU should look for in your life to stay aware. The examples that they offer are incredibly helpful to me. Sometimes when I read the explainations I got confused, but once I read the real world examples I was able to clearly understand the concept. I think that that's one of the things that I like the most about this book.

I think that my favorite chapter of the book is number 3. I found it the most informative and interesting to read. "Trick #4: Eye Candy" and "Trick #1: Misnomers" were my favorite parts of the chapter. "Trick #4: Eye Candy" was really interesting. I never really noticed that I did that, but when I think about it, I do remember images more than the actual message. I think that this is a really clever "spinning" technique. It's so indirect that it almost is imperceptible. The second part I liked was "Trick #1: Misnomers." I thought it was interesting when the authors used the examples of the the coffee and olives. I never really thought of it like that. I really like the quote that they included in the book from Dave Barry. "Listen, people: You shoud never, ever have to utter the words 'Grande Supremo' unless you are addressing a tribal warlord who is holding you captive and threatening to burn you at the stake. JUST SAY YOU WANT A LARGE COFFEE, PEOPLE" (45) This is really a funny statement that is also an eye opener. When put this way it makes a lot of things in todays society that we accept seem really silly.

I would like to add that because of this unit we're learning in APLAC my Super Bowl commercial watching experience was tainted because I found myself analyzing them instead of just enjoying them.

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